Research Team

General
Academic Advisors
Refugees and Humiliation Project (alphabetical)
Terrorism and Humiliation Project (alphabetical)

The research branch of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) aims at encouraging research related to dignity and humiliation. We wish to contribute to the capacity of people to build peaceful societies and be mindful of how humiliation may disrupt the social fabric, and how social cohesion may be sustained by preventing humiliation from occurring. You are invited to develop ideas and projects that aim at dignifying our world, and preventing and healing humiliation. We wish to harness and nurture everybody's expertise for our HumanDHS research activities, create cross-fertilization and synergy, and hope that our efforts will grow organically from our discussions and meetings!

LINDA M. HARTLING
Linda M. Hartling, Ph.D., is the HumanDHS Director, and also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, HumanDHS Global Core Team, HumanDHS Global Coordinating Team, and the HumanDHS Education Team. She is furthermore the Editor of the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (JHDHS).
Linda M. Hartling is the recipient of the Association for Creativity in Counseling Research Award (see the slides of her acceptance talk).
Linda is affiliated with the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) at the Stone Center, which is part of the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College in Massachusetts. Until 2008, she was its the Associate Director. Dr. Hartling is a member of the JBMTI theory-building group advancing the practice of the Relational-Cultural Theory, a model of psychological growth and development. She coordinates and contributes to training programs, publications, and special projects for the JBMTI. She holds a doctoral degree in clinical/community psychology and has published papers on resilience, substance abuse prevention, shame and humiliation, relational practice in the workplace, and Relational-Cultural Theory. Dr. Hartling was co-editor of The Complexity of Connection: Writings from the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute at the Stone Center (2004) and author of the Humiliation Inventory, a scale to assess the internal experience of derision and degradation. She is currently a member of an international team establishing the first Center for Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies. [read more]
 
MOIRA R. ROGERS
Moira R. Rogers, Ph.D., is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and part of the core HumanDHS Research Management Team.
Moira is Associate Professor of Spanish at Eastern Mennonite University and Intercultural Consultant for a variety of organizations in Germany, Spain, and the U.S. She has a Ph.D. in Science and Technology Studies from Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, an MA in Biblical Studies from the Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminaries, Elkhart, IN, and a Teaching Degree in Philosophy from the Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Born in Argentina, Professor Rogers grew up in a multicultural and multilingual home in Buenos Aires and brings her personal and professional experiences as well as her Anabaptist faith commitments to bear on her teaching and research work. As faculty, she teaches Spanish, intercultural communication, and courses on Migrations/ Inmigration that integrate Global, National, and local issues. Her doctoral research focused on the elitism and mechanisms of exclusion of academic cultures in early eighteenth-century Germany, published as Newtonianism for the Ladies and Other Uneducated Souls: The Popularization of Science in Leipzig (2003). More recently, she has done training at the Summer Institute for Intercultural Communication in Portland, Oregon. She received an international award for her study entitled "Internationales Baucamp: Bausteine für ein gelingendes Zusammenleben im 21. Jahrhundert" (2005).
Moira currently leads a program at the University of Cadiz, Spain, and works with its newly established "Instituto de Inmigración e Interculturalidad." Her current research project is entitled "Humiliation and Human Strength: Stories of African-Spanish Migrations," a study that tells a chapter of the story of mass migrations in the 21st century with a focus on the Spanish enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla in northern Morocco. Through this study she hopes to contribute to breaking the cycles of humiliation fueled by the displacement of many and to making our world a hospitable place for all people.
 
MAGGIE O'NEILL
Maggie O'Neill is also a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, the HumanDHs Global Core Team, the HumanDHS Education Team, and part of the core HumanDHS Research Management Team. Maggie is particularly an Academic Advisor to our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. She is furthermore a Member of the Academic Board of the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (JHDHS).
Maggie O'Neill is a Reader in Criminology in the School of Applied Social Sciences at Durham University, UK. Until 2009, she was based in Criminology and Social Policy at Loughborough University. Prior to this she worked for eleven years in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at Staffordshire University and before that was ten years in the Department of Sociology at Nottingham Trent University. She co-edited Sociology (with Tony Spybey): the journal of the British Sociological Association from 1999-2002; she is a member of various professional associations including the National Network of Sex Work Projects and the British Sociological Association and British Criminology Association. She acts as a research consultant on community cohesion issues and has had commissions from the Home Office, and regional Local Authorities. Maggie researches the issue of prostitution, women's experiences, routes in to prostitution, and communities affected (since 1990) and forced migration (since 1998).
An expert in participatory action research (working with people, groups, communities to create change) Maggie has a reputation for developing innovative culture work to imagine new ways of understanding and articulating the experiences of crime and victimization, that breach disciplinary boundaries and expand and enliven the methodological horizons of cultural criminology. Her theoretical concept of ethno-mimesis (the inter-connection of sensitive ethnographic work and visual re-presentations) is a methodological tool as well as a process for exploring lived experience, displacement, exile, belonging and humiliation.
Research funding has been received from the AHRB; Joseph Rowntree Foundation; Home Office; Leicester Local Authority and Local Education Authority, East Midland Arts, Nottingham Trent and Staffordshire Universities.
Please see Maggie's blog at Policy Press.
Books include:
Adorno, Culture and Feminism (Sage);
Prostitution and Feminism: Towards a Politics of Feeling (Polity);
Prostitution: A Reader (Ashgate) with Roger Matthews;
Gender and the Public Sector (Routledge) with Jim Barry and Mike Dent;
Sex Work Now (Willen) with Rosie Campbell.
See also:
Humiliation, Social Justice and Ethno-mimesis, note presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 15-16, 2005;
together with Ramaswami Harindranath, Theorising Narratives of Exile and Belonging: The Importance of Biography and Ethno-mimesis in “Understanding” Asylum, in Qualitative Sociology Review, II (1, April 2006), pp. 39-52.
Forced Migration, Humiliation and Human Dignity: Re-Imagining the Asylum-Migration Nexus through Participatory Action Research (PAR), abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 14-15, 2006.
Re-Imagining Diaspora through Ethno-Mimesis: Humiliation, Human Dignity and Belonging (2007). In: Reimagining Diasporas: Transnational Lives and the Media, edited by Olga Guedes-Bailey (Liverpool John-Moores University), Myria Georgiou (University of Leeds), and Ramaswami Harindranath (University of Melbourne). Published by Palgrave Publishers, UK.
Humiliation and Human Dignity: Conducting Participatory Action Research with Women Who Sell Sex (see www.safetysoapbox.co.uk), abstract presented at the 2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 13-14, 2007.

"Making Connections: Ethno-mimesis, Migration and Diaspora," in Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society, 14, 289-302, September 2009, doi:10.1057/pcs.2009.5.
 

duckworth
CHERYL DUCKWORTH
Cheryl Duckworth is a professor of Conflict Resolution at Nova Southeastern University. A peace-building program leader and conflict resolution policy analyst, she has served such organizations as the Institute for Multi-Track Diplomacy and the Center for International Education. She has lived in Zimbabwe and Paraguay, and published and presented globally on her two passions, peace education and peace economics, exploring ways to transform the economic, political, social and psychological root causes of war and violence. Her more recent publications include her book which explores the role of dignity in social movements, Land and Dignity in Paraguay, and an article on her implementation of critical peace education curriculum in a juvenile detention home.
Cheryl has trained hundreds of students, teachers and community leaders in peace education and conflict resolution both in the US and internationally. Currently she serves as the faculty advisor of NSU’s Peace Education Working Group and on the Advisory Board of the Hope Development Foundation, a women’s rights and peace building organization in Pakistan.
Cheryl has taught qualitative research methods, foundations of conflict resolution and peace education. She is active in the Alliance for International Education, the Comparative and International Education Society and the International Peace Research Association. She blogs at Teach for Peace.
 

lindemann
THOMAS LINDEMANN
Thomas Lindemann is Professor of Political Science at Artois University (CERAPS Lille 2) and is visiting professor at Paris I-Sorbonne and Sciences Po Paris. He has recently published Penser la guerre: L’apport constructiviste (l’Harmattan, 2008), La guerre (Armand Colin, Paris 2010), Causes of War: The Struggle of Recognition (ECPR Press, 2010) and The Struggle for Recognition in INternational Politics (with E. Ringmar, Paradigm Publisher, forthcoming 2011).
 



KENNETH PARSONS
Ken Parsons is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Chairperson of the Religious Studies & Philosophy department at Avila University in Kansas City, Missouri. In addition to teaching Ethics, Political Philosophy, Philosophy of Technology, and Philosophy of Religion as well as pursuing his research on structural violence, moral testimony, and theories of power, he is co-working on establishing a Center for Global Studies & Social Justice at Avila.
 


REINHARD WOLF
Reinhard Wolf is a professor of international relations at the Department of Political Science at Goethe University, Frankfurt/M.  His current research focuses on the relevance of respect and disrespect in international relations, notably on the expression of, sensitivity to and consequences of disrespect among states and nations.  He is especially interested in applying insights and findings from both philosophy and social psychology to theoretical and empirical studies in international relations.
Please see:
Respect and International Relations: State Motives, Social Mechanisms and Hypotheses
Paper presented at the 49th Annual Convention of the International Studies Association, San Francisco, March 26-29, 2008.
Respect and International Relations: State Motives, Social Mechanisms and Hypotheses, abstract presented at the 13th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies "World Peace through Humiliation-Free Global Human Interactions" in Honolulu, Hawaii, August 20 to 23, 2009.

 

Schirmer

WERNER SCHIRMER
Werner Schirmer, PhD, studied sociology, political science and psychology at the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich/Germany and earned his doctoral title in 2007. His thesis examined how threats and security problems are constructed by communication processes and how they function in social relations. At present, he is working in a research project on respect and disrespect in the relations between Swedish natives and immigrants/ethnic minorities, conducted at the Department of Sociology at Uppsala University/Sweden. The purpose of the project is twofold: 1) to understand the meaning of respect in ethnic relations and 2) to contribute to a sociological theory of respect in social interactions. One of Werner's current major research interests is to study interethnic encounters in which participants’ legitimate expectations are unintentionally violated and thereby understood as disrespectful behavior. Werner Schirmer has been and is still working as instructor and supervisor for undergraduate students in a variety of topics in Sociology at the Universities of Munich, Uppsala and Gävle/Sweden.
Please see here some of his publications:
• Co-authored with Wendelin Reich, and Linda Hamann (2009), The Folk Concept of Respect, Unpublished working paper, Department of Sociology, Uppsala University, Sweden: Paper presented at the 13th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies "World Peace through Humiliation-Free Global Human Interactions" in Honolulu, Hawaii, August 20 to 23, 2009.
•  Co-authored with Wendelin Reich (2009), A Theory of Respect, Unpublished working paper, Department of Sociology, Uppsala University, Sweden: Work in progress, a shortened version of this manuscript will be presented in the Theory Section at the The American Sociological Association conference in San Francisco in August 2009.

 
GRACE FEUERVERGER
Grace Feuerverger is also a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, and a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, and of the HumanDHS Education Team.
Grace is Professor in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning (CTL) at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. A child of Holocaust survivors, Professor Grace Feuerverger grew up in a multicultural and multilingual home in Montreal and brings her personal and professional experiences to bear on her teaching and research work. Grace was educated at a variety of institutions - McGill University, the Università per Stranieri in Perugia, Italy, the University of California at Berkeley, the University of Alberta, the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and the University of Toronto.
Grace Feuerverger’s research interests focus on theoretical and practical issues of cultural and linguistic diversity, ethnic identity maintenance, and minority language learning within multicultural educational contexts, as well as on conflict resolution and peacemaking in international settings. Her courses at OISE/University of Toronto and her research projects explore the personal and professional texts of those who live within and between various cultural worlds. She continues to direct a multicultural literacy project in various schools in Toronto where she has developed an in-service teacher's guide and video programs. Grace is also Principal Investigator of a large-scale SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada) research study, which focuses on the school experiences of immigrant and refugee students in Toronto and Montreal. She is also an invited member of the Canadian Commission for UNESCO.
Professor Feuerverger’s recent award-winning book Oasis of Dreams: Teaching and Learning Peace in a Jewish-Palestinian Village in Israel (New York/London: Routledge/Falmer, 2001) is based on a nine-year study that she carried out as researcher in this extraordinary cooperative village and it is about hope in the midst of deadly conflict. It is a reflexive ethnography focusing on the two bilingual, bicultural educational institutions in this place of peaceful coexistence - an elementary school where Jewish and Arab children study together, and the "School for Peace" which is a conflict resolution outreach program for Israeli and Palestinian adolescents and their teachers.
Please see furthermore:
•  The "School For Peace": A Conflict Resolution Program in a Jewish-Palestinian Village, paper presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 15-16, 2005.
•  Building Bridges to Peace and Social Justice: An Emancipatory Discourse in a Jewish-Palestinian Village in Israel, abstract presented at the Second International Conference on Multicultural Discourses, 13-15th April 2007, Institute of Discourse and Cultural Studies, & Department of Applied Psychology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, as part of the 9th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.
•  Teaching, Learning and Other Miracles (Rotterdam: SensePublishers) explores teaching and learning in schools as a sacred life journey, a quest toward liberation (see the flyer).
•  On the Child's Right to Identity, the Best Interests of the Child and Human Dignity, an Excerpt from Chapter Three of Teaching, Learning and Other Miracles (2007, Rotterdam: Sense), “What I learned from my first day of Kindergarten” presented at the 13th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies "World Peace through Humiliation-Free Global Human Interactions," in Honolulu, Hawaii, August 20 to 23, 2009.
• Teaching and Writing Vulnerably: An Auto-Ethnography about Schools as Places of Hope, presentation held at the 2009 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 10-11, 2009.
• Acts of “Great Generosity of Spirit”: The Classroom as a Pathway Toward Abundance and Dignity, abstract presented at the 2011 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 8-9, 2011.
•  Auto-Ethnographic Reflections on the Immigrant and Refugee Experience in an Inner-city High School in Toronto, abstract presented at the 2012 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 6-7, 2012.
 

shultziner
DORON SHULTZINER
Doron Shultziner is also a Member of the HumanDHS Education Team.
Doron Shultziner is a lecturer and researcher. He holds a B.A. and a M.A. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and a Ph.D. from the University of Oxford. After he completed his Ph.D., Doron taught at Emory University for two years before returning to Israel. Among his research interests is the topic of human dignity in law. He published several papers in this field. His paper with Itai Rabinovici proposes an approach to understanding this concept in relation to self-worth, through a comparative legal-psychological investigation into three legal systems (US, ECtHR, and Israel). His book Struggling for Recognition: The Psychological Impetus for Democratic Progress shows how, and in what psychological ways, the Montgomery Bus Boycott (of 1955) and the struggle against apartheid in Port Elizabeth (of 1976), were motivated by a desire for dignity.
Please see:
•  "Human Dignity, Self-Worth, and Humiliation: A Legal-Psychological Comparative Approach," in Psychology, Public Policy, and Law 18 (1) [forthcoming; available online], co-authored with Itai Rabinowitz, 2012.
•  Shultziner, Doron, and Guy Carmi. "Human Dignity in National Constitutions: Functions, Promises and Dangers,"in American Journal of Comparative Law 62 (2), pp. 461-90, doi: 10.5131/ajcl.2013.0003, 2014.
 
PATRICIA RODRIGUEZ MOSQUERA
Patricia Rodriguez Mosquera is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and she is part of the core HumanDHS Research Management Team.
Patricia is currently Assistant Professor at the School of Social Sciences and Law, Brunel University, UK. Patricia studied psychology at the Autónoma University of Madrid (Spain) and the University of Amsterdam (UvA, The Netherlands). She obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Amsterdam in 1999. Her Ph.D. involved a series of cross-cultural studies on the role of honor in emotion. She was awarded a post-doctoral research grant from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) to continue her work on honor cultures. She worked as a post-doctoral researcher and as Assistant Professor at the Department of Social Psychology, University of Amsterdam. She is currently Assistant Professor at the School of Social Sciences and Law, Brunel University, UK. Her research focuses on the interplay between culture and emotion. She does research on a variety of emotions: pride, shame, anger, envy, and happiness. She has studied emotions in a variety of cultures and geographical regions: Southern Europe, Northern Europe, North-Africa, Middle-East, the Caribbean islands, U.S.A. Her work on humiliation focuses on the role of this emotion in insult-related conflict. She is especially interested in the situational, cognitive, and behavioral correlates of humiliation.
Please see:
Humiliation and Honor, note presented at Round Table 1 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 15-16, 2005.
Humiliation and Racism, paper Presented at The National Conference on Racism in Global Context, 9th-11th November 2007, Murdoch University, Australia.
Rodriguez Mosquera, P.M., together with Agneta H. Fischer, Antony S. R. Manstead, and Ruud Zaalberg (2007), Attack, Disapproval, or Withdrawal? The Role of Honor in Anger and Shame Responses to Being Insulted, Cognition and Emotion, in press.
 
EVELIN G. LINDNER
Evelin Gerda Lindner is the Founding President of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network and initiator of the World Dignity University initiative. She is a transdisciplinary social scientist and humanist and holds two Ph.D.s, one in medicine and one in psychology. In 1996, she designed a research project on the concept of humiliation and its role in genocide and war. European history served as starting point.
 
webb
TONY WEBB
Tony Webb holds a PhD in Humanities/Trans Disciplinary Research from the University of Western Sydney based on a study exploring the social psychology of shame as the root of a wide range of personal and social crises. The study evolved from his work as a social activist that began in the 1970s working with homeless and unemployed people in the UK and that progressed through three decades of building local national and international campaigns and alliances between diverse groups on ecological, peace, public health, and industry policy issues. It sought to find answers to deeper questions of what motivates (and what inhibits) social engagement in these issues and related social issues.
The study explored current theories and models for social activism and frameworks for understanding and working with emotions as drivers for personal and social patterns of thought and behavior. It then explored the way that people experience these emotions, particularly the emotion of shame, and how they make sense of this experience. This  involved work with small groups of people including: men’s and women’s groups, social workers, ex-prisoners, domestic violence and drug addiction workers, counselors and therapists and people who felt that shame was an issue that needed exploring in the their lives. It developed simple experiential exercises that peeled off the layers of thoughts, feelings and behaviors that so often mask the core feeling of shame to show how it could and should function in an evolutionary sense to aid personal and social survival – and from the base of this experience of shame as normal, functional and health promoting, re-evaluate how so often it becomes seen as ‘toxic’ unhealthy, painful and as such overlaid with other feelings that mask its positive functions. It then outlined how this perspective on shame could be used to tackle a wide range of social issues (broadly covering aggression/violence; depression/suicide; alienation/isolation/apathy; and a wide range of addictions) and be applied in contexts such as the criminal justice system (e.g. restorative justice); work with domestic violence offenders and the broader areas of stopping violence between people, nations and cultures; in behavior change programs ranging from drug and alcohol addictions to unstitching patterns of thought and behavior at personal and social/cultural levels.
 

PAUL A. STOKES
Paul A. Stokes is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. He is part of the core HumanDHS Research Management Team.
Paul A. Stokes is a College Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at the National University of Ireland, Dublin, since 1996 and a member of the Faculty of Human Sciences in UCD. During the academic year 2000-2001 he was a Visiting Scholar at the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB). Dr. Stokes also acts as Consultant to Edelman Ireland PR in the area of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). He is furthermore a Fellow of the Cybernetics Society of Great Britain and a member of the Metaphorm on the Cybernetics of Governance based at the University of Sunderland. He is also a Board Member of the Collegium Humanun based in Zurich. For a number of years, Paul Stokes (together with colleagues - sociologists, psychoanalysts and group analytic therapists), has been investigating relations between Catholics and Protestants in Ireland with a view to deepening our understanding of the sources of the conflict in Northern Ireland. The particular focus was the state of social bonds between these groups and the role of shame and humiliation in this conflict.
Please see We Are All Humiliated, note presented at the 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, November 18-19, 2004. See also ‘The Troubles’ in Northern Ireland, 1968-2005: A Case of Mutual Humiliation, in Social Alternatives (Special Issue "Humiliation and History in Global Perspectives"), Vol. 25, No. 1, First Quarter, pp. 17-21, 2006.

 

ALICIA CABEZUDO
Alicia Cabezudo is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and part of the core HumanDHS Research Management Team.
Alicia is a Professor and Peace / Human Rights Educator and Consultant. Until recently, she was the Director of Educating Cities Latin America (International Relations Bureau, Municipality of Rosario, Argentina). The issue of humiliation is of deep concern to her because of the sufferings in the Latin-American region through dictatorship and torture. Her goal is to work on humiliation by trying to build a strong democratic consciousness – after the traumatic experiences of the region – from the individual and social point of view, and how to strengthen both individuals and societies in this direction. Her work as Director of Educating Cities – a strong international association developing educative programmes in cities – has given her the chance to work in Latin American Town Halls in order to approach this goal.

 

koury
MAURO KOURY
Mauro Guilherme Pinheiro Koury works with Anthropology of Emotions and is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. He is a Professor in the Department of Social Science at the Federal University of Paraíba, Brazil and Director of GREM – Research Group of Anthropology of Sociology of Emotions.
 

BERNARD HOFFERT
Professor Bernard Hoffert is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Professor Bernard Hoffert is the Head of Department of Fine Arts, and the Associate Dean of the External Affairs Faculty of Art and Design, at Monash University, Victoria, Australia. His paintings, installations and presentations have been in major international art events around the world. Bernard Hoffert is the author of four books, more than sixty catalogue essays and articles on art and art education, and more than 400 art reviews. He served as World President of the International Association of Art, UNESCO from 1992 to 1995 (the Association is the non-government organization of UNESCO which represents art and artists). He is also the Honorary President of the International Association of Art, UNESCO, and Honorary President of the Asia-Pacific Regional Council of the International Association of Art, UNESCO. Please see Combating Terror: Security through Art Education, paper presented at the 2006 UNESCO World Conference on Arts Education. Please see, furthermore, Innovation and Conflict: Finding Creative Solutions to Social Problems, a paper presented at HumanHDS, Monash University, 2006, and Creativity in the Service of Humanity: Design for an Equitable World, another paper presented at HumanHDS, Monash University, 2006.

 

EMANUELA DEL RE
Emanuela C. Del Re (1963) Emanuela C. Del Re (1963) is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
She is an Italian scholar specialized in geopolitics and security issues, who has been working on "terrorism" and in particular "religious terrorism" in the last few years focusing on the issue of "terrorists' profiling". Her interest in the link between security and religious issues dates back to the 1980s when she started carrying out long field researches in the field in New Religious Movements (in Europe, South Africa and in the Balkans). She has a somehow eclectic background as she started as a political and cultural anthropologist, but carrying out researches on field in conflict areas at a very early age (her first systematic field work research was carried out in the South African black townships of Mamelodi and Soweto in 1990), she slowly developed other interests under different scientific approaches that derived from the application of the method of participant observation, by which in her studies she tries to apply a multifaceted perspective that in her view allows a much deeper perception of the essence of a particular issue., She is professor at the Faculty of Communication Sciences (www.comunicazione.uniroma1.it) of the first University of Rome, named "La Sapienza". She is professor of International Relations within the Master's degree course on "Immigration and Refugees issues" (www.masterimmigrati.it) where she also organized a "International Crisis simulation". She has organized and directs a Jean Monnet module on " European Culture(s), Citizenship(s) and Governance" in the Faculty of Communication Sciences of the University "La Sapienza" of Rome. She teaches "Religious Terrorism's issues" in the Master's Degree Course "Human Rights and Conflict Management" of the School S. Anna of Pisa (Italy). She regularly lectures in various Italian and international courses organized by academic institutions as well as governmental institutions and NGOs. She is a presenter of papers and Keynote speaker on the themes of her researches in numerous conferences and seminars (European Parliament; London School of Economics; School for Slavonic and Eastern European Studies, London; Universities and Research Institutes in Italy; Central European University, Prague; University of Bielefeld; University of Tirana; University of Sofia; University of Budapest et al.). As an expert in Geopolitics and Security Issues, she acts as reference and consultant for Institutions such as, amongst others, the Italian Ministry of Interiors, Italian Ministry of Infrastructure and Transport, Italian Ministry of Production, Italian National Radio Network RAI and research institutes such as the Military Centre for Strategic Studies (Rome) and NOMISMA. She is a member and analyst of the European Stability Initiative (ESI). She is a member of the Network of Excellence Transfuse (www.transfuse-organization.org). She is a member of the International Society for the Sociology of Religion. She is a known expert in Balkan issues, having carried out long field researches in the area since 1991, focusing in particular on the Albanian question, in Albania, Kosovo, Montenegro and Macedonia, where she has followed closely the crises and conflicts that have taken place there in the last fifteen years. She has focused on themes such as: big connection axes in Europe and beyond (Pan-European Corridors, in particular V and VIII) and on geo-strategic and geopolitical implications of oil and oil pipelines, focusing in particular on Caspian Oil (field work in Azerbaijan). In the field of security studies, she is a known expert in trans-national and international illicit trafficking, with a particular focus on the link between illicit trafficking and conflicts, migration and illicit trafficking and illegal trafficking of women aimed at prostitution networks. She has obtained grants for her researches from various institutions, amongst which: Central European University (Prague), University "La Sapienza" of Rome, Military Centre for Strategic Studies (CeMISS, Rome), Department of Infrastructure and Transport ("Province" of Milan), European University Institute (Fiesole, Italy). She has vastly published in Italy and abroad, being the author of books and essays. She is the member of the editing committee and regular contributor of the leading Italian Geopolitical Review Limes (www.limesonline.com) and of the Italian Review of Intelligence Gnosis, the publication of the Italian Ministry of Interiors (www.sisde.it). In her international activity, she has also acted as International Electoral Observer since 1994 for UN, EU, OSCE in Bosnia, Albania, Yemen, South Africa, Algeria, Ukraine, Serbia, Kenya. In Algeria (1997) and Yemen (1997), also drafter of the final report. She has always kept a strong interest in the support of audiovisual techniques in her researches, and in fact she has been the director and author of the text of scientific video-documentaries. She is at the moment filming a documentary on the mutual perception of Jew, Muslim and Catholic teenagers in Europe.
Emanuela C. Del Re has two children, Giulio Claudio (8) and Michele Arjuna (4), who have already followed her on field in areas such as Kosovo, Albania, Azerbaijan, Macedonia, but also to western equally interesting areas, in terms of social and political analysis, such as western Europe and the USA.
Selected publications, volumes and CD Roms: Caspian Oil. An option of exploitation for the EU, Ministry of Infrastructure and Transport-ANAS, CD Rom, 2005; Il Corridoio V, Province of Milan, CD Rom, 2003; Corridor VIII. Realization, financing, works, impact, Ministry of Infrastructure and Transport-ANAS, 2003; Paneuropean Corridor VIII, Geopolitical and Geostrategical aspects, Military Centre for Strategic Studies, Rome, 2002, CD Rom; Albania punto a capo, SEAM, Rome, 1997; Albania on the wave of the years, Argo, Lecce,1995; Bread Salt and Heart. The Kanun of Lek Dukaginji amongst the people of the albanian mountains, Argo, Lecce, 1993.
Articles and essays: "Adriatico: scenari futuri", in: R. Pavia (a cura di) Adriatico Risorsa d'Europa, Regione Emilia Romagna, Ed. Diabasis, Reggio Emilia, 2007; "Migrazioni=terrorismo", in: Limes, n.4, 2007; "Il profilo del potenziale terrorista", in Gnosis, Rivista dell'Intelligence Italiana, n. 2, 2007; "Status del Kossovo. Alla vigilia di un'epoca", Forum, in: Gnosis, Rivista dell'Intelligence Italiana, n. 4, 2007; "Terrorismi e Religiosi", in Gnosis, Rivista di Intelligence italiana, n.2, 2006, pp.34-48, 2006; "Il crimine organizzato straniero, ovvero le mafie d'importazione", in: Gnosis, n.3, 2006, pp. 4-28; "Balcani ed Europa Orientale", Cucchi,G., A. Politi (a cura di), Nomos e Khaos. Rapporto Nomisma 2005 sulle prospettive economico-strategiche, A.G.R.A, Roma, 2006, pp.275-298; "Quanto costa lo status", in: Kosovo. Lo stato delle mafie, Limes, Quaderni speciali, n.6, 2006, pp.79-88; "Terrore e terrorismo internazionale. Breve excursus storico e tentativo di definire l'attualità", in: Rivista di Studi Politici Internazionali, n. 4, Ottobre-Dicembre, 2006, pp.608-619; "Guerre sante e guerra cosmica", in: Nomos e Khaos. Rapporto Nomisma 2006 sulle prospettive economico-strategiche, A.G.R.A., Roma, 2006, pp.253-274; "Energia geopolitica. Dall'Unione Europea all'Europa Sudorientale, passando per Russia e Turchia", in: Est-Ovest, Rivista di studi sull'Integrazione Europea, n.6, 2006, pp. 11-29; When our men arrive. Unmik's post-conflict administration of Kosovo, in: P. Siani-Davies (a cura di) Post-conflict Kosovo, Oxford University Press, Routledge, London, 2003; "I servizi segreti al G8", in Limes, n.3, 2001, pp.95-102; "Crimine e stato in Albania", in: Gli Stati mafia, LIMES, Numero speciale, n.2, 2000, pp.49-64; Albanian society in evolution. The migration factor, in: C. Lanni (ed.), Albania. A Country of Europe. The migration factor, Torino, EGA, 2000, pp. 9-43; " Albania: social, political and economic questions in the process of democratization", in: AWR Bulletin, n.1, 1999, pp.28-38; " Albania in transition: the question of identity and the customary law", in: Bianchini S., Schopflin G. (a cura di), State building in the Balkans. The dilemmas on the Eve of the XXI century, Longo, Ravenna, 1999, pp.167-194. Video-documentaries: Sangam. A River of Humanity at the Kumbh Mela, C.A.T.T.I.D., University of Rome "La Sapienza", 1995; The mountains, the qiri, and the Blessed Virigin, C.A.T.T.I.D., University of Rome "La Sapienza", 1993; In the light of the Elohim. The Raelian Movement: a UFO cult, C.A.T.T.I.D., University of Rome "La Sapienza", 1992.
Please see:
- Emanuela Del Re's contribution to the 2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict: The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Security
- The Subtle Connection Between Counter-terrorism Strategies and Humiliation, presentation held at the 2009 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 10-11, 2009.
• The Denied Yazidi Festival: The voice and future of the Yazidis, directed by Emanuela C. Del Re, EPOSchannel, published on 5th October 2014: Due to serious threats following terrorist attacks that had taken place in Iraqi Kurdistan in previous days, the Jazhna Jamaye, the most signficant religious festival of the Yazidi, ancient, peaceful and consistent minority in Iraqi Kurdistan, has been canceled by the authorities for security reasons. Out of the thousands of Yazidi from all over the world expected to gather in Lalish every October, in 2013 only a few hundreds have participated in the festival. Although the Rituals have been celebrated, and the spirituality of the event has pervaded the place, the Yazidi have suffered for the cancellation of the event. In this unique and exclusive documentary the Yazidi share their thoughts about their life and values, providing a deep insight in the world of a little known community. They also talk about their fears for the future: a prelude of the tragedy that is taking place today in August 2014, with the Yazidi risking a new genocide.
 
ROSITA ALBERT
Rosita Albert is a Visiting Scholar in the Social Psychology area of the Psychology Department at Harvard, and her research focuses on Intercultural Relations and Intercultural Conflicts. She is also an Associate Professor in the pioneering program in Intercultural Communication at the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Minnesota. She is a Founding Fellow and a member of the Governing Board of the International Academy for Intercultural Research. She is originally from Brazil, and her mother and grandparents left Germany to escape from Hitler. It is because of this background that she works to create respectful relations among groups from different backgrounds.
As to her educational background and her positions, Rosita Albert earned her Ph.D. in Social Psychology from the University of Michigan. She has taught in Psychology, Education and Communication at a number of Universities.
Rosita Albert has conducted research in a variety of topics, including research on a) the development and evaluation of the Intercultural Sensitizer, an instrument designed to foster intercultural sensitization; b) interactions between Latin Americans/Latinos and North or Anglo-Americans; c) the experiences and difficulties of Asian employees in American companies; d) conflicts and mutual misperceptions between African-Americans and Koreans in the U.S.; e) cultural differences in perceptions of negotiation; f) the effect of intercultural courses on intercultural development; and f) the effect of online interactions on perceptions of the other.
With respect to teaching, training and consulting, Rosita Albert has taught courses in social psychology, intercultural communication, negotiation, and diversity. These courses have included students from many fields, countries all over the world, and a very wide range of cultures. She has conducted intercultural and diversity training, given presentations, and consulted for a number of organizations, including the World Bank, the 3-M company, Booz Allen Hamilton, the National Association of Transplant Coordinators, the University of São Paulo, the University of Minnesota and a number of other institutions.
As to languages and international/intercultural experience, Rosita Albert speaks Portuguese, French, Spanish and English, and has had extensive experience with cultures from many parts of the world.
Please see Violent Interethnic Conflict and Human Dignity: Major Issues in Intercultural Research and Knowledge Utilization, the abstract she presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 14-15, 2006.
 

tuli
KALAISH TULI
Prof. Kailash Tuli is a veteran psychologist from New Delhi where he had 33 years of teaching, research, counseling and mentoring with students. He has Masters and Doctorate in Psychology from Delhi University and during 1995-96 he was on Senior Post-Doctoral Fellowship at Vienna University. His intense interest in Yoga, Gestalt and Psychology brought him in contact with world renowned therapy groups like Gestalt Education Network International (GENI) of Frankfurt and Gestalt Associate Therapists Los Angles (GATLA) of USA. He has presented three times before The Association for the Advancement of Gestalt Therapy (AAGT) at Vancouver and Philadelphia. He is working on the concept of Global Gestalt (GG) in which he is formulating the principles of Gestalt at Global level in order to achieve harmony, order, symmetry and other gestalt parameters at world level. He worked as Professor of Psychology and also Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management at Delhi University, IILM, and Amity University in India.
His academic activities include writing a book and chapters in books, research articles, and guiding dissertations etc. He was the presenter for the paper at 15th Conference of HDHD at Istanbul (April, 2010) with his wife Prof. Mohini Tuli, entitled, Humiliation in the Indian Context: Effectiveness of Zeitgeist to Inculcate Human Dignity. Currently he is actively looking for research collaborations.
 

edwards
LYNNE EDWARDS
Lynne Edwards is the Director and Coordinator of the Napier HumanDHS Group. She is currently working in the field of employee well-being as the Knowledge Transfer Project Developer and Co-ordinator in the Edinburgh Human Resource Academy, Napier University Business School where her remit is to focus on employee well being. In this context she is particularly keen to further develop her earlier work on young people and bereavement and is now looking at bereavement in the workplace given the changing workplace demographic including migration and asylum issues. Lynne is also planning to develop earlier work on bullying, where she focussed on primary and secondary schools and now plans to look at bullying in the workplace, particularly in health care settings.
Lynne has co-designed and is developing two third year modules for the MSc in Social Research in the School of Health and Social Science that builds on her skills and knowledge in working in collaboration with people who use mental health services. The modules are: Participation and Action in Health Research and Ethical Issues in Health Research. The course is designed for health professionals as continuing professional development and will give them practical knowledge and action directly useful to their work in organisations and the community. They will be enabled to analyse the levels of empowerment primary in health services through the use of owned experience which give rise to the ethical issues in engaging under-represented groups in the research process.
Lynne is also one of Her Majesty's Commissioners for Mental Health (part -time), and on the Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland (MWCS). The MWCS is an independent organisation working to safeguard the rights and welfare of everyone with a mental illness, learning disability or other mental disorder. The duties of the MWCS are set out in the Mental Health (Care and Treatment) ( Scotland ) Act 2003. Lynne is on the Management Group, the Investigations and Inquiries Group and the Child and Adolescent Group. As part of her work on the MWCS she visits people in both hospital and community settings to check on their care and treatment and to make sure that healthcare staff are operating the principles of the 2003 Act.
She has recently completed research that looked at how Independent Advocacy Services have been impacted by the 2003 Act. Independent Advocacy Services support mental health and learning disabled service users to have their voices heard and listened to in healthcare settings and in hearings held under the 2003 Act.
She has an interest in the involvement of vulnerable people and external partners working as collaborative leaders in the development of mental health services and the education of health professionals. As part of this interest she is currently involved in the Scottish Government's Delivering for Change: Mental Health Leadership Programme where she is the Functional Set Leader for the Mental Health Service User Leaders. This involves building the leadership skills of service users and their development/support workers through the use of action learning.
Lynne was appointed as a visiting Research Fellow in the Centre for Family and community Medicine/ Migration Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm in 2006 where she will work in collaboration with Dr Salma Siddique, an expert in medical anthropology and visiting Reader.
From 2003 to 2005 she was involved in developing a partnership of service users, carers and mental health nurse lecturers to work together on projects to enhance the education of mental health nurses. These projects gained national recognition for innovative practice.
During the previous 18 years she held academic research posts with Aberdeen University and the Scottish Council for Research in Education (SCRE), latterly the SCRE Centre, Glasgow University. Here she began her work in the areas of adolescent bereavement, bullying and the emotional well being of young people. She also worked on a wide variety of externally funded projects in the field of child, adolescent and adult education.
She has held a number of consultancy posts including the social inclusion of people with long term mental health problems, to carers of people with mental health problems and Mental Health Officer training.
At Aberdeen University she researched on decision making in the field of nuclear power developments and land planning implications.
Lynne is also a trained careers adviser, holding a diploma in careers guidance.
Selected Publications:
•  2005 Edwards, L. in Tew, J; Gell, G and Foster, S. (eds) Learning from Experience; a good practice guide. A Strategy for Involvement: service user and carer involvement in mental health education: a good practice guide. Mental Health in Higher Education.
•  2003 Ewards, L; Dockrell, A and Powney, J. Supporting Bereaved Young People: a support pack. SCRE Centre, Glasgow University.
•  2000 Powney, J; McPake,J; Edwards; L and Hamilton, S. Gender Equality and Lifelong Learning. Equal Opportunities Scotland.
•  1992 Johnstone, M; Munn, P and Edwards L. Action Against Bullying: a support pack for schools. SCRE Scottish Office Education Department.
•  1980 Edwards, L and Rowan-Robinson, J. Whatever Happened to the Planning Inquiry Commission? Journal of Planning and Environment Law.
• 
1994 Edwards, L(ed), Munn, P and Fogelman (co-eds) Education for Democratic Citizenship in Europe - New Challenges for Secondary Education. NITRA Council of Europe. Swetts & Zeitlinger bv.
•  1979 Pearce, D. W; L, Edwards and Beuret G. Decision Making for Energy Futures. McMillan London.
 

MYRA MENDIBLE
Myra Mendible is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Myra was born in Havana, Cuba, and moved to the US as a child. Mendible earned a Ph.D. (with honors) in American Literature and Culture Studies from the University of Miami in 1993 and then joined Florida Gulf Coast University as founding faculty in 1994. In this capacity she contributed to the design of the University's Interdisciplinary Liberal Studies degree, which introduces students to a series of social, political, and cultural issues in their historical contexts; she also served as co-founder of the English program, developing curriculum, formulating goals and outcomes, and serving in an administrative capacity as English Program Leader. Dr. Mendible has presented her interdisciplinary research at both national and international conferences. In 1996, for example, she delivered a paper at the University of Havana, where she reconnected with the land of her birth. In the summer of 2004, she participated in an invitation-only roundtable on Womens Leadership at Oxford University in the UK, where she spoke on the issue of gendered humiliation. Dr. Mendible has published in a variety of peer-reviewed journals, including Genders: Innovative Work in the Arts, Humanities and Social Theories; International Fiction Review; Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction; Florida Law Review; Feminist Media Studies, and the Journal of American Culture. She is currently working on a book tentatively titled, Mediated Humiliations: Culture, Politics, and the New Mass Media and is the Editor of a forthcoming anthology on the history of Latinas representations in US film and media (University of Texas Press).
Please see:
• Mediated Humiliations: Spectacles of Power in Postmodern Culture
Abstract presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 15-16, 2005.

• Post Vietnam Syndrome: National Identity, War, and the Politics of Humiliation, in Radical Psychology, Vol. 7, 2008.
 

JIUQUAN HAN
Jiuquan Han is Associate Professor of Linguistics in College of Foreign Languages, Hebei Agricultural University. During 1985-1989, he was educated as an English major in the Department of Foreign Languages, Hebei Teachers University. While teaching English in Hebei Agricultural University, Handan Branch, he was thirsty for reading any interesting book in the fields of aesthetics, law and philosophy. During 2002-2006, he was educated as a part-time graduate in the Department of English, Beijing International Studies University, where he read cognitive linguistics, cognitive psychology, psychoanalysis and anthropology. And he comes to understand that it is impossible to probe human's nature without comprehending the schematization or conceptualization process of a certain idea which guides human being's behavior.
His major works are:
• A cognitive view of the Number Complex in ancient Chinese Culture, paper presented at the Second International Conference on Multicultural Discourses, 13-15th April 2007, at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, China.
• "Five Penalties": A Psychological-Cultural-Social-Historical Construct
Paper presented at the 2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 13-14, 2007.
 

BRIAN J. TRAUTMAN
Brian J. Trautman is a doctoral student in the educational leadership and change program at Fielding Graduate University. His dissertation research is focused on education initiatives using ‘The Earth Charter’. Brian is an adjunct faculty member with the peace and world order studies program at Berkshire Community College. His primary research interests are peace education, social and ecological justice studies, and human rights education. Brian also holds a strong interest in Indigenous worldview studies.
 

EDWARD NEWMAN
Edward Newman is the Academic Programme Officer and Director of Studies on Conflict and Security at the United Nations University in Tokyo. He was educated in the United Kingdom at the University of Keele and the University of Kent, where he received a Ph.D. in International Relations. He has taught in Japan, as a lecturer at Shumei University and Aoyama Gakuin University, and has been a Research Associate at the University of Tokyo. He is also a founding executive editor of the journal International Relations of the Asia Pacific, published by Oxford University Press. Recent publications include The UN Role in Promoting Democracy: Between Ideals and Reality (co-edited, UNU Press, 2004), Refugees and Forced Displacement: International Security, Human Vulnerability, and the State (co-edited, UNU Press, 2003), Recovering from Civil Conflict: Reconciliation, Peace and Development (co-edited, Frank Cass, 2002), Democracy in Latin America: (Re)Constructing Political Society (co-edited, UNU Press, 2001), The United Nations and Human Security (co-edited, Palgrave, 2001), and The UN Secretary-General from the Cold War to the New Era (Macmillan, 1998), The Changing Nature of Democracy (co-edited UNU Press, 1998). His articles have appeared in a number of journals, including Global Dialogue, International Peacekeeping, The International Journal of Human Rights, International Studies Perspectives, Japan Review of International Affairs, Journal of East Asian Studies, and Security Dialogue.

 

ASHRAF SALAMA
Ashraf Salam is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, and the Director and Coordinator of the HumanDHS World Architecture for Equal Dignity project.
Dr. Ashraf Salama is Professor of Architecture in the Architectural Engineering Program of Qatar University in Doha. Prior to that, he was Associate Professor of Architecture at the Department of Architecture, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals-KFUPM. He was the Director of Research and Consulting at Adams Group Consultants in Charlotte, North Carolina, USA (2001-04). He is a licensed architect in Egypt, trained at Al Azhar University and North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA. He is Associate Professor of Architecture, Al Azhar University, Cairo (on leave of absence), and former Chairman of the Department of Architecture, Misr International University in Cairo (1996-01). Dr. Salama has written over 50 articles and papers in local and international conferences and archival journals, and trade magazines; published three books on Architectural Education: Designing the Design Studio, Human Factors in Environmental Design, and Architectural Education Today; delivered lectures and presentations in over 25 countries; and contributed widely to international publications. He was member of the UIA/UNESCO International Committee of Architectural Education, and the Director of Architectural Education Work Program of the International Union of Architects-UIA (1995-00). He is currently co-Convener of the International Association for People-Environments Studies-IAPS Education Network.
He was the recipient of the first award of the International Architecture Design Studio, University of Montreal, Canada, 1990, and in 1998 he won the Paul Chemetove Prize for his project on Architecture and the Eradication of Poverty, a United Nations International Ideas Competition. Dr. Salama served as a consultant to the Egyptian Ministries of Tourism and Culture. He also served as member in the international jury for projects within the context of the revitalization of Sarajevo, Bosnia, and a UIA Jury member in the international competition on designing a central urban park in La Paz, Bolivia. He has been appointed a technical reviewer for the Aga Khan Award for Architecture in Geneva, Award Cycle (1998-01). Salama has been involved with the Community Development Group of the College of Design, North Carolina State University (1993-95). His academic experience includes teaching courses on Programming and Space Planning, Research and Design Methods, Applications of Socio-Behavioral Studies in Design, and Interior Design, Architectural and Community Design Studios. His professional experience includes consultancy for several government and public agencies, and managing design projects from inception through programming and space planning, encountering users and environmental constraints. His recent research places emphasis on design studio teaching practices, and workplace and learning environments.
Please see some of Dr. Ashraf Salama's work here:
•  Incorporating Knowledge about Cultural Diversity into Architectural Pedagogy (1999).
•  Skill-Based / Knowledge-Based Architectural Pedagogies: An Argument for Creating Humane Environments, paper given by Ashraf Salama at the 7th International Conference on Humane Habitat-ICHH-05 – The International Association of Humane Habitat IAHH, Rizvi College of Architecture, Mumbai, India, January 29-31, 2005.
•  Shores of the Mediterranean: Architecture as a Language of Peace, co-edited by Ashraf Salama with colleagues from Napoli, Italy, Donatella Mazzoleni, Giuseppe Anzani, Marichela Sepe, and Maria Maddalena Simone, 2005. Intra Moenia, Rome and Naples, Italy: Edizioni.
•  Patterns of Change in Work Environments: A Process-Employee Centered Paradigm, introductory speech given by Ashraf Salama at the 8th International Conference of IAHH-the International Association for Humane Habitat- Sustainable and Humane Workplaces. Mumbay, India, January 27-29, 2006.
•  Architecture as Language of Peace: Democracy and Collaborative Design Processes, a short course by Dr. Ashraf Salama.
•  PLADEW: A Tool for Teachers Awareness of School Building Sustainability: The Case of Carmel School, Mathews, North Carolina, in the Global Built Environment Review-GBER, International Center for Development and Environment Studies ICDES, Vol. 5, 2005, Issue (1), Edge Hill, Lancashire, United Kingdom. ISSN 1474 6824.
•  A Process Oriented Design Pedagogy: KFUPM Sophomore Studio, in the Journal of the Center for Education in the Built Environment-CEBE Transactions, University of Cardiff, Vol. 2, 2005, Issue (2), Cardiff, United Kingdom. ISSN 1745-0322.
•  Design Studio Teaching Practices: Between Traditional, Revolutionary, and Virtual Models, with Guest Editor Ashraf Salama, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture, in Open House International (OHI) (Academic Refereed Journal), Special Issue, Volume 31, No.3, September 2006 (Contact "Carol Nicholson" Carol.Nicholson@ribaenterprises.com).
•  Symbolism and Identity in the Eyes of Arabia’s Budding Professionals, in LAYERMAG... An Online Magazine on Architecture, Art, and Design, and Media Studies.
•  A Lifestyle Theories Approach for Affordable Housing Research in Saudi Arabia, in the Emirates Journal for Engineering Research, Vol. 11, 2006, Issue (1), United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, UAE.
•  Learning from the Environment: Evaluation Research and Experience Based Architectural Pedagogy, in the Journal of the Center for Education in the Built Environment-CEBE Transactions, University of Cardiff, Vol. 3, 2006, Issue (1), Cardiff, United Kingdom. ISSN 1745-0322.
•  A Typological Perspective: The Impact of Cultural Paradigmatic Shifts on the Evolution of Courtyard Houses in Cairo, in the Journal of the Faculty of Architecture, Middle East Technical University. Vol. 23, 2006, Issue (1). METU-JFA, Ankara, Turkey.
•  Ashraf is the Chief-Editor of the new Journal ArchNet-IJAR, an interdisciplinary scholarly online publication of architecture, planning, and built environment studies. Please see here an outline and the submission notes to authors. The journal aims at establishing a bridge between theory and practice in the fields of architectural and design research, and urban planning and built environment studies. It reports on the latest research findings innovative approaches for creating responsive environments, with special focus on developing countries. The journal has two international boards; advisory and editorial. The range of knowledge and expertise of the boards members ensures high quality scholarly papers and allows for a comprehensive academic review of contributions that span wide spectrum of issues, methods, theoretical approach and architectural and development practices.
•  New Book! Design Studio Pedagogy: Horizons for the Future, by Ashraf M. Salama and Nicholas Wilkinson (editors), Gateshead, Tyne and Wear, UK: The Urban International Press (2007). ISBN: 1-872811-09-04. The Urban International Press, P.O Box 74, Gateshead, Tyne & Wear, NE9 5UZ, UK. e-mail Carol Nicholson: carol.nicholson[@]ribaenterprises.com for more information.

 

babaciwilhite
ZEHLIA BABACI-WILHITE
Zehlia Babaci-Wilhite is also a Member of the HumanDHS Education Team.
Dr. Zehlia Babaci-Wilhite is a multi-lingual educator and researcher with a Doctorate in Education and Development from the University of Oslo (UiO), Norway. Her research interests include Language and Rights in Education, Development Aid and African Higher Education. Her dissertation explores the consequences of linguistic choices for quality education as a right in education. With more than 20 years of teaching experience in multiple countries including France, USA, Japan, India, and Norway, her strength lies in international learning, development, and human rights. She has supervised numerous master theses in Comparative and International Education. She is the author of many published articles in tier one academic journals and book chapters. Dr. Babaci-Wilhite has presented her papers at prestigious international conferences as well as invited guest lecturer. She has been a member of the Language of Instruction in Tanzania and South Africa (LOITASA) team of researchers, and, as LOITASA member, has presented her work at workshops in Tanzania and South Africa. Currently, she is a visiting scholar at the Graduate School of Education and at the Lawrence Hall of Science at the University of California-Berkeley.
Please see:
•  Language As a Right in Education: A Case Study of Zanzibar Curriculum Reform, abstract presented by Zehlia Babaci-Wilhite &  MacLeans Geo-JaJa at the 2011 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 8-9, 2011.
•  Preservation of local languages-in-education: Why not in Africa?, abstract presented at the 2012 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 6-7, 2012. See video recording.
•  Search for Dignity by Implementing African Languages in African School, abstract presented at the 21st Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies "Search for Dignity," in South Africa, 25th - 28th April 2013. See a video of her presentation on Day Three of the conference, 26th April 2013.
•  Giving Space to African Voices: Rights in Local Languages and Local Curriculum. Rotterdam, The Netherlands: Sense, 2014, edited by Zehlia Babaci-Wilhite.
 

EINAR STRUMSE
Einar Strumse is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and the HumanDHS Architecture Team.
Einar Strumse
(Cand. Psychol. and PhD in psychology) is associate professor of psychology and head of the psychology programme at the Lillehammer University College (LUC). He is also adjunct associate professor of environmental psychology at the University of Bergen. Since 1990 his research in the field of environmental psychology has focused upon landscape preference/landscape aesthetics, environmental attitudes and predictors of environmental behaviors.
Please see:
• Summary of the Special Session on the Role Played by Human Dignity and Humiliation for Environmental Psychology, presented at 11th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Norway , 23rd June -1st July, 2008.
 
SIMON SOUYRIS STRUMSE
Simon Souyris Strumse graduated from a music option with an exam in classical piano. After that he's spent one year at the Nansen Academy - Norwegian Humanistic Academy, where he studied politics, culture, philosophy, conflict resolution and dialogue. Since then he has been active in the refugee board of SOS Racism, working with norwegian refugee policy, and now works in the central committee of The Socialist Youth League of Norway as the head of international relations. In 2009 he hopes to finish his bachelor program at the University College of Oslo.
Other than that he has been working as an intern in "The NGO Platform on Shipbreaking", a global coalition of human rights and environmental NGOs working for safe and environmentally sound shipbreaking, is an elected representative both in his local municipality and at the Oslo University College.
Simon is a notorious activist and believes that durable change is only possible when every one of us change our own societies.
"Therefore it is of utter importance that people be provided with the insight and the tools necessary to change their own life and their surroundings." - Simon S. Strumse
 
BAHIJA JAMAL
 
BJØRN AKSEL FLATÅS
Bjørn Aksel Flatås is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
He is the Director of Research of the Falstad Center, near Levanger in Trøndelag, the middle of Norway. Falstad is a building complex that was erected in 1921 as a special school for delinquent boys. In 1941, the building was confiscated and transformed into a prison camp by the German SS Nazi-occupiers. About 5000 people from thirteen nations were imprisoned here in the period of 1941 to 1945. Most were Norwegian political prisoners. Approximately 220 prisoners were executed in the forest nearby in the period of 1942 to 1943. After the liberation of Norway, Falstad prison camp was transformed into a forced labor camp. Over three thousand members of the Norwegian Nazi Party served their sentence here. Falstad Museum opened in 1995, celebrating the 50th anniversary of liberation. Falstad Memorial and Human Rights Center was established in 2000. Education, documentation and communication concerning the history of imprisonment during World War II and Human Rights constitute the core activities of the Center. The Falstad Archive consists of objects and documents originating from the prison camp.
 
KATRINE FANGEN
Katrine Fangen is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Katrine Fangen, Ph.D., is a Professor in Sociology at the Department of Sociology of the University of Oslo. She has published several books and journal articles within the research-field of racism, national, political and ethnic identity, stigmatisation and youth subcultures.
Her MA-thesis was a study of three political youth groups in Eastern Germany in the period before, during and after the unification of the two German states (in 1990). This study examines the adaptation strategies and identity work among east-German communist youth, anarchist youth and neo-Nazi youth from Berlin, Leipzig and Weimar.
Fangen's PhD thesis (Pride and Power - a Sociological Interpretation of the Norwegian Radical Nationalist Underground Movement, Department of Sociology, University of Oslo, 1999) is a study of Norwegian neo-Nazi youths, which, similar to her MA-thesis, is based on a combination of participant observation (one year) and in depth interviews. This thesis examines identity work, ideology, style, violence, gender-differences and interpersonal interaction among the Neo-Nazis. Attention is also paid to how society can prevent these kinds of groupings, and how one can encourage young people who join these groups to leave. This study is also published in two Norwegian books:
•  A Book About Neo-Nazism Oslo : Universitetsforlaget, 2001.
•  Behind Neo-Nazism Oslo : Cappelen, 2002.
It is as well published (among others) in the following journal articles and book-chapters:
•  'Separate or Equal? The Emergence of an All-Female Group in Norway 's Rightist Underground', Terrorism & Political Violence 9:3, 1997.
•  'Right-Wing Skinheads. Binary Oppositions and Working-Class Nostalgia', Young (Nordic Youth Research Journal) No. 3, 1998.
•  'On the Margin of Life. Life-Stories of Far-Right Activists' Acta Sociologica, No. 4, 1999.
•  "'Radical nationalism': What are the key contemporary conceptual and theoretical issues?" Sosiologisk årbok, nr. 1, årgang 5.1, 2000.
•  'Living out our Ethnic Instincts. Ideological Beliefs among Right-Wing Activists in Norway ', Jeffrey Kaplan and Tore Bjørgo: Nation and Race: The Developing Euro-American Racist Subculture; Boston : Northeastern University Press, 1998.
•  'A Death Mask of Masculinity. The Brotherhood of Norwegian Right-Wing Skinheads', Søren Ervø and Thomas Johansson (eds.) Among Men. Moulding Masculinities vol. 1 (Hants: Ashgate Publ. Ltd., 2003).
•  'Eastern Germany 1990. Youthculture as adaption to a changing society' in: Manuela du Bois-Reymond, Lynne Chisholm, Sibylle Hübner-Funk, Burkhardt Sellin (eds.): Youth in the European Context. A Scientific Reader,1994.
Finally, Fangen has published research reports on forced marriages and a study of living conditions and life quality among people suffering from HIV/AIDS. She has also published several research reports on racism and integration of immigrants. Apart from her PhD-thesis, her main publication so far is a lecture book in participant observation which has been published in Norwegian and Swedish:
•  Deltagende observasjon[Participant Observation], Oslo: Fagbokforlaget, 2004.
•  Deltagande observation[Participant Observation], Stockholm: Liber förlag, 2005.
Katrine's present study is a five year long study of identity work, integration and mental health among Norwegian Somali immigrants.
Please see Humiliation Experienced by Somali Immigrants in Norway
In Journal of Refugee Studies, 19 (1, March), 2006; Katrine developed this article from a paper presented at the Annual Meeting of Humiliation Studies, Maison des Hommes, Paris, 15th-18th of September, 2004.
 

torres
WALTER TORRES
Walter J. Torres Ph.D. is a Nicaraguan-American clinical and forensic psychologist who practices in Denver, Colorado. He graduated from the University of Colorado in Boulder, where he studied Descriptive Psychology under Peter Ossorio. His interest in the study of humiliation developed in the context of treating injured workers after he observed that the most severely depressed workers were those who had suffered a humiliation in the context of their injury and their treatment. Utilizing concepts of Descriptive Psychology, he developed with Ray Bergner, Ph.D. a novel formulation of humiliation that was published in 2010 in the Journal of the Academy of Psychiatry and the Law. Dr. Torres and Dr. Bergner are currently writing on the psychotherapeutic treatment of the humiliated.
 

ØYVIND EIKREM
Øyvind Eikrem (b. 1973), Ph.D., is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Øyvind is the head (instituttstyrer) of the Institute of Culture and Humanities (Institutt for kultur- og humanistiske fag, IKH) at the Telemark University College (Høgskolen i Telemark), in Bø, Telemark. Earlier, he has been Associate Professor of Social Sciences and of Mental Health at the University College of Stord/Haugesund, Norway. He studied social anthropology, clinical psychology and philosophy at The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, ending up with postgraduate degrees in all three fields. Eikrem obtained his PhD in 2005 from the same institution on a dissertation on the magic and mythic dimensions of modern economic life.
Eikrem has done extensive ethnographic fieldwork in The Netherlands Antilles and in Colombia. His research has focused on ethnicity and identity, economic anthropology, psychological anthropology, the psychological consequences of Colombian violence and terror, the nature of health and its cultural variability, and on the theory of the social sciences. He also has strong interests in art and philosophy, having published on the philosophies of Foucault, Nietzsche and Schopenhauer, among others.
Eikrem has a private practice as a clinical psychologist and he is also a member of the NGO Building Peaces, working closely with Rais Neza Boneza and Vegar Jordanger. He is married and has a daughter.
 

JENNIFER S. GOLDMAN-WETZLER
Dr. Jennifer S. Goldman-Wetzler is also a member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Dr. Jennifer Goldman-Wetzler is an organizational psychologist and founder of Alignment Strategies Group, a NYC-based firm that consults to senior leaders in a wide range of industries, including global corporate, non-profit and governmental organizations, on issues of conflict, negotiation and organizational change and renewal. Jennifer is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Organization and Leadership at Teachers College, Columbia University and an executive coach with the Program on Social Intelligence at Columbia Business School. She is the author of Emotions in Long-term Conflict (Lap Lambert Publishing, 2014) and has written articles and chapters on leadership and conlfict in various publications including Chief Learning Officer Magazine, International Journal of Conflict Management and The Handbook of Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice, Second Edition. For more information please visit www.alignmentstrategiesgroup.com.
Jennifer has conducted extensive research on the role of emotions in protracted conflict. Her dissertation The Differential Effects of Collective- Versus Personal-level Humiliating Experiences focused on the role humiliation plays in exacerbating conflict.
Dr. Goldman's research has been supported by a multi-year Fellowship from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, a Pre-doctoral Fellowship from the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), and grants from BeyondIntractability.org and the Office of Policy & Research and the Dean's Office at Teachers College, Columbia University.
In addition, Dr. Goldman is an organizational psychologist and executive coach with over a decade of experience serving clients in corporate, academic, and non-profit contexts. She is recognized for enabling individuals to successfully negotiate and manage conflict and to align personal values with day-to-day decisions to produce extraordinary results for the mselves and their constituencies. Dr. Goldman has served as Director of Negotiation Programs at Mediation Works Inc., a dispute resolution organization based in Boston, has taught in the internationally acclaimed Program of Instruction for Lawyers at Harvard Law School, and has served as a mediator in the District Court Department of the Massachusetts Trial Court. She earned her B.A. from Tufts University and her Ph.D. in Social-Organizational Psychology from Columbia University.
Please see:
Peter T. Coleman and Jennifer Goldman, Conflict and Humiliation, note presented at the 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, November 18-19, 2004.
How Humiliation Fuels Intractable Conflict: The Effects of Emotional Roles on Recall and Reactions to Conflictual Encounters by Jennifer S. Goldman and Peter T. Coleman, work in progress, Teachers College, Columbia University, 2005.
A Theoretical Understanding of How Emotions Fuel Intractable Conflict: The Case of Humiliation by Jennifer S. Goldman and Peter T. Coleman (2005), paper presented at Round Table 2 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 15-16, 2005.
Humiliation and Aggression, abstract prepared by Jennifer Goldman for Round Table 2 of the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 14-15, 2006.

 

SOPHIE SCHAARSCHMIDT
Sophie Schaarschmidt is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, and the HumanDHS Education Team.
She was born nearby Dresden, Germany, 27 years ago. She has lived and studied in several countries, including Great Britain, Netherlands and Malta. She is a doctorate student of psychology working at the "FernUniversität" in Hagen, Germany (a distance learning university).
Sophie writes: In my free time I've been actively involved in the Youth Programme of the European Commission (EC) by volunteering, setting up (inter)national youth projects and training. Over the last years I have become interested in the co-operation between Europe and the Middle East. My Master thesis focussed on differences in cultural values of youth and youth workers engaging in the Euro-Mediterranean Youth Programme of the EC which aims at creating co-operative youth projects in both regions. I was involved in establishing CYT (Conyoungtion) association, a Dutch based association that facilitates and implements intercultural youth projects with a specific focus on cooperation with partners from the Middle East.
My dissertation will now focus on (emotional) barriers in dialogue between youth from Israel and Palestine, which is of specific interest for me.
I've visited Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories (Westbank) several times, and I've lived there for a period of 3 months. For my future I envision to get involved in projects in that region that are aimed at creating an atmosphere for and facilitating dialogue for peaceful change.
I like working in the spirit of the HumanDHS group because I really believe that here we're dealing with a core issue of human relations and peace, be it in the micro or the macro level. I feel very connected to the vision and concept and the ambition to research, publish and put into practise models of how human relations can improve through mutual respect, dignity and appreciation and the avoidance of humiliation, counterhumiliation, shaming and blaming. This connects very well with the concept of non-violent communication which I find very important and valuable, especially in the field of peace work.
Please see here some of Sophie's publications:
•  Cognitive and Emotional Ingroup-identification of Youth in Israel and Palestine, note presented at Round Table 1 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 15-16, 2005.
•  Samen in Zee: Israelis and Palestinians in the Same Boat Camp.
•  Contribution presented at the 2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 13-14, 2007.
 

sayler
MICHAEL SAYLER
Michael Sayler is a minister in Colorado Springs, Colorado. His dissertation at the Fielding Graduate Institute is entitled Humiliation and the Poor: A Study in the Management of Meaning (Ph.D. dissertation, Fielding Graduate Institute, 2004, available through the University of Michigan dissertation service), a study of how homeless people (in an affluent society) manage the meaning of humiliating experiences.
 

TINA OTTMAN
Esta Tina Ottman is also a Member of the HumanDHS's Global Core Team, and Director and Coordinator of HumanDHS's World Films for Equal Dignity Project.
Born in Manchester, UK, and educated at Oxford University, Tina Ottman is the daughter of a German Kindertransport refugee, and has worked in teaching, journalism and publishing for over two decades. She lived for around a decade in Israel as a new immigrant, and has now been lecturing at Japanese universities for 11 years.
Currently Tina Ottman is Associate Professor at the School of Government (in the School of Law ) at Kyoto University, Japan. She attempts to balance research interests in Israel/Palestine/gender with labour activism, and is a coordinator of the Japan conference series Peace as A Global Language.
Please see:
•  Culture and Conflict in Academic Organizations: A Comparative Field Analysis of two Disputes in Japan, co-authored with Lisa Rogers, in ICS - Intercultural Communication Studies, XIX (3), 2010, pp. 74-87.
 

DONNA FUJIMOTO
Donna Fujimoto is Associate Professor at Osaka Jogakuin College in Osaka, Japan where she teaches English as a Foreign Language, Intercultural Communication and Human Rights courses. She was born in the U.S. and has lived in Japan for over 26 years, and this experience prompted her to organize a study group of other long-term Nikkei residents of Japan (Nikkei means people of Japanese heritage). Donna has been in the field of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) for over 30 years, and she has an M.A. from the Department of Second Language Studies, University of Hawaii, and is a doctoral candidate at Temple University, Japan. She is the Chair of the Intercultural Communication Interest Section of TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages), Co-Publicity Chair for the Pragmatics Special Interest Group of JALT (Japan Association of Language Teaching), Co-Program Chair of SIETAR Kansai chapter (Society of Intercultural Education, Training and Research), and Coordinator of the Contrast Culture Method, an intercultural training group. She is currently involved in research on Conversation Analysis, Nikkei-related topics, Intercultural Communication and issues about racism and teachers in Japan.
 
EDWARD J. EMERY
Edward J. Emergy is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and HumanDHS Education Team.
He is the Chief Representative to the United Nations for World Information Transfer, an international NGO in Genral Consultative Status with the Economic and Social Council at the United Nations. He is also a Senior Partner with Ethical Futures and a psychoanalyst in private practice. Dr. Emery has lectured and taught internationally. Please see:
•  An Ethics of Engagement: Shame and the Genesis of Violence, paper presented at a Conference of the Peacemaker Corps Association in Honor of Sergio Vieira de Mello "Peacemaking in the Family: Nuclear, Community and Global" United Nations Headquarters, February 27, 2004. Forthcoming in Psychotherapy and Politics International in 2004 (2) 3.
•  Musings on Shame and Idolization, abstract presented at the 2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 13-14, 2007.
 
LENE HULBAKVIKEN LAFOSSE
Lene Hulbakviken Lafosse is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and HumanDHS Education Team.
Her current project is titled "Stories of trauma, a study of space for action and possibilites." Through the telling of life stories she will show the implications of trauma in the life of young adults/adults from the Middle-East and/or North Africa presently living in Norway.
Her project will be presented as a her thesis for the Cand. Polit. degree at the Institute of Social Anthropology at the University of Oslo, Norway.
In relation to experiences of trauma, an aim is to undress the "dialog" between the sense of the self, the knowledge of the self, the informants’ coping strategies and their feeling of happiness and well-being.
Her scope is to reveal whether and how the category or term "trauma" is manifested in a cultural context and how the cultural context contributes to give meaning and color to the term for the individual and the collective. An aim is to reveal taboos in relation to trauma, and how shame and humiliation can be aspects of trauma that may contribute to a reassuring of the taboos.
Although Lene Lafosse’s project is funded by a social anthropological foundation, she moves towards psychology colored by phenomenology and gestalt theory.
Through the project she wants to concentrate efforts, focusing on three main academic and social concerns. Firstly she wants to contribute to the rising awareness on the implications of aspects related to trauma in our societies. Among others, one pillar for her project is the Norwegian Ministry’s focus on the economic and social costs of repercussions of trauma such as the circle of violence. Her second focus is to address collective and individual implications of trauma, and her project will have a direct address to instituions working with this and related themes. Her third concern is to show the cultural complexity that is experienced in today’s Norway, in regard to how we look at sickness and the subsequent healing process.
 
VIVIAN LUN
Vivian Lun is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
She has recently obtained the degree of M. Phil. in Psychology from the Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, with Michael Harris Bond as academic advisor. In her undergraduate and postgraduate years, she worked on projects concerning individuals' responses to interpersonal harm and interpersonal relationship harmony. She is also interested in cross-cultural research, because she believes they help understand and respect the similarities and differences among people from different cultural backgrounds.
 
SOWAN WONG (SOPHIA)
Sowan Wong is also a Member of the HumanDHS Research Team, and of the Global Coordinating Team.
She has recently obtained her Ph.D in psychology from Brunel University, West London, the U.K., under the supervision of Prof. Robin Goodwin. Her thesis was a cross-cultural study on work-family conflict and marital satisfaction. She received her M.Phil and Bachelor's degree in Psychology from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, with Prof. Michael Harris Bond as her academic supervisor. She is interested in looking at culture influences on the attitudes, values, and beliefs of individuals, which then influence individuals' behaviors.
She is currently involved in devising and delivering an intervention program which aims to enhance parents' parenting competencies, which can in turn lead to enhanced parent-child relationship. The program is being conducted in a local community in Hong Kong. The ultimate goal of the program is to promote family harmony, happiness, and health.
Selected publication:
Selected publication:
•  Measuring Emotionality across Cultures: Self-Reported Emotional Experiences as Conceptualizations of Self (retrievable also from http://self.uws.edu.au/Conferences/2002_CD_Wong_&_Bond.pdf), in Graven, Rhonda G., Marsh, Herbert W., and Simpson, Katrina B. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd International Biennial Conference. Self-Concept Research: Driving International Research Agendas (Sydney: SELF Research Center, University of Western Sydney, 2002).
• Wong, S., & Goodwin, R. (2007). Predicting marital satisfaction across cultures. In A. Chybicka, & M. Kazmierczak (Eds.), Appreciating diversity: Cultural and gender issues.(pp. 171-109). Kracow, Poland: Oficyna Wydawnicza "Impulse".
• 
Wong, S., Bond, M. H., & Rodriguez Mosquera, P. M. (2008). The influence of cultural value orientations on self-reported emotional expression across cultures. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 39, 224-229. (Impact Factor: 1.524).
• Wong, S., & Goodwin, R. (2009). The impact of work on marriage in three cultures: A qualitative study. Community, Work, and Family, 12, 213-232.
• 
Wong, S., & Goodwin, R. (in press). Exploring marital satisfaction across three cultures: A qualitative study. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. (Impact Factor: 0.870).
 

ANA LJUBAS
Ana Ljubas is currently working on her doctoral thesis at the Department of Psychology, University of Regensburg, Germany, examining the influence of culture on communication styles, intimacy and conflict resolution practices in intercultural couple relationships. She is looking at how mixed couples (German-French) have developed their communication patterns and established intimacy, taking into account their different cultural background and reflecting upon gender roles.
At the moment she is conducting interviews with mixed couples (being married vs. having been divorced) of different ages, one sample living in different regions of Germany, the other sample living in several French departments. Based on initial interviews a questionnaire will be designed which will be used for a comparative study also including non-mixed couples (living in France/Germany). According to those empirical findings that underline the cultural component of the expression of feelings and thoughts in the context of couple relationships, she is looking at how the investigated couples are managing their specific situation highlighting affective, behavioral and cognitive components of their experiences.
 
MIRIAM MARTON
Miriam H. Marton is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Miriam Marton, attorney and social worker, is the William R. Davis Clinical Teaching Fellow at the Asylum and Human Rights Clinic, University of Connecticut School of Law. Professor Marton teaches and supervises law students representing refugees seeking asylum and other legal relief in the United States. Professor Marton also conducts research on the particular issues facing female refugees fleeing gender-based violence, both in the countries-of-origins and in the United States' legal system. Professor Marton's research interests also include training lawyers to work with survivors of gender-based violence.
Please see:
• Relevance of Sexual Violence Against Female Noncombatant Victims of Destructive Conflict in the Study of Humiliation, paper presented at the 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, November 18-19, 2004.
• Terrorism and Humiliation, note presented at Round Table 1 of "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.
Humiliation in the Home: Survivors of Childhood Rape in the United States, note presented at Round Table 3 of "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.
• Humiliation and Asylum Seekers, abstract presented at the 2011 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 8-9, 2011.
 

ANNITA MILICEVIC
Anita Milicevic

 
ANA LJUBINKOVIC
Ana Ljubinkovic is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Ana Ljubinkovic, Ph.D., received her Ph.D. in Sociology in December 2008 at the University of Essex (UK), after attaining a Laurea in Sociology from the Università degli studi di Roma (Italy) and an M.A. degree in Theory and Practice of Human Rights from Essex (UK). Her doctoral thesis entitled The Victims of Humanitarian Intervention: a study of the psycho-social impact of the UNOSOM involvement in Somalia investigates long-term psychosocial effects of violence generated by military humanitarian interventions on the recipient population. Ana has four years of teaching experience in the Sociology Department, Centre for Psychoanalytic Studies and Human Rights Centre at the University of Essex, in the areas of sociology of human rights, refugee studies, and race, class and gender studies. She has worked as a researcher for CARE International in Kenya looking at the attitudes of Somali refugees in Dadaab Refugee Camps towards their future (2005) and, as a member of CTAR (Centre for Trauma, Asylum and Refugees), at the psychosocial needs of the Refugee population in Dadaab (2007 and 2008). She conducted a research for the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA) in Nairobi and prepared a report entitled Attitudes of the Somali People in Kenya Towards Potential Deployment of IGAD Forces in Their Home Country (2005). Ana is a Research Team member of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies since 2005.
Please see Milk and Urine: Intentional Humiliation as a part of Humanitarian Assistance, note presented at "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005. Please see also From Violent to Subtle Humiliation: Case of Somali Victims of UNOSOM Living in the Refugee Camps in Kenya, note presented at Round Table 1 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 15-16, 2005. See furthermore Is Hope the Last to Die? Research Study On The Situational Analysis In The Dadaab Refugee Camps, 2005, and Report on Field Research Conducted in Dadaab Refugee Camps (16.05.05 - 01.06.05), 2005.
 
tripathi
DEEPAK TRIPATHI
Deepak Tripathi is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Deepak Tripathi is a British historian and researcher whose interests include the Middle East and South Asia, great power rivalries and the United States in the contemporary world. He has a BA in politics, economics, sociology and English, a Post-Graduate Diploma in Business Administration and a PhD in social science. The title of his doctoral thesis was A Critical Study of the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars: Interests, Motives, Actions and the Makings of a Culture of Violence. He is the author of five books and more than a hundred and fifty articles. Tripathi’s books include a trilogy encompassing Imperial Designs: War, Humiliation and the Making of History (forthcoming 2013), Breeding Ground: Afghanistan and the Origins of Islamist Terrorism (2011) and Overcoming the Bush Legacy in Iraq and Afghanistan (2010). He has lectured in Britain and abroad and his articles have appeared in the Economist and the Daily Telegraph of London, as well as journals and periodicals around the world. Before turning to academic research, Tripathi had a long career as a journalist (1974-2000), primarily with the BBC, where he was a correspondent, editor and commentator. In the early 1990s, he set up the BBC bureau in Kabul and was the resident correspondent in Afghanistan. He has also reported from Syria, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and India. Tripathi is a member of the Political Studies Association and lives near London. 
Please see:
Imperialism & Humiliation, a video presentation for HumiliationStudies.org, where Deepak Tripathi explains the relationship between imperialism and humiliation. A PhD in social science, Tripathi belongs to the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Network of scholars and practitioners. The video was published on 20th October 2012 near London.
 


ZAHID SHAHAB AHMED
Zahid Shahab Ahmed is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Zahid Shahab Ahmed is Assistant Professor at the National University of Sciences & Technology (NUST) in Pakistan and the pioneer of the university's Department of Peace and Conflict. He also leads the South Asia Centre for Peace (SACP) and South Asia Peace Magazine (please contact sacp.pakistan [at] gmail.com for more information). He did his PhD in Peace Studies with a focus on regional peace and security in South Asia at the University of New England in Australia. From September 2009 he conducted fieldwork in Nepal, India, Bangladesh and Pakistan.
Zahid is a postgraduate from UPEACE in peace education. In July 2006, soon after finishing his course work in Costa Rica, he went to Sao Paulo, Brazil, to train young people from all over the world with his workshops on youth for peace entitled Youth Cooperation and Peace Education. While studying at the UPEACE, he also participated in the peace education curriculum development workshop (Canada), the UNESCO Chair on Human Rights conference (USA), and also spent a summer in the advanced study program on non-violent conflicts at the Fletcher School, Tufts University, USA.
Until recently, Zahid worked for the Friedrich-Ebert Stiftung (FES) Pakistan as a program officer in Conflict Transformation & Conflict Sensitive Management. Nowadays, many development actors are interested in doing peace and conflict assessment of their projects, and that is where Zahid fits in with his expertise.
Before finding his way towards UPEACE, he was working as a Program Officer for a Pakistani NGO (Sahil) against child sexual abuse. Furthermore, he has also worked for the Overseas Development Institute, London, as an independent researcher for a case study on the youth policy of Pakistan. He has also worked as a research consultant for the American Center for International Labor Solidarity (Pakistan) and the National Institute of Health (Pakistan). The Foundation for Universal Responsibility of His Holiness The Dalai Lama (WISCOMP), India, awarded him with a conflict transformation award-2005 to conduct a research in India and Pakistan on teachers' attitudes and practices towards Indo-Pak conflict.
Zahid has also been awarded with a Youth Service Award-2005 by a Pakistani Youth NGO (Jawan Pakistan) for his work on youth policy of Pakistan and child rights awareness. Zahid has conducted research on children's and women's rights. He has represented youth of Pakistan at the World Youth Peace Summit Asia-Pacific in 2004 in Bangkok, Thailand, at the Conflict Transformation Workshop in 2004 in New Delhi, India, and at the New Tactics in Human Rights-International Symposium in 2004 in Ankara, Turkey. Zahid has widely published on various issues, such as women's and children's rights, peace, diversity, coexistence, religion, and religious leaders. Zahid has done his Master's in Sociology from University of Agriculture Faisalabad (Pakistan) and graduated in Economics & Journalism from University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan. Zahid is committed to induce the positive spirits into the minds of people through education for peace and international understanding, which will lead to peace and stability on earth.
Please see:
•  Poverty, Family Stress & Parenting, March 2005, as well as his paper on the Situation of Human Rights in Bangladesh, 2005. See also Zahid's Report from Auroville (March 2005) and Poverty, Globalization, Social Customs & South Asian Children in Prostitution (April 2005).
•  Extremism in Pakistan and India: The case of the Jamaat-e-Islami and Shiv Sena, co-authored with Rajeshwari Balasubramanian, Colombo, Sri Lanka: Regional Centre for Strategic Studies.
Peace and Conflict Impact Assessment (PCIA): Lessons from Pakistan, Peace and Conflict Review, vol. 5, no. 2, 2011, pp. 12-27 [refereed Journal article]
A review of the book entitled “Asia’s New Regionalism” by Ellen L. Frost, published in the Journal of South Asian Development.
Terrorism and Pakistan’s security dilemma, web article.

 
ZINTHIYA GANESHPANCHAN
Zinthiya Ganeshpanchan is a doctoral research student at
Loughborough's Midlands Centre for Criminology and Criminal Justice, focusing her doctoral dissertation upon "Women and Conflict  a case study of Sri Lanka." Her special interest is Gender and Violence. Zinthiya is currently working for Homeless International, an International Development Agency working on  Urban Poverty.  Before joining Homelss Internatioanl she worked for the Newcastle City Council Regional & European Programmes Team and  was a  voluntary worker for the North East Refugee Services.
Zinthiya's aim is
• to study women and conflict in relation to Sri Lanka, exploring ethnic nationalism's historical and cultural forms and meanings;
• to map the forms and impact of women's involvement in conflict and violence;
• to analyse the political, social and cultural impact of women's involvement in conflict/war, specifically in relation to identity formation and political involvement;
• to explore to what extent women have accommodated, participated and/or resisted relations with national movements and with the state, their families and militarism;
• to develop a analysis on women in ethnic national conflicts re-thinking the issue of difference' with specific focus on re-representation, identity and political involvement;
• a related objective is to explore and analyse issues of gender specific harms in conflict, and the extent to which such harms have been recognised in the determination of refugee status and intended to fill in the gap in the current literature on women and conflict with specific focus upon Sri Lanka.
Zinthiya is kindly building on our parents union idea and developing it further, please see
Parents and Equal Dignity.
Please see Domestic and Gender based Violence among Refugees and Internally Displaced Women (2005). See also New Parenting, a text presented at Parents and Equal Dignity, Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.
 

JOSEPH A. AGARD
Joseph A. Agard is a Mediator/Arbitrator and Guardian Ad Litem in New York City. He studied EU and US Law, dispute resolution and international affairs in Europe and the United States. He holds a Masters Degree in law (UK), also advanced qualifications in international arbitration, transnational civil litigation, intercultural negotiation/ mediation law and practice and international affairs. A former Guyana Scholar, European Fellow, senior public servant also police detective Joseph was an 'A' student at New York University. He has lived, worked and studied in the UK, USA, France, Germany, Belgium Luxembourg and Holland and received training and exposure at the European Court of Justice, European Court of First Instance, European Court of Auditors, The European Parliament, European Commission, European Council, The European Reconstruction Bank; The French Parliament and French Supreme Court; the United Nations in New York; also with several humanitarian organizations. Among other professional associations Joseph is a member of the American Society of International Law. He is affiliated with the United Nations Association of USA, the City University of New York International Center (CUNY), the Medicare Rights Center as a Medicaid/Medicare Counselor also with several other NGOs. In 2004 he was awarded the Volunteer Service Award by CUNY Graduate Center also the Certificate of Appreciation by the Medicare Rights Center for outstanding voluntary service. Joseph studied at the Faculty of Law Graduate School, University of Leicester, UK; University of Paris II, Paris Institute of European Legal Studies, France; University of Humboldt Faculty of Law, Germany; Tulane University School of Law, USA and New York University, Center for International Affairs, USA.
 

helfert
ERIN HELFERT
Erin Helfert holds a deeply personal and professional interest in the theory and concepts of Human Dignity and Humiliation, and its numerous applications to human rights, peace and reconciliation, state building, and women's empowerment. This interest has been fostered through her work in women-led economic growth programs, and gender-based violence (GBV) issues; as well as her personal experiences in the area of GBV in North Africa.
Erin Helfert has an MA in International Trade and Development from the Université Paris XI, and an MA in International Relations from the American Graduate School of International Relations. She currently resides in New York City. Erin has several years' experience in the areas of gender, human rights, economic growth, and sustainability. She has worked on a variety of donor funded and private sector projects; including those with the US Agency for International Development (USAID), the Union of Foreign Chambers of French Commerce and Industry (UCCIFE). She has lived and worked in countries throughout Africa, Central America, and the European Union. Erin recently partnered with a fashion industry veteran to form the Nairobi-based production company, Panâh, whose mission is to provide a link between designers and skilled artisans in the Great Lakes region of Africa, while engaging local actors to build capacity and expand their personal business opportunities. She is also an active member of the global group, Maiden Nation, whose mission is to empower women through ethical fashion.
 

JOSÉ CALVO GONZÁLEZ
José Calvo González (n. Sevilla 1956) est Licencié en Droit (spécialité Droit Privé) pour l´Université de Sevilla (1978). Docteur en Droit (1984). Professeur de Théorie du Droit et Philosophie du Droit (Faculté de Droit. Université de Málaga. Espagne) (1986). Magistrat Suplente de la Cour d´Appellation Civile et Pénale de Málaga (Tribunal Superior de Justicia de Andalucia. Audiencia Provincial de Málaga) (1996). Membre de la Association Française des Historiens des Idées Politiques (Université d'Aix-en-Provence. France), de l' Equipe Internationale de Philosophie pénale (Institut de Criminologie. Université de Paris II. Panthéon-Assas), du Instituto Jurídico Interdisciplinario de la Faculdade de Directo (Universidade do Porto. Portugal). Professeur du Curso de Postgrado y Maestría para el Mejoramiento en el Desempeño del Ejercicio de la Función Jurisdiccional dans le Proyecto de Reforma Judicial y Mejoramiento del Sistema de Justicia (Facultad de Ciencias Jurídicas de la Universidad Centroamericana (UCA). Managua. Nicaragua), Professeur de la Maestría en Derecho Procesal y Penal de la Facultad de Ciencias Jurídicas de la Universidad Centroamericana (UCA. Managua. Nicaragua).
Livres:
•  Derecho y Narración. Materiales para una teoría y Crítica narrativista del derecho, Barcelona, Editorial Ariel, 1996, XVII+141 pp.
- La Justicia como relato. Ensayo de una semionarrativa sobre los jueces, Málaga, Editorial Agora, 1996, 210 pp. 2ª ed., 2002, 228 pp.
•  El Cante por Derecho. Las "Carceleras" y el krausofloclorismo andaluz. (Un estudio de Etnología jurídica y Filosofía Penal), con ilustraciones de Eugenio Chicano, Málaga, Ayuntamiento de Málaga, Área de Cultura, 2003, 127 pp.
Articles:
•  "Ghettoización de la Universalidad y futuro de los Derechos Humanos", en Pluralismo, Tolerancia y Derechos, Actas de las XV Jornadas de Filosofía Jurídica y Social, Derechos y Libertades, Revista del Instituto Bartolomé de Las Casas, (Universidad Carlos III. Madrid ), Año II, Julio-Diciembre, 1995, núm. 5, pp. 405-412.
•  Veuillez voir, sur les Droits Humaines, Liberté-Securité et Paix, La fragilidad de los Derechos, Revista de Derecho. Universidad Centroamericana. Facultad de Ciencias Jurídicas (Managua. Nicaragua), n m. 9/ 2005, pp. 203-218, et aussi Revista Brasileira de Direito Constitucional, núm. 8 (Ética y Constituiçao), Jul/Dez 2006 (en presse).
•  Veuillez voir aussi Harmonías jurídicas. Algunas notas (musicales) sobre Derecho y Justicia, en Mundo Jurídico 15/10/2005 (Brasil), pp. 1-8 (http://www.mundojuridico.adv.br/sis-artigos/artigos.asp?codigo=705).

 

SEEMA SHEKHAWAT
Seema Shekhawat holds a doctoral degree from the University of Jammu, J&K on the topic “Impact of Conflict Situation, Militancy and Displacement on Women: A Study of Jammu Region.” She has written a book titled “Conflict and Displacement in Jammu and Kashmir: The Gender Dimension.”
She works together with Debidatta Aurobinda Mahapatra, who holds a doctoral degree from the Jawaharlal Nehru Uni-versity, New Delhi on the topic “Russia and the Kashmir Issue Since 1991: Perception, Attitude and Policy.” He has written a book titled “India-Russia Partnership: Kashmir, Chechnya and Issues of Convergence.”
Currently, both are doing research on the Kashmir across the line of control. They are also editors of quarterly newsletter Across LoC. Both are affiliated to the Centre for Strategic and Regional Studies, University of Jammu.
Please see:
Conflict and Displacement in Jammu and Kashmir: The Gender Dimension, Jammu, India: Saksham Books International, 2006.
Conflict in Kashmir: The Gender Dimension, abstract presented at the Second International Conference on Multicultural Discourses, 13-15th April 2007, Institute of Discourse and Cultural Studies, & Department of Applied Psychology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, as part of the 9th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.
Shekhawat, Seema & Mahapatra, Debidatta Aurobinda (2006), Kargil Displaced of Akhnoor in Jammu and Kashmir - Enduring Ordeal and Bleak Future: A Report on the Border Displacement and Return in Akhnoor.
Mahapatra, Debidatta Aurobinda and Shekhawat, Seema (2007), Conflict in Kashmir and Chechnya: Political and Humanitarian Dimensions. Delhi, India: Lancer's Books.
Women in Security, Conflict Management and Peace, in The Icfai Journal of Governance and Public Policy, Vol. 2, No. 4, pp. 43-56, December 2007.
Mahapatra, Debidatta Aurobinda and Shekhawat, Seema (2008), Viewing Kashmir Conflict through the Prism of Dignity and Humiliation, abstract presented at the 2008 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 11-12, 2008.
Mahapatra, Debidatta Aurobinda and Seema Shekhawat (2008), The Peace Process and Prospects for Economic Reconstruction in Kashmir, in Peace and Conflict Review, Vol. 3, No. 1, Fall 2008, pp. 1-17.
Conflict Induced Displacement: The Pandits of Kashmir, Conflict Trends, Issue 4, 2009., pp. 31-37.
 

DEBIDATTA AUROBINDA MAHAPATRA
Debidatta Aurobinda Mahapatra works with the Centre for Central Eurasian Studies at the University of Mumbai in India. He holds a doctoral degree from the Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi on the topic “Russia and the Kashmir Issue Since 1991: Perception, Attitude and Policy.” He has written a book titled “India-Russia Partnership: Kashmir, Chechnya and Issues of Convergence.”
He works together with Seema Shekhawat, who holds doctoral degree from the University of Jammu, J&K on the topic “Impact of Conflict Situation, Militancy and Displacement on Women: A Study of Jammu Region.” She has written a book titled “Conflict and Displacement in Jammu and Kashmir: The Gender Dimension.”
Currently, both are doing research on the Kashmir across the line of control. They are also editors of quarterly newsletter Across LoC. Both are affiliated to the Centre for Strategic and Regional Studies, University of Jammu.
Please see:
•  India-Russia Partnership: Kashmir, Chechnya and Issues of Convergence, New Delhi, New Century, 2006.
•  Plight of Divided Families in Jammu and Kashmir, abstract presented at the Second International Conference on Multicultural Discourses, 13-15th April 2007, Institute of Discourse and Cultural Studies, & Department of Applied Psychology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, as part of the 9th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.
Shekhawat, Seema & Mahapatra, Debidatta Aurobinda (2006), Kargil Displaced of Akhnoor in Jammu and Kashmir - Enduring Ordeal and Bleak Future: A Report on the Border Displacement and Return in Akhnoor.
Mahapatra, Debidatta Aurobinda and Shekhawat, Seema (2007), Conflict in Kashmir and Chechnya: Political and Humanitarian Dimensions. Delhi, India: Lancer's Books.
A Perspective on Peace in Kashmir, in The Icfai Journal of Governance and Public Policy, Vol. 2, No. 4, pp. 31-42, December 2007.
Mahapatra, Debidatta Aurobinda and Shekhawat, Seema (2008), Viewing Kashmir Conflict through the Prism of Dignity and Humiliation, abstract presented at the 2008 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 11-12, 2008.
Mahapatra, Debidatta Aurobinda and Seema Shekhawat (2008),The Peace Process and Prospects for Economic Reconstruction in Kashmir, in Peace and Conflict Review, Vol. 3, No. 1, Fall 2008, pp. 1-17.
The Pearls and String of the Theory, 2009
BRIC Seeking Fresh Answers to Old Problems, 2009 .
A blog on Aurobina's visit to City Hall in Belfast to see the celebrations of St Patrick's day, 2010.
Mapping Transitional Justice in Kashmir: Drivers, Initiatives, and Challenges, Research Paper 3, Oxford Transitional Justice Research Working Paper Series, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, University of Oxford, UK, pp. 1-19.
A Case of Humiliation in Indian Politics, Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 2011.
Mani Bhavan and Gandhi, re-published from Transcend Media Service, www.transcend.org.
Mumbai’s Woes and their Implications, 2011.
Positioning the People in the Contested Borders of Kashmir, Working Paper 21, Centre for International Border Studies Research, Queen’s University, Belfast, UK, pp. 1-17.
"Taliban's New Strategy," in Strategic Culture Foundation (Moscow) online magazine, 7th September 2011.
"Migration, Extremism and Terrorism," in Strategic Culture Foundation (Moscow) online magazine, 21st September 2011.
"Sufism Asserting Against Extremism," in Transcend Media Service Weekly, November 2, 2011.
• "Whither Alliance of Civilizations?," in Transcend Media Service Weekly, December 19-25, 2011.
Restoring Dignity of Borderlanders in Conflict Zones by Promoting Cooperation, abstract presented at the 2012 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 6-7, 2012.
 

LONE ALICE JOHANSEN
Lone Alice Johansen is currently working on her master thesis on African conflict resolution traditions (ubuntu) effect on perceived humiliation. She wants to investigate how the humiliation that is connected to being part of an ethnic/cultural group in conflict can be reduced by using ubuntu. To explore Ubuntu's effect on perceived humiliation she is going to do an empirical study at a dialogue/conflict resolution seminar in Norway. Here students from Sudan, Great Lakes Region and Ethiopia/ Eritrea will participate as representatives for their conflict areas. She wants to use a method combining questionnaire, participant observation and semi-structured interviews.
The semi-structured interviews will be conducted before and after the dialogue seminar. The interviews (pre and post the seminar) and the participant observation will focus only on one of the three groups who are going to take part in the ISFiT Dialogue seminar, and at the post seminar interview it may be possible to conduct a group interview. As opposed to the qualitative approach to the study, all of the three groups will receive a questionnaire before and after the seminar (see project description).
She has tried to reformulate the "human inventory index" into an index for humiliation experienced as a group member. She searches for other ways of measuring humiliation that are more connected with conflict and experienced humiliation because of ones group belonging and asks whether there is a way to measure humiliation that is more related to how people experience humiliation in conflict.
Please see here her project African Solutions to African Intergroup Conflicts:
Ubuntu and Humiliation, A Study of Ubuntu and Its Effect on Perceived Humiliation in an Interactive Track Two Dialogue Seminar
.
 

PAMELA M. CREED
Pamela M Creed earned a doctorate from the Institute of Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University in Arlington, Virginia. Her dissertation, titled Myth, Memory and Militarism: The Evolution of an American War Narrative, explored narrative connections between macro and micro levels. In particular, it examined the relationship of culture, emotion and agency in the dramatic construction, mobilization and acceptance of an American war narrative and later of individual counter narratives. The study takes the events of 9.11 as a traumatic trigger and then demonstrates that the storylines in the 9.11/Iraq War narrative patterns were anchored more in American mythological constructs, public memories and militarism than content about terrorism or Iraq. In the second phase of her research she analyzed micro-narratives from veterans of the Iraq War by exploring how they understood the presented storylines. She attempted to discern the strength of the cultural influence inherent in the narrative patterns. Her research focused on locating shifts in attitudes or perceptions, which may have resulted in the repositioning of self or discourse. Throughout the study she examined the role of emotions, particularly anger, pride (honor), shame and humiliation. Drawing on work done by Lindner and Hartling, Pamela located indicators of four types of humiliation in the 9.11/Iraq War narrative patterns that occur repeatedly until the March 2003 invasion. She then analyzed those patterns in the context of a humiliation cycle and conflict escalation. Pamela has also done research with Joseph Montville on the relationship between the North and South in the United States. She studied the historical Northern narrative of insult and disdain toward the South in an attempt to enhance understanding of the historical alienation between the white North and the white South. This relationship has been marked by cultural, religious, and intellectual tensions, which have created an identity-based split where resentments against Northern insult and exploitation, once strictly centered in the South, are now dispersed throughout the United States in the so-called 'red' states. Pamela presented this work with Joseph Montville in April 2005 at the Esalen Institute Center for Theory and Research. She also presented this study at University of Massachusetts, Boston in November 2005 at the "New Generation of Ideas" conference. Pamela holds a M.Ed. from the University of Maryland and a BA in History from the American University in Washington, DC. In the summer of 2006 she studied local educational policy for disadvantaged populations under a Fulbright Scholarship in South Africa. She currently resides in Belgrade.
Please see here:
• The Dominant American Narrative between 9/11/01 and the Invasion of Iraq, an introduction to a potential dissertation, presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 14-15, 2006. The dissertation aims to analyze the dominant American narrative between 9/11/01 and the invasion of Iraq through positioning theory and the literature on humiliation and conflict.
• An American Conflict of Mind: Competing Narratives of National Identity and Values, 2007.
 

milosevic
TIJANA MILOSEVIC
Tijana Milosevic is a Belgrade-based freelance writer. Before returning to Serbia, Tijana received an MA degree from the School of Media and Public Affairs at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and worked with various public diplomacy and international communications organizations in Washington. She lectured in media psychology and media research at Singidunum University for Media and Communications in Belgrade. Tijana was trained with the Radio Free Europe in Washington and BBC World in London. She is also the recipient of the Goldman Sachs Global Leaders Award and numerous Open Society Institute scholarships. Tijana is reachable at: tijana.milosevic[@]gmail.com.
 

ZUZANA LUCKAY MIHALCINOVA
Zuzana Luckay Mihalcinova is also a member of our Global Coordinating Team and project leader of the World Literature for Equal Dignity intervention project.
She received her Ph.D. degree at the P.J. Šafárik University (UPJS) in Košice, Slovakia, in June 2012. In her thesis she addresses the complex concept of dignity by an inter-disciplinary approach within the framework of human rights, normative and descriptive frames, and arts. She is a literature scholar with an MA in English Linguistics and Literature from the University of Pécs, Hungary (PTE). She spent several years in South-Africa doing research at Pretoria University (UP), completing her M.A. on Reconciliation and Forms of Disgrace in J.M. Coetzee's Post-Apartheid Novel, preparing for her Ph.D. in a pre-doctoral year. She is committed to the study of the diverse forms of dignity, as well as the correlation between dignity (dignity as a descriptive concept as a quality) and human dignity (human dignity as an abstract concept). Zsuzsa was born in Czechoslovakia. She grew up in a region that underwent great political and social changes. She has travelled extensively. She is married to Gabriel Mihalcin and they live in Košice, Slovakia.
Past conferences and publications:
• Regaining Dignity in Europe, abstract for presentation at the Re-inventing Eastern Europe conference, organized by the Euroacademia in Prague, Czech Republic, in November 15-16, 2013.
• Pécs, Hungary, University of Pécs, ‘HUSSE9’ international conference of Hungarian Society for the Study of English (HUSSE), presentation on ‘The Concept of Dignity,’ January 2009
• 'The Concept or Regaining Dignity and the Manifestations of this Process in Post-apartheid South- African Literature,' abstract for presentation at the African Studies Association of UK (ASAUK) conference The Presence of the Past. Africa in the 21st Century held at University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom, in September 2008.
• 'Regaining Dignity: Social and Cultural Dimension of Sustainable Development in Europe,' a presentation at the PhD - FES conference in Bratislava, June 2008, published in “New” Europe and Challenges of Sustainable Development, Friedrich Ebert Stiftung.
• Representations of Violence in Contemporary South African Fiction, presentation for 'Violence and the Contexts of Hostility,' global inter-disciplinary conference to be held in Budapest, Hungary in May 2008.
• Doing ‘Good’, Maintaining Dignity: the effects of apartheid on ethical choices studied via contemporary South African fiction, abstract of a presentation at ‘Culture, Language And Literature Across Border Regions’ International Conference At Pavol Jozef Šafárik University In Košice, Slovakia , April 2008.
• The Role of Literature in Human Rights: Studying The Art of the Novel Through the Texts of Milan Kundera, J.M. Coetzee and Ernesto Sabato, presentation in the 'Worlds, Texts, Critics' Conference in Durban, South Africa, July 2007.
• Violence, Crime and Fear in Contemporary South-African Literature, presentation at the Violence, Hostility and the Construction of Enemies Conference, 2nd May - 5th May 2007, Budapest, Hungary; please see here the e-book version
• Representations of violence in contemporary South African fiction, in Guggisberg, Marika, and Weir, David (Eds.), Understanding Violence: Contexts and Portrayals, Freeland, Oxfordshire: Inter-Disciplinary.Net.
• Restoring Social Order in Post-Apartheid South Africa: The Role of Public Confession and Private Repentance in the Administration of Transitional Justice, abstract of a presentation at the Global Political and Social Order Conference, Prague, Czech Republic, 2006.

 

saab

GABRIELA SAAB
Gabriela Rodrigues Saab Rivo is also a Member of the HumanDHS Education Team.
Gaby is a Postgraduating Law Student from the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. She graduated from University of Sao Paulo with a Bachelor's Degree in Law. She has completed the Sciences Po International Program in Paris, where she studied sustainable development policies. At the university she published her thesis on "The Treatment of Child Soldier in International Law." Currently her research focuses on water rights (water as a human right).
Please see:
• The Recruitment of Child Soldiers: Humiliation Compromising Childhood
Abstract presented at the 2009 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 10-11, 2009.
• The Treatment of Child Soldiers under International Law, Paper presented at the 2009 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 10-11, 2009, based on O Tratamento da Criança-Soldado no Direito Internacional (The Solder-Child in International Law), Tese De Láurea, Faculdade de Direito da Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Direito Internacional.
• Gabriela Saab: Creating International Law for Dignity (Português/Inglês, English/Portuguese)
Português: Este vídeo é bilíngüe (Português/Inglês). Foi criado na São Paulo no dia 4 de junho de 2012. Gabriela Saab compartilha suas opiniões sobre a dignidade e suas contribuições para a iniciativa da Universidade Mundial para Dignidade com Evelin Lindner.
English: This video is bilingual (Portuguese/English). It was created in São Paulo on the 4th June 2012. Gabriela Saab shares her views on dignity and her contributions to the World Dignity University initiative with Evelin Lindner. See also some still pictures from 4th June 2012. See, furthermore, the work by Judge Antônio Augusto Cançado Trindade, see, for example, his chapter "Humankind as a Subject of International Law" in his book International Law for Humankind: Towards a New Jus Gentium (2010).
Gabriela Saab Apresenta a Universidade Mundial para Dignidade / Gabriela Saab Presents the World Dignity University (Português/Portuguese)
Este vídeo foi criado na CHDEP, Jardim Ângela, São Paulo no dia 1 de junho de 2012. Ury fez a gravação.
English: This video was created in CHDEP initiative in Jardim Ângela, São Paulo on 1st June 2012. Ury did the recording.See also some still pictures.
 

METTE LEBECH
Mette Lebech lectures in philosophy at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth since 1998. She has lectured and published widely on the idea of Human Dignity, on bioethics and on the philosophy of Edith Stein. In 2006 she defended her thesis The Identification of Human Dignity. Hermeneutic, Eidetic and Constitutional Analyses in the Light of the Phenomenology of Edith Stein in Leuven, Belgium. She is currently the President of the Irish Philosophical Society and the General Editor of its Yearbook.
Please see here is most recent book publication:
On the Problem of Human Dignity: A Hermeneutical and Phenomenological Investigation,Würzburg: Könighausen und Neumann., 2009.
 

rukooko

ARCHANGEL BYARUHANGA RUKOOKO ("RUKOOKO")
A. Rukooko Byaruhanga is currently an associate professor of philosophy specializing in human rights and applied ethics at the Department of Philosophy, School of Liberal and Performing Arts, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda. He started lecturing at Makerere University in 1989 after completion of a master’s degree in philosophy at the University of Nairobi. He is also Dean of the School of Liberal and Performing Arts, having served previously as deputy dean (from 2004 to 2009) and Dean, Faculty of Arts (from 2009 to 2011). Besides, from 2006 to 2010, I was serving as a general manager of Makerere Center for Applied Ethics, a professional ethics organization operating in East Africa.
His research and lecturing interests have been dual: one strand of human rights focusing on philosophy and human rights, the right to food, African traditional philosophy; the second, in the area of applied ethics, focusing on leadership ethics and integrity, development ethics, business ethics, professional ethics and African ethics. This is also largely supplemented by routine administrative work including examination of students, both at undergraduate and graduate levels.
In regard to the mandate of Makerere Centre for Applied Ethics, he was involved in consultancy work to train both private and public organizations including the Uganda Directorate of Ethics and Integrity in developing their codes of ethics for government departments (August 2006). Since 2009, as team leader, he facilitated different districts and organizations to develop their codes of ethics.  In December 2006, he trained young leaders across Africa in ethics and integrity in leadership, which was funded by Freedom House, USA. From 2007-2008, he developed a Training Manual of Ethics and Good Governance for the Directorate of Ethics, Office of the President, Uganda. From 2007-2008 (under MACAE), he was contracted by the World Bank in collaboration with Creative Associates International (CAI) and the Association for Professional Societies in East Africa (APSEA Kenya) to write modules for training nurses in Ethics and Integrity and their continuous professional development; see http://www.macae.or.ug. From 2007-2008, he was involved in the Integrity training programs carried out in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, and Mali under the Aga Khan Foundation network which also extended to Armenia.
From 2001-2004, he led and conducted Human Rights training sessions for district and other leaders at Makerere University. From 2001 to 2006, he led MACOMBA link, an organisation that brings together four institutions (Makerere University, Mbarara University, University of Bradford, and Advocates Coalition for Development and Environment) to develop university curriculums in Uganda.     

 

elnahry
OMAR EL-NAHRY
Omar El-Nahry is graduating from University College London with a BA in European Social and Political Studies in September 2013 and plans to pursue a Master's degree in International Relations and Political Science. His research interests include armed conflict, arms control and identity formation and development in subnational groups.
Forged on the Battlefield: The Influence of Armed Conflict on the Consolidation of Saharawi Identity, Undergradute Dissertation at the Department of European Social and Political Studies, University College London.
 
hammer
TONYA R. HAMMER
Tonya R. Hammer is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, and the Global Coordinating Team.
Dr. Tonya R. Hammer is an Assistant Professor of Counseling at Oklahoma State University-Tulsa. In 2008, she received her PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision from St. Mary's University in San Antonio, Texas, with an emphasis on Relational Cultural Theory and Social Justice. Her master's degree is in Psychology and Counseling from the University of Mary-Hardin Baylor. Dr. Hammer is actively involved in her professional organizations including serving on the board for the Association for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Issues in Counseling, a division of the American Counseling Association. Dr. Hammer's research includes the areas of humiliation and language particularly with regard to marginalized populations, relational cultural theory, and the area of professional identity and competence in the counseling field. Dr. Hammer has written on issues impacting women both as clients and as professionals. Her research and areas of interest with regard to women include controlling images in film as they pertain to women's career choices and mentoring of female faculty in counseling education. Her work as a professor and a counselor is directed by relational cultural theory (RCT). In that regard she has worked with Alexander Street Press and Microskills Training to produce a training video on RCT. Her clinical work has included work with children and adolescents ranging from pre-K through high school. While she worked with both boys and girls, a majority of her emphasis was on working with adolescent girls dealing with relational aggression and body image. Since that time she has also done private practice as a contract therapist working with men and women in areas of depression and anxiety as well as relational issues.
In 2008, Tonya finished her doctoral dissertation entitled: Myths, Stereotypes, and Controlling Images in Film: A Feminist Content Analysis of Hollywood's Portrayal of Women's Career Choices, at the Counselor Education and Supervision department at St. Mary's University, San Antonio, Texas (the dissertation can be ordered through ProQuest). She summarizes her disseration as follows: "Myths, stereotypes and controlling images are imbedded in cinema. Women can be disempowered and marginalized by these images and it is important to explore the images found in this medium and the potential they have to affect women’s career choices. The content analysis of 81 films revealed themes including but not limited to the idea that relationships should be secondary to careers in women’s lives; women are secondary to men in the workplace; women in power are depicted in isolation; women are portrayed in traditional careers more than non-traditional careers; regardless of career choice women are often depicted in a negative light and women of ethnicities other than White are not adequately represented in mainstream media, in any area, much less with regard to career choices. Through film women are learning that they are secondary to men in one more area of society and that, in essence, there is nothing wrong with this perception."
Prior to entering the counseling field Tonya was a paralegal for fourteen years. She worked as a case manager with Communities in School, San Antonio, a non-profit organization whose mission is to help students stay in school and prepare for life. Communities in Schools' main focus is working with students who have been determined by the state to be "at-risk," a classification in itself that can be humiliating regardless of the conditions that led to the labeling.
Tonya's research areas also include incorporation of relational cultural theory into career counseling, the use of film in counseling, and the issues of humiliation and shame surrounding malpractice claims against therapists and clinical supervisors.
Tonya writes: "My goal or vision statement for my professional career is to teach on the college level. Specifically, I would like to teach on the graduate level in the field of counselor education. I am inspired and challenged by the dialogue that is entered into in the classroom when you have a passionate educator. I want to be that passionate educator and be able to share my passion for RCT and for social justice advocacy, including the work of the humiliation studies network. I see this being done not only in the classroom but through the written word as well.... Personally and professionally I want to use every opportunity to further an understanding of Relational Cultural Theory and Social Justice. I see both as being vehicles through which we can interrupt or end the cycles of humiliation that occur in our everyday lives both on a personal and a global level."
Please see:
•  The Global Impact of Humiliation on Relationships and World Peace, presentation proposal together with Dana Comstock to the Third International Women's Peace Conference, Dallas, Texas U.S.A., July 10-15, 2007.
•  The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Myths, Stereotypes, and Controlling Images in Film, abstract presented at the 2008 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 11-12, 2008.
•  together with Selma Yznaga, Shunned by Difference: The Intersection of Humiliation and Discrimination, abstract presented at the 2010 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 9-10, 2010.
 

SALMAN TÜRKEN
Salman Türken is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, and the HumanDHS Education Team.
Defining himself as a cosmopolitan, Salman is interested in studies of all levels of analysis that influence and change both individuals and societies in this globalisation era. Influenced by critical social psychology, ideology - understood as common sense, as legitimising and reproducing unequal power relations which might also lead to humiliation in intergroup relations - is now the main research topic for him.
Salman holds a MA degree in psychology from the University of Oslo, where he for the time being holds a position as a lecturer in social psychology. In his MA thesis (2006), Salman developed a brief cross-culturally stable scale that measures global identity, arguing that more and more people around the globe transcend national and territorial boundaries, identify first and foremost with their shared humanity (rather than seeking parochial ends), and show responsibility for and "engage the distant other."

 

CHANDER SHEKHAR
Chander Shekhar, Ph.D., hails from a Dalit family (Jatavs) of a village in northern Indian. He is currently Associate Professor at the Department of Mathematical Demography and Statistics, International Institute for Population Sciences (Deemed University) Mumbai. He has been involved in various research projects in Population Studies and Public Health funded by the national and the international agencies. Presently, he is coordinator of a nationwide District Level Household and Facility Survey under the Reproductive and Child Health (RCH-DLHFS) funded by the World Bank. He is also one of the two principal investigators of the study entitled “Elderly Abuse in North Indian Families”. He has conducted various capacity building programmes in South Asia. He has been associated with the research studies commissioned by the Planning Commission of India, the National Commission on Population, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Govt. of India and UNDP.
 
jogdand
YASHPAL JOGDAND
Yashpal Jogdand is doing his MPhil/PhD in social psychology at the Zakir Husain Centre for Educational Studies, School of Social Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. His research focuses on Dalit Humiliation and resistance in Maharashtra. He is attempting to look at caste and untouchability from a social psychological perspective. Social identity, intergroup emotion, particularly humiliation, is his interest area.
Yashpal explains: "I owe my intellectual and moral roots to Dalit movement of Maharashtra, especially the work of Mahatma Phule and Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar. After completing my BA and MA in Psychology from Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad, I passed the competitive entrance of Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. I also got selected for the Rajiv Gandhi National Fellowship (RGNF). During my undergraduate years I was deeply involved with the dalit literary movement as well as the anti-caste movement at Aurangabad. At JNU, I am a part of the Satyashodhak Study Circle and United Dalit Students Forum. We organize dalit students to resist against caste prejudice, humiliation, and exclusion."
 

SILJE RIVELSRUD
Silje Rivelsrud (Norway) is a master student at Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Oslo. She has a BA in social science, with psychology as main subject, from the University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, Norway.
Please see:
The Sahrawi Refugees and Their National Identity: A Qualitative Study of How the Sahrawi Refugees Present Their National Identity in Online Blogs, Silje Rivelsrud Master's Thesis in Peace and Conflict Studies, The Department of Political Science, The Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Oslo, May 2010.
 


JENNIFER KIRBY
Jennifer Kirby is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Coordinating Team, of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, and of the HumanDHS Education Team.
She graduated from Appalachian State University with a Bachelor's Degree in Biology. At the university she published her senior thesis on "The Nature of Holocaust Survivor Poetry: The Power of Poetic Expression." She is currently the Administrative Assistant/Event Coordinator for Appalachian State University's Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and Peace Studies. As she continues her academic interests, Jennifer plans to pursue graduate education in genocide and peace studies while incorporating her interest in humiliation studies within her field of study.
In her free time Jennifer loves reading, traveling, and spending time with animals of all kinds.
 

SARWAR ALAM
Sarwar Alam, Ph.D., has been a postdoctoral fellow in the department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies at Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia since 2007. Sarwar Alam received his doctorate in Public Policy from the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, in 2006. He previously obtained baccalaureate and postbaccalaureate degrees in Political Science from the University of Chittagong, Bangladesh. He also obtained an MA in Human Resource Development from Pittsburg State University, Kansas. Before moving to the United States, he served in the Civil Service of Bangladesh. He worked in the Ministries of Primary and Mass education, Women & Children Affairs, and Textiles & Jute. He also worked as a magistrate in some rural districts of Bangladesh.
Please see:
•  The Genesis of Islamic Extremism in Bangladesh, paper presented at the 2008 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 11-12, 2008.
 

ARDIAN ADŽANELA
Ardian Adžanela (originally Axhanela) is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Coordinating Team.
Ardian has a M.A. in State Management and Humanitarian Affairs (University of Sarajevo, La Sapienza University of Rome, and the University of Belgrade), and a B.A. in Applied Ethics and Historical Studies (Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia). His future plans include a wide scope of involvement (personal research, training, academic research and eventually a Ph.D.) in areas pertaining to the quality of social interaction in transitional countries like Bosnia and Herzegovina, and its effects on individuals and the society as a whole.
Please see:
Human Dignity and Humiliation in the Context of Post-War Society of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Presentation given at the 15th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies "Peace at Home, Peace in the World," in Istanbul, Turkey, 28th - 30th April 2010.
Corruption as a Violation of Human Rights in South East Europe: The Case of Bosnia and Herzegovina, presentation at the International Summer School Sarajevo, Alumni Conference "Transitional Justice and Democracy Transition: Looking Back at the Past for Gaining a Perspective on the Future," 29-30 July 2011, by the Pravnik Association, in cooperation with the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung-Rule of Law Program South East Europe. published in the International Journal of Rule of Law, Transitional Justice and Human Rights, Year 2, Volume 2 by the "Pravnik," Association from Sarajevo, as a part of the International Summer School Sarajevo (ISSS) 2011 (http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2001920).
Petty Corruption And Human Rights Implications: The Case of Bosnia And Herzegovina, a revised version of the essay published in the International Journal of Rule of Law, Transitional Justice and Human Rights, Year 2, Volume 2 by the "Pravnik" Association from Sarajevo, as a part of the International Summer School Sarajevo (ISSS) 2011 (available at papers.ssrn.com, to view the essays please click on the "One-click Doawnload."
 

collazzoni
ALBERTO COLLAZZONI
Alberto Collazzoni is a clinical psychologist and PhD student at the University of L'Aquila in Italy. His PhD project is focused on the study of the association between humiliation (considered as a social stress index), past familial negative events and psychopathology.
He is born in Ascoli Piceno (AP), Italy, in 1985.
Alberto attended Classic School as secondary school and he decided to attend Psychology at the University of L'Aquila in 2004. He finished his Master Course in Clinical and Dynamic Psychology on 2010.
He started to work as educator in a family house for children under judicial protection since 2010 until 2011.
In 2011, he won a PhD student position at the Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences (DISCAB), at the University of L'Aquila.
See:
Collazzoni, Alberto, Cristina Capanna, Massimiliano Bustini, Paolo Stratta, Marzia Ragusa, Antonio Marino, and Alessandro Rossi (2014). Humiliation and Interpersonal Sensitivity in Depression. In Journal of Affective Disorders, 167 (2014), pp. 224-27, doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2014.06.008.
 
 
RALPH LENTZ
Ralph introduces himself as follows: I am a native of the mountains of northwestern North Carolina and my family's roots in the region date back to the 1700s. Much of my academic work has been concerned with trying to discover what it means to be an "Appalachian". I am also a Christian, and more recently, I have become more interested in what it means to be a true human being - and to live in true community with other human beings. Hence my latest research has to do with exploring the connections between empire ("power") and theology ("religion") and how Christian theology can provide an alternative - another Way - for human community that is not based on an ontology of violence, but on what I like to call the "Ontology of the Word."  This "ontology of the Word" is really the ontology of the Christian God's LOVE for the world and for humanity. Historical Christianity, of course, has unfortunately often collaborated with the two gods of modern world history (i.e. after 3,500 B.C.E.) - empire and force. Yet, there have also been throughout the centuries Christians who lived out their faith in the face of these terrible forces to make the world better - people like Mother Teresa, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, and Martin Luther King Jr. - and these are the people whom I am interested in researching.
 
engler
ANNETTE A. ENGLER
Annette Anderson-Engler, Ph.D., is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, the HumanDHS Education Team, our HumanDHS Research Team, and our Global Coordinating Team.
Annette earned her doctorate in 2008 at Saybrook Graduate School in San Francisco, California. Her research focused on secondary trauma and displaced identity in daughters of U.S. Vietnam War veterans. She specialized in using narrative analysis as a method of inquiry by examining how daughters of war-traumatized veterans use narratives to construct social and personal meaning to their lived experiences. Annette was awarded her Masters degree in Conflict Analysis and Resolution at Nova Southeastern University and received her BSW in social work from the University of North Texas. She is currently a member of Association of Conflict Resolution and ISPP-International Society of Political Psychology. Annette took part in Dan Bar-On's Storytelling and Dialogue work through the Körber Stiftung foundation in Hamburg, Germany (2006-2008). Her dissertation is dedicated to the work and memory of Dan Bar-On (1938-2008).
Annette will finish her second masters degree from Walla Walla University, in March of 2011, where she has been working on her MSW in advanced clinical social work. During her training, she has focused on counseling women suffering from grief, trauma and loss.
Please see:
• the notes that Annette presented at our workshops in NY: Humiliation and Displaced Identity (2004), and Displaced Identity and Humiliation in Children of Vietnam Veterans (2005).
Constructing and Reconstructing Narratives – A Passageway to Personal Meaning and Social Change, abstract presented at the 2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 13-14, 2007.
Shared Narratives: The “Voice” of Personal and Social Identity – Are we Listening?, abstract presented at the 2009 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 10-11, 2009.
Humiliation Through Silent Grief in Women: When Words Are Not Enough, abstract presented at the 2010 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 9-10, 2010.

See also Annette Engler's contributions to the World Dignity University (WDU) initiative. These video clips were recorded on October 28, 2011, in Portland, Oregon, by Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner for the World Dignity University (WDU) initiative.
• 01 Annette Engler: Intoduction, Annette Engler is being interviewed by Evelin Lindner. The recording is done by Linda Hartling.
• 02 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Grief, Annette Engler is being interviewed by Evelin Lindner. The recording is done by Linda Hartling.
• 03 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for the Transmission of Transgenerational Trauma, Annette Engler is being interviewed by Evelin Lindner. The recording is done by Linda Hartling.
• 04 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Cultural Diversity, Annette Engler is being interviewed by Linda Hartling. The recording is done by Evelin Lindner. (Please note that Annette Engler uses the term "servitude" in the sense of "service.")
• 05 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Conflict Resolution, Annette Engler is being interviewed by Linda Hartling. The recording is done by Evelin Lindner.
• 06 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Poetry, Annette Engler's presentation is being recorded by Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner.
 

gaskew

TONY GASKEW
Tony Gaskew, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Coordinator of Criminal Forensic Studies at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford. He is a Fulbright-Hays Fellow, an FDD Terrorism Fellow, and a University of Pittsburgh Faculty Diversity Fellow. He is member of the Consortium for Educational Resources on Islamic Studies (CERIS) and has conducted ethnographic fieldwork in Egypt and Israel examining the Muslim Brotherhood, structural, and political violence. He is the author of the book Policing Muslim American Communities (2008, New York: Edwin Mellen Press), and has published articles in distinguished journals such as Practicing Anthropology and Contemporary Justice Review.
See, for example:
The Role of Humiliation and Dignity for Structural, and Political Violence, abstract presented at the 2009 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 10-11, 2009.
“Are You With the F.B.I.? Fieldwork Challenges in a Post-9/11 Muslim American Community,” in Practicing Anthropology, 31 (2), 2009, pp. 12-17.
“Peacemaking Criminology: An Ethnographic Study of Muslim Americans, the USA PATRIOT Act, and the War on Terror,” in Contemporary Justice Review, 12 (3), 2009, pp. 345-366.
Released: Searching for Dignity and Respect Through Prison Re-entry Initiatives, abstract presented at the 2010 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 9-10, 2010.
Rethinking Prison Reentry: Transforming Humiliation into Humility, abstract shared at the 2014 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 4-5, 2014.

 

amollo
CAROLINE AMOLLO
Caroline Anne Amollo is also a Member in our HumanDHS Global Education Team.
She is a believer in Social Justice, and has obtained a Master’s degree in Conflict Resolution at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, with a goal of acquiring knowledge and skills needed to become a part of global change through globalization and egalization by influencing policies that impact developing country communities in order to eradicate poverty and enhance human development without disrupting human dignity. In her home country, Kenya, she has been directly involved with environmental issues that impact human security namely, climate change and resource scarcity, also working against human rights violations like female genital mutilation among other gender issues in the developing world. She has experienced first-hand how these correlate to impact human security locally and globally. She looks forward to commence her doctoral studies in the fall of 2013. For her social justice and volunteerism efforts among the Maasai community in Kenya she was rewarded with the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program through which she has been able to pursue graduate study in the USA.
Please see:
Caroline Amollo: Introduction to Research on Dignity, a video in which Caroline greets the participants of the 10th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict that takes place at Columbia University in New York City on 5-6th December 2013, among them her academic adviser Inga Bostad. Carol is the first PhD candidate of the World Dignity University initiative, in partnership with the University of Oslo, Norway. This video was recorded on 2nd December 2013 in Nairobi, Kenya, by Nicole Dorie.
 
fynn

VERONICA FYNN
Veronica Fynn holds a BSc (hons) in Zoology/Biochemistry from the University of Ghana, a BA in Psychology from the University of British Columbia, a Master in Public Health from the University of Nottingham, a Masters in Law from Osgoode Hall Law School and is currently doing her PhD in Law at Osgoode Hall, Toronto, Canada. Her research interest centers on vulnerable populations (e.g., women and children in armed conflicts) with emphasis on health, education, law, research and development. She is the Executive Director/Co-Founder of EV Research Inc and the Editor-in-Chief of the newly developed Journal of Internal Displacement.

 

musoni
YVES M. MUSONI
Yves Musoni, both an artist and an independent researcher, is a Congolese Tutsi. He was born in 1971 in Goma, a small city situated far East in the Congo, North of Lake Kivu, at the border with Rwanda. He was about 7 years old when his father was transferred to work in Kolwezi (Katanga), another city in the south of the Congo, for 16 years. Kolwezi is important to Yves's history because its cultural diversity shaped his adolescence. His artistic mother also had a major influence on him. Some of his best childhood memories are of a popular decorative art in Rwanda called Imigongo that his mother applied to whisky and wine bottles.
Musoni is a survivor of the little-known genocide of Tutsis in the Congo. In 1996, Musoni and almost all the members of his community were forced to leave the Congo. Musoni spent 13 years in Rwanda before immigrating to the USA as the winner of the US Diversity Visa Program. Musoni graduated from the National University of Rwanda with a degree in political science. He is currently learning mixed media painting, exploring abstract art at Vanderbilt's Sarratt Art Studios, and volunteering his time to help the Lost Boys Foundation and the Frist Visual Center for the Arts.
Musoni's dream is to return to school to complete his education. He strongly believes that it is important to build a bridge between science, art, and spirituality. Only this way can we gain a complete understanding of reality.
Yves writes to the HumanDHS Research Team: "In my culture, there is a proverb which says a bird cannot know where the sorghum is ready to harvest it unless it flies. Since I read Irene T. Sanders's interesting book entitled Strategic Thinking and The New Science: Planning in the Midst of Chaos, Complexity, And Change (New York:, The Free Press, 1998), I have come to think of researchers and academicians as modern-day explorers in our terra incognita. I agree with the author that not one of us has ever lived in the kind of world we live in today, and none of us have ever been to the future, so like every explorer, each of us, in our own way, has something to share with others.
Far from my country, I wish to immerse myself in new experiences, knowledge, and skills to better understand our human family.
The strengths I will develop building my capacity will have a strong impact on my community principally. In my country, policymakers work in a complex and difficult environment without sufficient access to reliable information. Often, they cannot respond adequately to the many challenges related to systematic and widespread violation of human rights.
My ambition is to be involved actively in the HumanDHS Research Team, to contribute as well as to learn. I will bring with me my experience as an independent researcher, artist, and victim of human rights violations that are not well known or documented since my culture suffers from a culture of silence, the fear of repercussions, and a lack of written documentation.
I am eager to learn new approaches and new perspectives from my fellow global citizens.
Someone said, 'Organizations exist only for one purpose: to help people reach greater ends together than they could achieve individually', I truly need the help of the HumanDHS to improve my capacity to dignify our world and transcend humiliation."
Please see also his research proposal Transitional Justice and Statelessness in the Congo: The Case of the Banyarwanda Congolese Tutsi.
 

balosa
DAVID BALOSA
David Balosa is also a Member of the HumanDHS Education Team.
David wrote (on 30th September 2013:) I am an Angolan-American Scholar whose research interests include language domination, Spanish in the US, Political discourse analysis, sociolinguistics, interculturality, critical intercultural communication theories, and postcolonial theories. I am a retired High School teacher of French and Spanish from the School district of Philadelphia since 2013. I am now an Adjunct Professor of English and Foreign Languages at Delaware State University (DSU), Dover, DE, where I teach Swahili, French, Portuguese and Spanish, 2013 - present. I taught Functional Grammar Discourse and Language and Culture for Classroom Teachers, at Pennsylvania State University, Abington in 2010-2011. I taught English for International Students and Adult Basic Literacy at LaSalle University from 2002-2010 I taught Elementary and Intermediate French at Community College of Philadelphia (CCP) from 206-2010 I am a poet.
David added on 5th October 2013: Many observers of the role of scholarship in the age of globalization may agree that scholarship has also been affected by capitalistic mentality. It would take a human dignifying research perspective to overcome the challenge and address the need of bringing back research to its primary mission - providing information to humankind for well informed global intercultural citizenship for dignity, generosity, unity, and common humanity.
Please see here:
Global Intercultural Citizenship for Dignity: Philo-politico-Educational Perspectives
Abstract presented at the 2013 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5-6, 2013. See also his Powerpoint presentation, and see his sharing of the fable of The Rat and Toad (Morale: Humiliation creates crisis).
The Politics of Language in the U.S. - Humiliation for Language Minority Speakers, paper contributed to the 2014 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 4-5, 2014.
Global Intercultural Citizenship (GIC) in Rwandan Reconstructive Dialogue, co-authored with Seif Sekalala, paper contributed to the 2014 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 4-5, 2014.
 

sekalala
SEIF SEKALALA
Seif Sekalala is also a Member of the HumanDHS Education Team.
Seif shared with us his background on 11th November 2014: "I was born in Uganda, East Africa, and came to the United States to pursue higher education (among other reasons) after high school in 2004; I have family spread out over 3 continents, and I love interacting with people from all over the globe. Given that background, perhaps it is no accident that I ended up studying what I study. I draw the inspiration for my research from some of the experiences my family and I have had in Africa and the West, and my overarching ambition is to understand and to fight some of the root causes of global injustice and inequality.
As of 2012 to 2016, the biggest project I am working on is my dissertation, in which I examine the narratives of Rwandan former refugees and genocide survivors (“FRGS”), and their expressions of coherence and resilience.
I am honored and delighted to be part of the HumanDHS fellowship of scholars, activists, and humanists. May peace and human dignity prevail in our world.
The goals of the researcher must be to empathize with the subject, to enter the subject’s realm of experience, and to attempt to understand the value of the person as an individual. ― Littlejohn, 1992 Pg. 171 (On Blumer’s 1969 Writings)"
   

rashed

DOAA RASHED
Doaa Rashed is also a Member of the HumanDHS Education Team.
Doaa Rashed is a doctoral candidate in the Language, Literacy & Culture PhD program at THE University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). Originally from Egypt, Doaa started her career as a teacher of English as a foreign language in 1996. She currently teaches English as a Second Language, Second Language Acquisition & Culturally Responsive Teaching at UMBC. She also serves as a delegate in the Women in Public Service Leadership Project (WPSP) and president of Maryland TESOL; a teacher professional organization. Her research looks into teachers' professional identity and the factors that influence their sense of professionalism, focusing on cultural and ethnic diversity among teachers of English as a second language. She is currently developing a course on the discourse of humiliation as it ignites conflict across cultures.

 

fonkem

FONKEM ACHANKENG
Fonkem Achankeng is also Member of the HumanDHS Education Team.
Fonkem Achankeng, PhD, a Hubert Humphrey International Fellow, is Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. Dr. Fonkem served as senior official in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Cameroon for 12 years, and was also founder and executive director of the Association for Nonviolence, where he helped to introduce and moderate a third voice in Cameroon in the 1990s in the wake of a very polarized introduction of multiparty politics. Following an interdisciplinary approach, he has published more than 18 titles and presented his research in various regional, national, and international conferences. His research interests encompass peace and conflict studies; postcolonial nationalism and conflict; nonviolence; identity, culture and conflict; human and people’s rights; refugees, migration and human services; the working poor; aging; international mediation; crisis intervention in human services; and families with children with disabilities.

 
ramloll
RAMESH RAMLOLL
Please find Ramish Ramloll's background here.
Please meet also Jaishree Beedasy, the wife of Ramesh Ramloll.
 

ishii
TOMOKO ISHII
Tomoko Ishii is also a member of our HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Tomoko Ishii, Ph.D., is the CEO of the Human Wellness Institute (HWI) which is Voluntary Non-profit Organization (VNPO). The institute is a new research and education center promoting human wellness, especially mindfulness for victims of violence. Earlier, Tomoko worked at the Department of Stress Disorders Resarch at the Tokyo Institute of Psychiatry. She is a member of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, where she has presented her work in domestic violence several times at the ISTSS conferences. [read more]
 

ghoshroy

SUBRATA GHOSHROY
Subrata Ghoshroy is a Research Associate in the Science, Technology, and Society Program at the Massachu­setts Institute of Technology, USA. His current research interests are global security with particular reference to South Asia, nuclear weapons proliferation, and disarmament. Previously he was a Senior Defense Analyst with the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) and served in the U.S. Congress as a professional staff member and as a Science Fellow. Subrata was also a Senior Fellow at the John F. Kennedy School at Harvard University. He was the first and the only person in the 90-year history of GAO to blow the whistle on his discovery of fraud in a major military program. He was trained as an electrical engineer and spent two decades in defense research and development. He holds Master’s degrees in electrical engineering and in public policy. Most recently, he co-edited South Asia at a Crossroads, published by Nomos, Baden Baden, Germany in May 2010. Subrata was born in India and maintains close contact with his family and friends there although he has lived in the U.S. for the last forty years.

 

sander
CAROL SANDER
Carol Sander, MSW, PhD(c) is a lecturer and researcher at the University of Toronto in Toronto, Canada. She is currently involved in doctoral research and advanced training in trauma healing of genocide survivors. She is an NGO representative to the Economic and Social Council at the United Nations.
 

gellman
MNEESHA GELLMAN
Mneesha Gellman completed her PhD in Political Science at Northwestern University in December 2013. Her dissertation looked at how ethnic minority communities use memories of violence in mobilizations for cultural rights, particularly the right to mother tongue education, in Mexico, Turkey, and El Salvador. She currently lives in Freetown, Sierra Leone, where she is researching education policy. She is interested in how marginalized citizens advocate for their rights during periods of democratization, and how cultural myths and stories find their way into classrooms where they contribute to citizen formation. Mneesha completed her MA in Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Queensland, Australia, with support from a Rotary World Peace Fellowship, and she did her BA at Bard College in New York. Mneesha's articles on international peacebuilding can be found in journals such as Conflict Resolution Quarterly, Asian Perspective, and Development in Practice.
 
KALEN YOUNG
Kalen Young has a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and is working on her MA in Social Justice and Human Rights from Arizona State University. Kalen has extensive research and professional experience working on interdisciplinary research projects pertaining to sexual orientation, gender identity, public policy and hyper-masculine environments. Her research interests include radical pedagogies in praxis, humiliation as it intersects with trauma, and obstetric/traumatic fistulas through a human rights lens Her research grants her the opportunity to explore the complex matrices of socio-political impulses that perpetuate systems of institutionalized discrimination and violence. Her current research focuses on obstetric and traumatic fistulas as a nexus where trauma and humiliation intersect.
 

lira

WELLINGTON M. LIRA
Wellington Marinho de Lira is natural of Recife, Pernambuco State located in the Northeast of Brazil. Wellington has a master’s degree in applied linguistics and teaches as a Professor at the Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE) since 2009. In 2012 he was a visiting professor at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC, USA. During his stay, he learned about language prejudices between the North and the South of the USA, and could compare it with the same situation between Northeast / Southeast in Brazil. Back to Brazil he met the Professor Evelin Lindner and was introduced to the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Group. Since then he has started a new approach in his research, giving lectures in Brazil and outside the country. In 2012 he presented the plan of his new research at the International Conference of HumanDignity and Humiliation Studies Group at the University of Oslo, gave a lecture at the University of Santiago and at UMCE, both in Chile. In 2013 he gave also a lecture about the same theme at Magnitogorsk State University in Russia. His current research is titled: Language Education for Promoting Dignity and Helping Overcome Humiliation: Principles and Practices for Language Teachers.

 



List of Academic Advisors

 

LINDA M. HARTLING
Linda M. Hartling, Ph.D., is the HumanDHS Director, and also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, and the HumanDHS Education Team. She is furthermore the Editor of the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (JHDHS).
Linda is the Associate Director of the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) at the Stone Center, which is part of the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College in Massachusetts.
Dr. Hartling is a member of the JBMTI theory-building group advancing the practice of the Relational-Cultural Theory, a model of psychological growth and development. She coordinates and contributes to training programs, publications, and special projects for the JBMTI. She holds a doctoral degree in clinical/community psychology and has published papers on resilience, substance abuse prevention, shame and humiliation, relational practice in the workplace, and Relational-Cultural Theory. Dr. Hartling is co-editor of The Complexity of Connection: Writings from the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute at the Stone Center (2004) and author of the Humiliation Inventory, a scale to assess the internal experience of derision and degradation. She is currently a member of an international team establishing the first Center for Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.
Please see
• Humiliation: Assessing the Impact of Derision, Degradation, and Debasement by Linda M. Hartling, and Tracy Luchetta, first published in 1999 in The Journal of Primary Prevention, 19(4): 259-278.
• An Appreciative Frame: Beginning a Dialogue on Human Dignity and Humiliation, introductory text prepared by Linda M. Hartling for "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.
• Humiliation and Assistance: Telling the Truth About Power, Telling a New Story, paper prepared by Linda M. Hartling for "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.
• Humiliation: Real Pain, A Pathway to Violence, preliminary draft of a paper presented at Round Table 2 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 15-16, 2005.
• Relationship Tips developed by Judith Jordan, and Linda Hartling, at the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute, 2006.
• From Humiliation to Appreciation: Walking Toward Our Talk, abstract presented at the Second International Conference on Multicultural Discourses, 13-15th April 2007, Institute of Discourse and Cultural Studies, & Department of Applied Psychology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, as part of the 9th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.
• Bykr, A. S. and B. Schneider (2002). Trust in Schools: A Core Resource for Improvement. New York, Russell Sage Foundation. Please see the notes that Linda made on this book.
• From Humiliation to Appreciation: Walking Toward Our Talk, presentation at the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College, Wellesley, Massachusetts, USA, in 2007.
   
MOIRA R. ROGERS
Moira R. Rogers, Ph.D., is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and part of the core HumanDHS Research Management Team.
Moira is Associate Professor of Spanish at Eastern Mennonite University and Intercultural Consultant for a variety of organizations in Germany, Spain, and the U.S. She has a Ph.D. in Science and Technology Studies from Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, an MA in Biblical Studies from the Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminaries, Elkhart, IN, and a Teaching Degree in Philosophy from the Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Born in Argentina, Professor Rogers grew up in a multicultural and multilingual home in Buenos Aires and brings her personal and professional experiences as well as her Anabaptist faith commitments to bear on her teaching and research work. As faculty, she teaches Spanish, intercultural communication, and courses on Migrations/ Inmigration that integrate Global, National, and local issues. Her doctoral research focused on the elitism and mechanisms of exclusion of academic cultures in early eighteenth-century Germany, published as Newtonianism for the Ladies and Other Uneducated Souls: The Popularization of Science in Leipzig (2003). More recently, she has done training at the Summer Institute for Intercultural Communication in Portland, Oregon. She received an international award for her study entitled "Internationales Baucamp: Bausteine für ein gelingendes Zusammenleben im 21. Jahrhundert" (2005).
Moira currently leads a program at the University of Cadiz, Spain, and works with its newly established "Instituto de Inmigración e Interculturalidad." Her current research project is entitled "Humiliation and Human Strength: Stories of African-Spanish Migrations," a study that tells a chapter of the story of mass migrations in the 21st century with a focus on the Spanish enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla in northern Morocco. Through this study she hopes to contribute to breaking the cycles of humiliation fueled by the displacement of many and to making our world a hospitable place for all people.
   

MAGGIE O'NEILL
Maggie O'Neill is also a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, the HumanDHs Global Core Team, and part of the core HumanDHS Research Management Team. Maggie is particularly an Academic Advisor to our upcoming Refugees and Humiliation Project. She is furthermore a Member of the Academic Board of the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (JHDHS).
Maggie is based in Criminology and Social Policy at Loughborough University. Prior to this she worked for eleven years in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at Staffordshire University and before that was ten years in the Department of Sociology at Nottingham Trent University. She co-edited Sociology (with Tony Spybey): the journal of the British Sociological Association from 1999-2002; she is a member of various professional associations including the National Network of Sex Work Projects and the British Sociological Association and British Criminology Association. She acts as a research consultant on community cohesion issues and has had commissions from the Home Office, and regional Local Authorities. Maggie researches the issue of prostitution, women's experiences, routes in to prostitution, and communities affected (since 1990) and forced migration (since 1998).
An expert in participatory action research (working with people, groups, communities to create change) Maggie has a reputation for developing innovative culture work to imagine new ways of understanding and articulating the experiences of crime and victimization, that breach disciplinary boundaries and expand and enliven the methodological horizons of cultural criminology. Her theoretical concept of ethno-mimesis (the inter-connection of sensitive ethnographic work and visual re-presentations) is a methodological tool as well as a process for exploring lived experience, displacement, exile, belonging and humiliation.
Research funding has been received from the AHRB; Joseph Rowntree Foundation; Home Office; Leicester Local Authority and Local Education Authority, East Midland Arts, Nottingham Trent and Staffordshire Universities. Books include:
Adorno, Culture and Feminism (Sage);
Prostitution and Feminism: Towards a Politics of Feeling (Polity);
Prostitution: A Reader (Ashgate) with Roger Matthews;
Gender and the Public Sector (Routledge) with Jim Barry and Mike Dent;
Sex Work Now (Willen) with Rosie Campbell.
See also:
Humiliation, Social Justice and Ethno-mimesis, note presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, 6th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in New York, December 15-16, 2005;
together with Ramaswami Harindranath, Theorising Narratives of Exile and Belonging: The Importance of Biography and Ethno-mimesis in “Understanding” Asylum, in Qualitative Sociology Review, II (1, April 2006), pp. 39-52.
Forced Migration, Humiliation and Human Dignity: Re-Imagining the Asylum-Migration Nexus through Participatory Action Research (PAR), abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 14-15, 2006.
Re-Imagining Diaspora through Ethno-Mimesis: Humiliation, Human Dignity and Belonging (2007). In: Reimagining Diasporas: Transnational Lives and the Media, edited by Olga Guedes-Bailey (Liverpool John-Moores University), Myria Georgiou (University of Leeds), and Ramaswami Harindranath (University of Melbourne). Published by Palgrave Publishers, UK.
Humiliation and Human Dignity: Conducting Participatory Action Research with Women Who Sell Sex(see www.safetysoapbox.co.uk), abstract presented at the 2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 13-14, 2007.

"Making Connections: Ethno-mimesis, Migration and Diaspora," in Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society, 14, 289-302, September 2009, doi:10.1057/pcs.2009.5.
Humiliation, Social Justice and Recognitive Communities: Thinking about the Asylum-Migration-Community Nexus in the Context of HDHS, abstract presented at the 2012 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 6-7, 2012.

   


REINHARD WOLF
Reinhard Wolf is a professor of international relations at the Department of Political Science at Goethe University, Frankfurt/M.  His current research focuses on the relevance of respect and disrespect in international relations, notably on the expression of, sensitivity to and consequences of disrespect among states and nations.  He is especially interested in applying insights and findings from both philosophy and social psychology to theoretical and empirical studies in international relations.
Please see:
Respect and International Relations: State Motives, Social Mechanisms and Hypotheses, paper presented at the 49th Annual Convention of the International Studies Association, San Francisco, March 26-29, 2008.
Respect and International Relations: State Motives, Social Mechanisms and Hypotheses
Abstract presented at the 13th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies "World Peace through Humiliation-Free Global Human Interactions," in Honolulu, Hawaii, August 20 to 23, 2009.
   
PATRICIA RODRIGUEZ MOSQUERA
Patricia Rodriguez Mosquera is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and she is part of the core HumanDHS Research Management Team.
Patricia is currently Assistant Professor at the School of Social Sciences and Law, Brunel University, UK. Patricia studied psychology at the Autónoma University of Madrid (Spain) and the University of Amsterdam (UvA, The Netherlands). She obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Amsterdam in 1999. Her Ph.D. involved a series of cross-cultural studies on the role of honor in emotion. She was awarded a post-doctoral research grant from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) to continue her work on honor cultures. She worked as a post-doctoral researcher and as Assistant Professor at the Department of Social Psychology, University of Amsterdam. She is currently Assistant Professor at the School of Social Sciences and Law, Brunel University, UK. Her research focuses on the interplay between culture and emotion. She does research on a variety of emotions: pride, shame, anger, envy, and happiness. She has studied emotions in a variety of cultures and geographical regions: Southern Europe, Northern Europe, North-Africa, Middle-East, the Caribbean islands, U.S.A. Her work on humiliation focuses on the role of this emotion in insult-related conflict. She is especially interested in the situational, cognitive, and behavioral correlates of humiliation.
Please see:
Humiliation and Honor, note presented at Round Table 1 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 15-16, 2005.
Humiliation and Racism, paper presented at The National Conference on Racism in Global Context, 9th-11th November 2007, Murdoch University, Australia.
Rodriguez Mosquera, P.M., together with Agneta H. Fischer, Antony S. R. Manstead, and Ruud Zaalberg (2007)
Attack, Disapproval, or Withdrawal? The Role of Honor in Anger and Shame Responses to Being Insulted, Cognition and Emotion, in press.
   
EVELIN G. LINDNER
Evelin Gerda Lindner is a cross-cultural social psychologist and physician and she is part of the HumanDHS Research Management Team.
Evelin is the founder of HumanDHS. She holds two Ph.D.s, one in medicine and one in psychology. In 1996, she designed a research project on the concept of humiliation and its role in genocide and war. German history served as starting point.
   

PAUL A. STOKES
Paul A. Stokes is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. He is part of the core HumanDHS Research Management Team.
Paul A. Stokes is a College Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at the National University of Ireland, Dublin, since 1996 and a member of the Faculty of Human Sciences in UCD. During the academic year 2000-2001 he was a Visiting Scholar at the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB). Dr. Stokes also acts as Consultant to Edelman Ireland PR in the area of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). He is furthermore a Fellow of the Cybernetics Society of Great Britain and a member of the Metaphorm on the Cybernetics of Governance based at the University of Sunderland. He is also a Board Member of the Collegium Humanun based in Zurich. For a number of years, Paul Stokes (together with colleagues - sociologists, psychoanalysts and group analytic therapists), has been investigating relations between Catholics and Protestants in Ireland with a view to deepening our understanding of the sources of the conflict in Northern Ireland. The particular focus was the state of social bonds between these groups and the role of shame and humiliation in this conflict.

   

ALICIA CABEZUDO
Alicia Cabezudo is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and part of the core HumanDHS Research Management Team.
Alicia is a Professor and Peace / Human Rights Educator and Consultant. Until recently, she was the Director of Educating Cities Latin America (International Relations Bureau, Municipality of Rosario, Argentina). The issue of humiliation is of deep concern to her because of the sufferings in the Latin-American region through dictatorship and torture. Her goal is to work on humiliation by trying to build a strong democratic consciousness – after the traumatic experiences of the region – from the individual and social point of view, and how to strengthen both individuals and societies in this direction. Her work as Director of Educating Cities – a strong international association developing educative programmes in cities – has given her the chance to work in Latin American Town Halls in order to approach this goal.

   

BARBARA HARRELL-BOND
Barbara Harrell-Bond is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Barbara is a Distinguished Visiting Professor in Forced Migration and Refugee Studies at the American University in Cairo, Egypt.
   
ARIE NADLER
Arie Nadler is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
He was born in Munich in 1947. He is Professor of Social Psychology at the Tel-Aviv University. From 1984 to 1988 he served as the Head of the Department of Psychology and, from 1993 to 1998, as the Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences at Tel Aviv University. He was the Head of the Academic Committee of the Tami Steinmetz Center for Peace Research at Tel Aviv University since its foundation in 1992 until 2002. He has also founded, and was the first Head, of the Institute for Diplomacy and Regional Cooperation at Tel Aviv University (1999-2002), which was established jointly by the Peres Centre for Peace and Tel Aviv University.
Since 2000, Professor Arie Nadler holds the Argentina Chair for Research on Social Psychology of Conflict and Cooperation (donated by the Argentinean Friends of Tel Aviv University). He has written extensively in scholarly international journals of social psychology. His major areas of scientific interest focus on cooperation between individuals and groups, inter-group relations and social conflict, social identity and prejudice, as well as massive social traumas and their impact on individuals and collectives.
Please find here some of his publications:
•   From Tel Aviv to Ulcinj - Can we learn from each other about reconciliation and peace-building? by Arie Nadler in Eurozine (2001-07-04).
•  Inter-Group Helping Relations As Power Relations: Maintaining or Challenging Social Dominance Between Groups Through Helping, in Journal of Social Issues(58, 3, March, pp. 487-502, 2002).
•  Arie Nadler (2004), together with Tamar Saguy, Reconciliation Between Nations: Overcoming Emotional Deterrents to Ending Conflicts Between Groups, in Langholtz, Harvey and Stout, Chris E. (Eds.), The Psychology of Diplomacy (New York, NY: Praeger, 2004). Arie comments this chapter as follows: The empirical paper which Tamar wrote is reported (in part) in the chapter. It is an analysis of the pitfalls in reciprocal assistance in "joint Israeli-Palestinian projects". It basically asked the question: Which projects survived and continued despite the tensions of the Intifada, and which folded? It does say a lot about equality in giving and receiving assistance (the hallmark of true cooperation). Unfortunately, it was published in an Israeli journal (in Hebrew). But the chapter may still be relevant.
•  Going beyond guilt and revenge: The effects of admitting responsibility and expressing empathy for the enemy's suffering on inter-group reconciliation, note presented at the 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, November 18-19, 2004.
•  Intergroup Helping as Status Relations: Effects of Status Stability, Identification, and Type of Help on Receptivity to High-Status Group’s Help, in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 91 (1), pp. 97–110, together with Samer Halabi, 2006.
•  Arie explains (April 14, 2007): I am attaching (1) an empirical paper ( with Liviatan) on the effects of apology on reconciliation, and (2) a chapter (with my student and co-worker Nurit Shnabel)  that is forthcoming in a book which I co-edit and summarizes some ideas on the process of reconciliation between groups, and the Need Based Model of reconciliation. I think that the model is very relevant to our work on humiliation and conflict: 
(1)   Intergroup Reconciliation: Effects of Adversary’s Expressions of Empathy, Responsibility, and Recipients’ Trust, in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 32 (4, April), pp. 459-470, together with Ido Liviatan, 2006.
(1)  Instrumental and Socio-Emotional Paths to Intergroup Reconciliation and the Need-Based Model of Socio-Emotional Reconciliation, to appear in: A. Nadler, T. Malloy & J.D. Fisher (eds.) Social Psychology of Intergroup Reconciliation. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, together with Nurit Shnabel, 2006.
•  Arie explains (April 14, 2007):You already have my JPSP paper with Halabi (Intergroup Helping as Status relations). I am attaching a chapter which is less technical and much more relevant to the issue of Humiliation and Assistance and the importance of attending to this link in social-programs on the inter and intra national levels:
(1)  Inter-Group Helping as Status Organizing Processes: Implications for Inter-Group Misunderstandings, in press in: Demoulin, S., Leyens, J.P. & Dovidio, J.F. (Eds.): Intergroup Misunderstandings: Impact of Divergent Social Realities. Washington, DC: Psychology Press, April 2007, revised version, together with Samer Halabi, and Gal Harpaz-Gorodeisky.
• Arie Nadler, together with Thomas Malloy, and Jeffrey D. Fisher (Eds.) (2008). Social Psychology of Inter-Group Reconciliation: From Violent Conflict to Peaceful Co-Existence. Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press.
   
PETER T. COLEMAN
Peter T. Coleman is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
He is the Director of ICCCR and Assistant Professor of Psychology and Education. He holds a Ph.D. and M.Phil. in Social / Organizational Psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University and a B.A. in Communications from the University of Iowa. He has conducted research on social entitivity processes (ingroup/outgroup formation), gender discrimination in organizations, the mediation of inter-ethnic conflict, ripeness in intractable conflict, conflict resolution & difference, and on the conditions which foster the constructive use of social power.
   
MICHAEL HARRIS BOND
Michael Harris Bond is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. He is Professor of Psychology and teaches at the Department of Psychology of the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research interests are social perception, the social psychology of language use, impression management, values, cross- cultural social psychology, and cross-cultural interaction.
Professor Bond has written numerous articles, book chapters and books on these topics, see, for example, Social Psychology Across Cultures: Analysis and Perspectives (1993, 1994, 1998, 1999, together with Peter B. Smith), or The Handbook of Chinese Psychology that Bond edited in 1996, or "Individual perceptions of organizational cultures: A Methodological Treatise on Levels of Analysis" co-authored with Geert H. Hofstede in Organization Studies (1993).
   
PIERRE DASEN
Pierre Dasen, Professor of Anthropology of Education and Cross-Cultural Psychology at the Faculty of Psychology and Education of the University of Geneva, Switzerland.
   
JUAN ALVAREZ VITA
Professor Juan Alvarez Vita (Peru) is Ambassador of Peru and Professor of Public International Law. He is a Member of the Scientific Council of the Summer University on Human Rights, Geneva. He was President of the National Commission for Refugees and of the Special Commission for Cuban Refugees. He has collaborated as expert in Human Rights issues with the United Nations and with the Inter-American Court Human Rights. He is a former Vice President of the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights of the United Nations. He participated in the elaboration of the United Nations Convention against torture, the United Nations Convention on the rights of the child as well as the Declaration on the right to development. He is author of "Diccionario de Peruanismos", "El Derecho al Desarrollo", (published in Spanish and Italian by the Inter.-American Institute of Human Rights and the University of Padua), "Tratados Internacionales y Ley Interna" and "El Derecho a la Salud como Derecho de la Persona Humana" (translated by the United Nations to English, French and Russian).
   

FINN TSCHUDI
Finn Tschudi is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
Finn Tschudi has spent most of his professional life - 37 years - at the Institute of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway. He has broad interests in psychology and has been teaching and publishing in cognitive, social, personality and clinical psychology. While well known for his contageous enthusiasm when teaching he was eager for a change and took an early retirement from his position as professor of psychology from January 1999.
At about that time Johan Galtung - who had known Finn for a few decades - had enlisted Finn in his TRANSCEND network, and he is co-author with Johan Galtung on "Crafting Peace: On the Psychology of the TRANSCEND Approach" in J. Galtung et.al. (Eds.), Searching for Peace. The Road to TRANSCEND. Pluto Press, 151-170.
Eager to get some real knowledge about conflicts and conflict transformation Finn went to Australia to study with John McDonald and David Moore. Finn then brought his Australian friends to Norway to give workshops, and he has since been a consultant to Norwegian projects using conferencing. Conferencing is a key approach within the Restorative Justice movement, which is an alternative to the dominant Retributive Justice approach. Furthermore, conferencing provides a far greater emphasis on emotional processes than usual cognitive approaches. He has published about conferencing in Norwegian, and with Bob Neimeyer in the book chapter: R. A. Neimeyer & F. Tschudi (2003) Community and Coherence in G. D. Fireman et.al. (Eds.), Narrative and Consciousness. Oxford University Press,166-191.
A further article on "suspected sexual abuse" with Sissel Reichelt: When therapy is stuck: What about conferencing? has been published in 2004 in the Journal of Systemic Therapy, 23, 38-52.
Finn has also written a programmatic paper on how restorative principles may be extended to handling large, controversial projects, NEWWAYS.DOC
Finn greatly enjoys participating in a voluntary association dedicated to preserving a unique bird wildlife area and a surrounding landscape with a rich cultural heritage, situated just a few minutes by car from the centre of Oslo. A farm in this area is a center for a foundation working to educate young leaders from Palestine, Jordan and Israel to peacefully cooperate, a project Finn is eagerly supporting. "mep" denotes "Middle East Project." Finn talked about all this (also touching 9/11) in a keynote address: Conflict Transformation: The Road from Alienation to Solidarity at The World Peace Foundation, Novembre 19, 2002 at LaCrosse, WI.
Otherwise Finn has for several years been dedicated to perfecting a set of computer programs - MULTIGRID - useful for at a group level mapping cultural climate and homo/heterogeneity, at an individual level helping client and therapist together mapping viable paths to a better life, and/or evaluating the impact of therapy. Much to his surprise the system has also been found useful in quite different fields as e.g. a current project which maps how Swedish auditors – in the wake of Enron etc. – think about their current and possible future tasks. An article about this is under review in European Journal of Accounting. How auditors work raise the problem of the relative importance of rules vs. more overriding principles.
Congruent with his interest in emotions Finn has written a paper arguing for the importance of intuitive, holistic thinking: "Rules, Complexity and Emotions" and a Swedish version will appear in a Swedish book devoted to critical issues about the way auditors go about their tasks.
Interest in grid methodology has been spurred by a long standing interest in mapping structure for a single individual, and a concomitant distrust in usual methodology where individual structures often are lost when comparing means. An overriding interest is whether and to what extent multivariate methods can reveal latent structures by "purifying" manifest data of "noise." This was in fact the topic of his doctoral dissertation: The Latent, the Manifest and the Reconstructed in Multivariate Data Reduction Models. A Study of Multidimensional Scaling and Similarities Data. University of Oslo, 1972.
Currently Finn's interest in similarity has been rekindled by considering how much greater our concern is for those close to us than for those seen to be very different. When psychological distance is concomitant with hostility, derogation and cruelty this raises the problem of how this can be reversed – what are the possibilities for humanizing relations? What can conferencing contribute, and what other approaches as for instance the Mep project mentioned above are viable?
Finn is a member of the editorial board of Journal of Constructivist Psychology, and the advisory board of Proactive-resolutions.com which is headed by John McDonald.
Please see:
•  Accepting Vulnerability – Necessary for a Good Society?, revised draft of paper for Telemark Symposium August 18-21, 2005.
•  Frihet som motmakt: Venstresiden må ta frihetsbegrepet tilbake!, a short version of which was published in Klassekampen, 20th April 2006. Finn appreciates comments at finn.tschudi@psykologi.uio.no!
•  Reflections on World Parliament Experiment, WPE, at isfit 2007.
   

HOWARD ZEHR
Howard Zehr is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
He is Professor of Sociology and Restorative Justice and an internationally-known practitioner, writer, lecturer and teacher in the field of criminal justice. He is considered one of the founders of the contemporary restorative justice movement and his ground-breaking book, Changing Lenses: A New Focus for Crime and Justice, is widely regarded as a standard in the field. The author was one of the early pioneers in victim-offender mediation and continues to be involved in this and related work. One of his primary areas of concern is the role of victims in justice and especially in restorative justice programs. He and a colleague were appointed by the federal court in the Timothy McVeigh Oklahoma City bombing trial to assist attorneys in working with victims. Out of this developed a program of exchange visits of survivors from the U.S. embassy bombing in Nairobi, Kenya and the bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City. Another outcome is an ongoing initiative to sensitize defense attorneys to victims' perspectives and to incorporate survivors' voices in death penalty cases.
Professor Zehr has lectured, consulted and trained in several dozen countries throughout the world. He has worked with community groups, police and correctional agencies in countries such as Northern Ireland, England, Russia, Jamaica, Bosnia, New Zealand and South Africa. He is also an accomplished documentary and journalistic photographer. He has worked professionally as a photojournalist, photographing in some 20 countries, and has conducted numerous photo-interview projects. After serving 19 years as director of the national criminal justice office of Mennonite Central Committee, an international humanitarian organization, in 1996, Howard Zehr joined the faculty of EMU's Conflict Transformation Program.
Apart from Changing Lenses, Professor Zehr has published widely, see, for example, Doing Life: Reflections of Men and Women Serving Life Sentences (Good Books, 1998); Transcending: Reflections of Crime Victims - Portraits and Interviews (Good Books, 2001); and The Little Book of Restorative Justice (Good Books, 2002).

   
MICHAEL ROPER
Michael Roper, Sociology Department, University of Essex, UK
   
DAVID R. BRUBAKER
David R. Brubaker is an Assistant Professor of Conflict Studies at the Conflict Transformation Program, Eastern Mennonite University, Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA. He earned a BS in Business Administration from Messiah College and an MBA in Global Economic Development from Eastern University. He is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Arizona specializing in religious and organizational conflicts. In 1997 he and four partners founded Cooperative by Design – An Arizona Peacebuilding Consortium which provides a range of consulting and peacebuilding services to not-for-profit organizations, educational institutions, governmental organizations and corporations. Prior to this he served in a number of community development, mediation and human services organizations. These roles included serving as the associate director of Mennonite Conciliation Service for two years and serving as assistant director of Mennonite Central Committee’s Recife, Brazil program where he became fluent in Portuguese. Dave is the author of numerous articles on conflict transformation.
   
JAYNE SEMINARE DOCHERTY
Jayne Seminare Docherty, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Conflict Studies Conflict Transformation Program, Eastern Mennonite University, Virginia, USA.
   

VERNON JANTZI
Vernon Jantzi, Ph.D., is a Professor of Sociology at the Conflict Transformation Program at Eastern Mennonite University, Virginia, USA.
Dr. Jantzi is an international development specialist with extensive experience in Africa, Asia and Latin America, working at the interface of peacebuilding and development. He has worked for multi-lateral, bi-lateral and NGO organizations. His current research interest is in the evaluation of peacebuilding, development and humanitarian assitance programs and practices, particularly efforts that purport to foster broad participation of displaced and dispossessed persons in providing for or managing their own welfare. He is also keenly interested in post-conflict humanitarian response and social reconstruction. Dr. Jantzi frequently serves as a consultant to development, peacebuilding and humanitarian assistance programs. He is one of the founders and a past director of the graduate program in Conflict Transformation at Eastern Mennonite University. He holds a Ph.D. in the Sociology of Development from Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.

   
CHANTAL LOGAN
Chantal Logan, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor at the Eastern Mennonite University, Virginia, USA. Dr. Logan was born in Paris, France. She earned a B.A. and an M.A. with a focus in French linguistics from the University of Paris-Nanterre and a PhD in comparative literature from the University of Limoges, France. Her other fields of study include psychotherapy, Islamic studies, and conflict resolution. Dr. Logan comes to EMU with many years experience teaching French and Spanish. For most of her married life, she and her husband have served the church in different capacities in Argentina, Colombia, DJibouti, France, and the US. Most recently, they served three years as co-directors for the Somali program in Kenya, sponsored by Eastern Mennonite Missions and Mennonite Central Committee. She has managed many programs including Development, peacebuilding and Conflict Resolution, Humanitarian Assistance. Dr. Logan values "academic excellence combined with intellectual honesty."
   
JOSEPH AGHOLOR
Joseph Agholor, Ph.D., London School of Management and Technology, London, UK.
   
TONY JENKINS
Tony Jenkins is also a Member of the HumanDHS Education Team.
He is the Coordinator as well as Director of Administration and Research at the Peace Education Center of Teachers College, Columbia University and the General Coordinator of the International Institutes on Peace Education (IIPE), planning and coordinating institutes in the Manila, Seoul, and Istanbul and in 2005, Rhodes, Greece. His current work focuses on pedagogical research and educational design with emphasis on disarmament, gender and human rights education. Tony regularly conducts courses and workshops in peace education at Teachers College New York and Tokyo campuses, and at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace in Costa Rica.
   

zembylas

MICHALINOS ZEMBYLAS
Michalinos Zembylas is Associate Professor of Educational Theory and Curriculum Studies at the Open University of Cyprus. His research interests are in the areas of educational philosophy and curriculum theory, and his work focuses on exploring the role of emotion and affect in curriculum and pedagogy. He is particularly interested in how affective politics intersect with issues of social justice pedagogies, intercultural and peace education, and citizenship education. Zembylas is the author of numerous articles as well as the books, Teaching With Emotion: A Postmodern Enactment (Information Age Publishing, 2005), Five Pedagogies, a Thousand Possibilities: Struggling for Hope and Transformation (Rotterdam, The Netherlands: SensePublishers, 2007), and The Politics of Trauma in Education (New York, Macmillan Palgrave, 2008). He is also co-editor of Peace Education in Conflict and Post-conflict Societies: Comparative Perspectives (with C. McGlynn, Z. Bekerman, & T. Gallagher, New York: Palgrave, MacMillan, 2009, Winner of the 2011 Jackie Kirk Outstanding Book Prize of the Comparative & International Education Society), ICT for Education, Development, and Social Justice (with C. Vrasidas and G. Glass, Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing, 2009), Advances in Teacher Emotion Research (with Paul Schutz, Springer, 2009) and Integrated Education in Conflicted Societies. (with C. McGlynn, & Z. Bekerman, New York: Palgrave, MacMillan, 2013), His latest book (with Zvi Bekerman) is entitled Teaching Contested Narratives: Identity, Memory and Reconciliation in Peace Education and Beyond (Cambridge University Press, 2012).

   

christodoulou
ELENI CHRISTODOULOU
Eleni Christodoulou is a final-year Doctoral Researcher at the Department of Political Science and International Studies, University of Birmingham, UK. Throughout her doctoral studies she has been a Universitas 21 PhD Fellow at the University of New South Wales, Australia, a PhD Visiting Researcher at the University of Tübingen, Germany, and has completed an ESRC-funded placement at the Scrutiny Unit of the House of Commons, UK. She holds a BA in Modern History (First Class), an MA in Political Science (Research Methods), and an MA in Diplomacy (Distinction) from the University of Birmingham. Her thesis, titled 'The Politics of Peace Education in Cyprus' investigates the discursive power struggle over education in the context of the Cyprus conflict. Her research interests include pedagogical peacebuilding; Gramsci and peace education; gender and peacebuilding; peace journalism; history and collective memory; the role of emotions in re-constituting national identity during socio-economic crises. As a member of the HumanDHS Research Team she is interested in exploring the nexus between peace education and human dignity, as well as the collective memory of humiliation passed through generations.
   

ABELARDO BRENES
Abelardo Brenes, Ph.D., is the Director of the M.A. Programme in Peace Education at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace in San José, Costa Rica. He has been a Professor at the Department of Education for Peace (2003-2004), a Senior Advisor at the Department of Education for Peace (2001-2002), Deputy to the Vicerrector (2000), General Director and National Director (Costa Rica) of the Central-American Programme for a Culture of Peace and Democracy (1999-2001), Academic Coordinator of the 2nd Phase of the Central-American Programme for a Culture of Peace and Democracy (1996-1999), General Director of the 1st Phase of the Central-American Programme for a Culture of Peace and Democracy (1994-1996), Director, Central American Programme for the Promotion of Human Rights and Peace Education (sponsored by the European Union, 1992-1993), and Director, Seeking the True Meaning of Peace Conference (volunteer, 1987-1989).
His most recent activities at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace are the design, planning, and recruitment of professors, the selection of students, and the direction of the Masters Programme in Peace Education.
Abelardo Brenes earned his Ph.D. (Psychology, 1977) from the University of Birmingham, England, a B.A. (Psychology) from Universidad de Costa Rica (Honours, 1971), a B.A. (Sociology) from Universidad de Costa Rica, (Honours, 1971).
His main publications in peace and education related areas are as follows:
•  Brenes, A., Teaching Critical Thinking Skills in Costa Rica ", in Homann, R., Huhn, H. P. & Sinton, J. (eds.), The Future of Higher Education, Frankfurt / New York: Campus Verlag, 1987, pp. 101-112.
•  Brenes, A. (Editor), The Comparative Psychology of Natural Resource Management, Advances in Comparative Psychology, Vol. 1, Nápoles, Italy: International Society for Comparative Psychology, 1989.
•  Brenes, A., "Educating for Universal Responsibility", Peace Review, Vol. 2, No. 2, Spring 1990, pp. 33-36.
•  Brenes, A & Gang, P., "Toward a Global Curriculum for Peace and Sustainable Development. An Interview with Abelardo Brenes by Phil Gang", Holistic Education Review, Vol. 3, No. 4, Winter 1990, pp. 57-60.
•  Brenes, A. (Editor), Seeking the True Meaning of Peace, University for Peace Press, Costa Rica, 1991.
•  Brenes, A. "Conference on Peace Education Develops Programs for Central America ". Psychology International, Vol. 3, No. 1, Winter 1992.
•  Brenes, A. "Educacao Ambiental", en Ciencia, Educacao e Ecología, Asociacio Educacional e Cultura Holistica, Belo Horizonte, Brasil, 1992.
•  Brenes, A. "Educating for Universal Responsibility", en Holistic Science and Human Values 1992, Adyar, Madras, India. Theosophy Science Centre, 1992, pp. 67-74.
•  Brenes, A., Takehito Ito & The Project "Preparedness for Peace", Peace Education: Perspectives from Costa Rica and Japan, Peace Education Miniprints, No. 62, April 1994, Malmo, Sweden.
•  Brenes, A., Co-editor, with Michael Wessels, of a Special Issue of Peace and Conflict. Journal of Peace Psychology, on the theme "Psychological Contributions to Building Cultures of Peace" (Volume 7, Number 2, 2001). Author of the following papers in this issue:
•  Abelardo Brenes & Michael Wessels, "Introduction: Psychological Contributions to Building Cultures of Peace"
•  Abelardo Brenes and Deborah Du Nann Winter, "Earthly Dimensions of Peace: The Earth Charter".
•  Brenes, A., "An Integral Approach to Education for Peace", en UNESCO Chairs on Human Rights, Democracy, Peace and Tolerance, Bulletin 3, December 2001, Stadtschlaining, Austria, 162-166.
•  Brenes, A. and Rojas, A., co-authors of the Serie Didáctica "Construyendo la Cultura de Paz en nuestra comunidad", Programa Cultura de Paz y Democracia en América Central, edited and produced by CIIP/UPEACE, Uruguay, 2002.
•  Brenes, A.,"The Earth Charter Principles: Source for an Ethics of Universal Responsibility", en P. Miller & L. Westra (eds.), Just Ecological Integrity, The Ethics of Maintaining Planetary Life, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2002.
•  Brenes, A. "Il programma di cultura di pace e di democrazia in Centro America ", en G. Ambrosi, M.de Rose & F.Pinto Minerva (eds.), I Percosi dell'integrazione. L'educazione per la pace: tra informazione e formazione, Italia: Tecnodid Editrice, 2002.
•  Brenes, A., Navarro, P. & Román, Sergio, "Elementos de la Buena Noticia, para apoyar la posibilidad de elaborar información positiva", Working Paper, University para la Paz, 2002.
•  Brenes, A., "University for Peace/UNITWIN Chair in Education for Peace", en UNESCO Chairs in Human Rights, Democracy, Peace and Tolerance, Bulletin, 4, November 2002, Stadtschlaining, Austria.
•  Brenes, A. "University for Peace", in Guide to United Nations Resources and Activities for the Prevention of Interpersonal Violence, published by Injuries and Violence Prevention Department, Noncommunicable Diseases and Mental Health Cluster, World Health Organization, Geneva, 2002, pp. 31-32.
•  Brenes, A. "Promoting Education for Peace Worldwide: the University for Peace", in Sang Saeng, Magazine of the Asia-Pacific Centre of Education for International Understanding, No. 7, June, 2003, Seoul, Korea, pp. 5-11.
•  Brenes, A., "Education for Peace in the Costa Rican Context: A Model of Peaceful Personhood", Bulletin of UNESCO Chairs in Human Rights, Democracy, Peace and Tolerance, No. 5, Stadtschlaining, Austria, December 2003, pp. 115-119.
•  Brenes, A., "An Integral Model of Peace Education", in A.L. Wenden (Ed.), Educating for a Culture of Social and Ecological Peace, Albany: State University of New York Press, 2004, pp. 77-98.
•  Brenes, A., "¿Qué está detrás de la violencia juvenil?", in R. Pérez-Sánchez (Ed.), Psicología y comunicación de masas. Aportes para su desarrollo en Costa Rica. San José: Universidad de Costa Rica, 2004, pp. 63-77.
• Brenes, A., Universal and Differentiated Responsibility: A thematic essay on responsibility to the whole Earth community and to promote the common good,
in Peter Blaze Corcoran, Mirian Vilela, and Alide Roerink (Eds.), The Earth Charter in Action, pp. 35-37. Amsterdam: KIT Publishers, in cooperation with the Earth Charter Initiative, San Jose, Costa Rica.

   
RUBÉN ALBERTO CHABABO
Rubén A. Chababo is a Literature Professor, who graduated from the National University of Rosario (Universidad Nacional de Rosario) in 1987. He is an Assistant Professor of Nineteenth Century Argentine Literature at the Humanities and Arts School of Rosario, and a Literature Professor at Bialik Institute in Rosario. Since December 2002, he has been the Director of the Museo de la Memoria (Museum of Memory) in the city of Rosario, pertaining to a branch of the Secretary of Culture of the Municipality of Rosario, which is the first governmental institution devoted to reconstructing and safekeeping the memory of the recent past linked to the last military dictatorship, in power from 1976 to 1983.
In 1989 the United Nations Program granted him a fellowship in order to complete post-graduate studies in the Central University of Las Villas (Universidad Central de Las Villas) in Cuba, where he wrote his thesis on the Cuban artistic vanguard of the 1920s, under the supervision of Doctor Aimé Bolaños.
In 1992, as a fellowship holder of the Latin American Institute of Cooperation (Instituto de Cooperación Iberoamericana) in Madrid, he finished his second post-graduate thesis focused on the subject of exile in Spanish-Hebraic poetry, under the supervision of Doctor Manuel Alvar. That same year, he was granted a fellowship by the Institute of Scientific and Technical Research (Instituto de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas - C.S.I.C) to complete his pre-doctoral course in the city of Malaga on the Indian Chronicles.
For his research on Orígenes magazine, a Cuban cultural and literary publication of the 1950s, he was granted a fellowship from the Ministry of Culture of the Province of Santa Fe in 1994. He has also been awarded grants for research by the Deutscher Akademischer Austaauschdienst in 1996; the National Fund for the Arts (Fondo Nacional de las Artes) in the field of "creation" in 1998; and again the Ministry of Culture of the Province of Santa Fe in 1998 for his investigation on the subject of migrations and banishments.
He has worked on archives and bibliographical compilation at the National Library of Havana, Casa de las Américas, and the National Library of Madrid, as well as the Iberoamerikanische Institut of Berlin, where he investigated the controversies between the intellectuals and the political power in the years following the victory of the Cuban revolution.
As a guest professor, he has been invited to lecture, dictate courses and coordinate graduate seminars on Latin American Literature at Potsdam University in 1996 and Pescara University in 1998, among others.
His numerous journalistic pieces and essays are regularly published in specialized publications, newspapers and magazines with local, national and international circulation, oriented toward cultural, political and social issues. Since 1990 he has been coordinating reading and discussion workshops on the subject of contemporary Latin American literature.
His published book entitled Moradas (Dwellings) deals with the search for our individual place in the world, exile and banishment in contemporary society. The text was based on the oral testimonies of immigrants residing in Argentina and of political exiles.
In the last few years, he has focused his attention on the investigation of testimonial literature dealing with situations and experiences in concentration camps. He is researching the Diaries of the Italian Giovanni Guareschi, a survivor of Buchenwald concentration camp, and the memoirs of Margarette Buber Neumann, a survivor of Ravensbruk camp. His essay on the personality of Jack Fuchs, a survivor of Auschwitz, received first prize from the Memory of the Holocaust Foundation in 1998.
He proposed and organized the Journeys entitled Faced with the limit: reflections on the subject of the Holocaust and the dictatorial experiences in Latin America, in cooperation with the authorities of INADI (National Institute Against Discrimination) in the National University of Rosario, which took place in October-November 2001. He has dictated courses on the complexity of conveying concentration camp experiences in educational institutions, and participated in research projects on the problematic of genocide.
At present, he is working on the compilation of material for his work on a broader book concerning the Chacabuco concentration camp, located in the Puna de Atacama in Chile.
   
ISLAM ELSANOV
Islam Elsanov is a Writer, Filmmaker, and Chechen/Russian-speaking North-Caucasus Specialist based in Stavanger, Norway.
   

RAÏS NEZA BONEZA
Raïs Neza Boneza (Norway/ Democratic Republic of Congo [Ex-Zaire]), BA in Social Sciences, MA of Humanities, Author and Poet. He currently lives in Norway where he works as a peace researcher and practitioner. Raïs is also a poet who besides writing his own poetry works to promote artistic expressions as a means to deal with conflicts and maintaining mental well-being and spiritual growth after surviving war. Although Boneza may - sometimes at least - have wished to forget his experiences of war in the conflict ridden Great Lake region, he has never forgotten about both the richness and misery of Africa. He has lived in the east and in the west of the D. R. Congo, in Rwanda, in Burundi, and Uganda. He has learned seven African languages as well as the European imperialistic languages and has got first-hand knowledge of the cultures of various tribes and the main ethnic groups in the region. This background, combined with his sensitive artistic mind and his scholarly background including his collaboration with one of the founders of peace research Johan Galtung, has equipped his analytical faculties with unique instruments to extend the project that Galtung has developed since the mid 90', to the African continent. He leads www.transcendafrica.org, Buildingpeaces.org/African Co-ordinator, he is the Director of the T:AP Refugees Project, he is furthermore a representative of IDEAL International and works as an Advisor for the Human Rights House/Advisor Group in Trondheim. Please see here:
•  Peace by African’s Peaceful Means: Obstacles and Resources to Peace, rapport of the Projects Initiated in the Great Lakes Region of Africa, Uganda-Burundi-D.R.Congo, 2005-2006.
•  Toward the Ubuntu-ization of the World: A Khemetic/African Perspective on the Middle East Crisis/Crime
Gitega (Burundi/East-Africa)

   

G. GLADSTON XAVIER
Gladston Xavier (India) is a Fulbright Fellow who studied conflict transformation. He presently lectures in Loyola College affiliated to the University of Madras. He works among the refugees, people living with HIV/AIDS and the dalits in India. He has been trained in Street theater, Playback theater and theater of the oppressed. He also gives theater workshop for different groups. He is presently pursuing his Ph.D. I Social Work on the peace process in Sri Lanka. The title of his project is A Qualitative Study on the Sri Lankan Tamil Refugees Living in Camps in Tamil Nadu on the Humiliation that they Face.
Please see also:
Florina Benoit & Joseph Xavier (2006),The Life of Sri Lankan Refugees A Paradigm Shift, abstract presented at the Second International Conference on Multicultural Discourses, 13-15th April 2007, Institute of Discourse and Cultural Studies, & Department of Applied Psychology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, as part of the 9th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.

   
RICHARD BURNS
Richard Burns has enjoyed a truly international lifestyle having been born in the UK and then living in every 'civilised' country from Canada to South Africa. After several years of working as a musician and music teacher, he left Australia in 2000 in order to work at SIS. In 2002 he made "mistake of his life" and moved to Manchester where he completed a MSc in Applied Psychology, involving a dissertation looking into The Sources and Symptoms of Stress Reported by a Sample of International Teachers. Richard Burns has experience teaching at Special Needs School, High School, 6th Form College and University level. At Skagerak International School in Norway he is the University/Careers Advisor, School Counsellor, Teacher of English, History and TOK. Richard Burns is currently doing a Ph.D. focusing on the effects of school organisational climate on teacher well-being.
   
IVAN LEUDER
Ivan Leuder, Ph.D., Manchester University, UK.
   
MARTIN FARRELL
Dr. Martin Farrell received his Ph.D. from the University of Strathclyde in 1993. He then held a Royal Society/SERC postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Aix-Marseille in France from 1993-1995. From 1995-1997 he was a postdoctoral research fellow on a project funded by the Stroke Association at the Medical Research Council Applied Psychology Unit in Cambridge. He has been a lecturer at the Department of Psychology, University of Manchester, since 1997.
   
MONS BENDIXEN
Mons Bendixen, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim.
   
FRANÇOIS AUDIGIER
François Audigier, Professor, Faculty of Educational Sciences and Psychology at the University of Geneva, Switzerland.
   
WILLIAMS R. O’NEILL
Williams R. O’Neill, Ph.D., Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley, USA.
   
VAN DER LINDEN
Van der Linden, Professor, Department of Cognitive Psychopathology, University of Geneva, Switzerland.
   
ABDELJALIL AKKARI
Abdeljalil Akkari is a Director of Research at the Higher Pedagogical Institute HEP-BEJUNE in Bienne, Switzerland. His major publications include studies on educational planning, multicultural education, teacher training and educational inequalities. Her main research interests focuses on Europe, Africa and Latin America. He is also consultant for the International Bureau of Education (UNESCO).
Please see here some of his publications:
Akkari, A. (2004). Paulo Freire: De l'oppression de la pédagogie à la pédagogie des opprimés. Education Permanente, 2, 60-62.
Akkari, A. (2003). The Euro-Arab dialogue: An educational Bridge. What is a education's role. Prospects, vol XXXIII (4), 397-403.
Akkari, A. (2002). Towards a Critical Perspective in Citizenship Education. World Studies in Education.
Akkari, A. (2002). Review of "Non-Western Educational Traditions: Alternative Approaches to Educational Thought and Practice". Contemporary Psychology, 47(2).
Ferrer, F. & Akkari, A. (2002). L'éducation interculturelle en Espagne et en Suisse: une analyse comparative. Migrations Themes, 17 (3), 239-264.
Akkari, A. (2002). Langues, pouvoir et éducation au Maghreb. DiversCité Langues.
Akkari, A. (2001). Pedagogy of the Oppressed and the Challenge of Multicultural Education. Interchange. A Quarterly Review of Education, 32(3), 271-293.
   
CHARLES MAGNIN
Charles Magnin, Professor of History of Education, at Geneva University, Department of Psychology and Educational Sciences.
   
SANDRA HELENA CACHENOT
Sandra Helena Cachenot, Psychologist.
   
ALTAF ULLAH KHAN
Altaf Ullah Khan is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Journalism & Mass Communication at the University of Peshawar, in Pakistan. Dr. Khan has been the co-organiser of a series of Journalist Training Workshops in 2005. The Workshops were funded by UNESCO. They were aimed at capacity building of the District Correspondents in the periphery, the rural areas of NWFP. Dr. Khan is the author of the initial project and is also responsible for the final report to UNESCO, which has been accepted. Dr. Khan has furthermore written the manual for a training workshop in May 2005 and the reports, the first one in December 2005, and the final one in March 2006.
Dr. Khan has earned his PhD on a similar topic: Profile of Journalists in Peshawar, a social psychological profile of journalists. He is also the editor of the book News Media and Journalism in Pakistan and Germany, the first of the series Communication, Media, and Social Change. He is the co-editor of the series together with his academic advisor (Doktorvater), Prof. Dr. Arnulf Kutsch, Chair of Historical and Systematic Communication Science, Institute for KMW, University of Leipzig.
   
FLOYD WEBSTER RUDMIN
Floyd Webster Rudmin is Co-Director and Co-Coordinator of the HumanDHS Stop Hazing and Bullying Project and the HumanDHS World Gender Relations for Equal Dignity Project, as well as the HumanDHS Apology Project. He is also a member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, and the HumanDHS Advisory Board.
Floyd Webster Rudmin, Ph.D., is a Professor of Social and Community Psychology at the University of Tromsø in Norway. He earned his B.A. in Philosophy in Bowdoin College, his M.A. in Audiology in SUNY, Buffalo, his M.A. in Psychology at Queen's University, Canada, and his Ph.D. in Psychology from Queen's University, Canada. His research interests include cognitive history (psychology of historical beliefs), psychology of ownership, cross-cultural psychology, statistical methods, peace research, and history of psychology.
His paper Debate in Science: The Case of Acculturation won the 2004-2005 Klineberg Intercultural and International Relations Award given by SPSSI (Div. 9 of the APA). Please see here the full text version.
Please see also:
•  Seventeen Early Peace Psychologists, in Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 31 (2, Spring), 1991, pp. 12-43. Altaf Ullah Khan commented (23rd July 2006, in a personal message): "This reminds me of George Herbert Mead's concept of Universals. He was also in favour of developing a universal human society where interactive/rational dialogue prevails. I had never studied psychology as a discipline, but in my journey for self-discovery I have read Freud and Jung and have also gone through mythology and Sufism. I remember one Sufi saying at the very onset of a book: Sufism is to avoid preconceptions."
•  co-authored with Kristina Ostvik, Bullying and Hazing Among Norwegian Army Soldiers: Two Studies of Prevalence, Context, and Cognition, in Military Psychology, 2001, 13 (1), 17-39.
•  G. B. Grundy's 1917 Proposal for Political Psychology: "A Science Which Has Yet to Be Created", in ISPP News, 12 (2), 2005, pp. 6-7.
•  Six Research Designs on Humiliation, abstract presented at Round Table 2 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 15-16, 2005.
•  Charles Robert Richet: Pioneer of Peace Psychology, in Peace Psychology Newsletter, in press.
•  Daniel Droba Day (1898-1998): Attitudes Towards War As a Cause of War, i n Peace Psychology, in press.
•  How History Allows Insight into the Malady of American Militarism, abridged version published by CounterPunch, vol.13. no.1, January 1-15, pp.1, 4-6, posted Feb. 17, 2006 at http://www.counterpunch.org/rudmin02172006.html as
"Plan Crimson: War on Canada: Secret War Plans and the Malady of American Militarism."
•  Preventing Inadvertent Humiliation, abstract presented at the 2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 14-15, 2006.
•  Franziska Baumgarten (1883 - 1970): Early Female, Jewish, Peace Psychologist, in Peace Psychology, in press.
•  The Apologies Project: Small Wins Ways to Reduce Militarizing Memories, abstracts presented at the 2010 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 9-10, 2010.
   

adolf
ANTONY ADOLF
Antony Adolf, author of Peace: A World History, was born in Montreal of Egyptian and Greek parents and currently lives in Chicago where he teaches. He received his B.A. from the University of Illinois, M.A. from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, and a post-graduate certificate from Cornell University’s School of Criticism and Theory. Visit and subsribe to his blog, "One World, Many Peaces."
   

mohamed

WAEL MOHAMED
Wael Mohamed is a Clinical Pharmacologist, Neuroscientist and Psychiatrist. He dedicates his career to neurological research and medical teaching. His research focuses on advancing knowledge and understanding of neurological diseases through unconventional thinking. Therefore his basic and translational research targets the investigation and development of novel treatment for resistant diseases. During his graduate studies he learned how important cutting edge research and state of the art techniques for the advancement of medical therapies are. After finishing his training in a neurosurgery department during his house officer period, he started his career as a clinical pharmacologist with psychopharmacology as subspecialty.
His research focus is nutri-brain studies, especially early iron deficiency anemia, which is a global health issue. It is the most prevalent single nutrient deficiency in the world today. It is also the only nutrient deficiency, which is significantly prevalent in developing as well as industrialized countries. By using translational research and applying his medical knowledge he was able to relate the effects of early iron deficiency to cognition, especially attention and memory, in children. He found striking data, namely, that a brief period of iron deficiency during lactation can permanently impair attention shift. Furthermore, this deficit can, at least partially, be overcome by treatment with methylphenidate. This finding is particularly interesting considering the fact that early iron deficiency has a major impact on the development of dopamine systems. In subsequent research, he studied the characterization of brain catecholaminergic receptors densities.
Wael's ultimate goal is to find a gene expression profile for early iron deficiency anemia and to relate this to addiction. To achieve this he will utilize cocaine self-administration and various genetic analysis tools. His work has considerable significance, since, as mentioned above, iron deficiency is the most prevalent type of malnutrition worldwide. In his home country of Egypt, this is a major problem, leading to considerable cognitive impairment. Completing this work will greatly enhance the management and treatment of some cognitive disorders like ADHD, especially among school age children.
Regarding Wael's teaching philosophy, it is summarized by the acronym "LEARNING" which includes: Leadership, Energy, Analysis, Respect, Novelty, Imagination, Neighborhood and Growth. He values these concepts and tries his best to implement them in his courses.
Please see:
• The Hubris Syndrome and Arabic Spring, abstract presented at the 21st Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies "Search for Dignity," in South Africa, 25th - 28th April 2013.

   

pim
JOÁM EVANS PIM
Joám is part of the leadership team of the Center for Global Nonkilling and has as primary responsibility identifying, leading and/or overseeing research initiatives, including symposia, collection of critical data related to nonkilling, research committees and related activities. Joám followed graduate and undergraduate studies in Journalism, Anthropology and Politics. He was Professor of Media Studies at the University of Santiago de Compostela and Director of the Arab and Islamic Studies Program at Menéndez Pelayo International University. He is also Founding President of the Galizan Institute for International Security and Peace Studies and Board member of the Brazilian Institute for Nonkilling.
Please see:
• Toward a Nonkilling Paradigm, Honolulu, HI: Center for Global Nonkilling, June 2009.
   



Refugees and Humiliation Project (alphabetical)

VICTOR BOUDJOU ADANGBA
Victor Boudjou Adangba (USA/Ivory Coast) is a Doctoral Student in Moral Theology and Ethics at the Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley, USA. The title of his project is Immigrants, Refugees in West Africa and Humiliation.

   

ZAHID SHAHAB AHMED
Zahid Shahab Ahmed (Pakistan) is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
He is a Program Officer for the NGO Sahil in Pakistan. The title of his project is Refugees in South Asia and Humiliation.
Zahid Shahab Ahmed has done his Masters degree in Sociology and is holding a graduation degree in Economics & Journalism. He was also a scholar of the Summer School on Conflict Transformation with the Network University (TNU), Netherlands. Currently he is working for the non-governmental organization Sahil as a Program Officer Print-Networking. Sahil is the only organization in Pakistan, which is exclusively working against child sexual abuse.
Zahid has widely published on various issues, such as women's and children's rights, peace, diversity and coexistence, religion, and religious leaders. With his publications, he is working enthusiastically on raising awareness on various human rights peace issues.
Professionally Zahid has conducted research on social issues, especially including the ones related to human rights and conflict transformation. Currently, he is conducting research on Teachers' Attitudes towards the Indo-Pak Conflict: A case of India and Pakistan and also writing a case study on the first ever youth policy of Pakistan.
He has represented youth of Pakistan at the World Youth Peace Summit Asia-Pacific in 2004 in Bangkok, Thailand, at the Conflict Transformation Workshop in 2004 in New Delhi, India, at the New Tactics in Human Rights-International Symposium in 2004 in Ankara, Turkey, and at the UNESCO International Conference "Youth for Human Unity" in 2005 in Auroville, India.
Being a youth leader and a social research Zahid is having as his aim to ensure the participation of youth from all over the world in carrying the torch of peace for love and harmony.Please see his paper on Poverty, Family Stress & Parenting, March 2005, as well as his paper on the Situation of Human Rights in Bangladesh, 2005. See also Zahid's Report from Auroville (March 2005) and Poverty, Globalization, Social Customs & South Asian Children in Prostitution (April 2005).

   
JORGELINA GABRIELA ALMEIDA
Jorgelina Gabriela Almeida (Argentina) is specialising in Museum Conservation. The title of her project is Humiliation Policies Applied to Persecuted Individuals, Detainees and Refugees During the Period 1975/1983 in Rosario, Argentina.
   

JOHANNA TURNER BAKER
Johanna Turner Baker (UK) has graduated from Manchester University in 2004 with a first in Bsc in Psychology. She has some experience of research with refugees as she together with Jacquie, completed her third year research project with Dr. Ivan Leudar on the construction of identity in refugees, using a discourse analysis framework and focussing on reaction to stereotypes of refugees and also gender. The title of her project is An Existential Discourse Analysis of Humiliation as Reported by Iraqi Refugees in the UK and Denmark.
In the course of their research they had to find participants at local refugee meetings, then do in depth narrative interviews with the participants which Were then transcribed and analysed.
Jo's continuing interest in the field is shown by her visiting study groups at Manchester University, where some of the researchers present are doing research on refugees and immigrants.

   

FLORINA IMMACULATE MARY BENOIT
Florina Immaculate Mary Benoit (India) is completing her Ph.D. in Social Work on the quality of life of Sri Lankan Tamil refugees living in camps in Tamil Nadu. She has worked with the refugees for the last six years in various capacities. She does capacity building programs for different target groups. She uses theater to do most of her workshops. She has recently returned from United States after completing a Masters in Conflict Transformation with a Fulbright fellowship. The title of her project is A Qualitative Study on the Sri Lankan Tamil Refugees Living in Camps in Tamil Nadu on the Humiliation that they Face.
Please see also:
Florina Benoit & Joseph Xavier (2006), The Life of Sri Lankan Refugees A Paradigm Shift, abstract presented at the Second International Conference on Multicultural Discourses, 13-15th April 2007, Institute of Discourse and Cultural Studies, & Department of Applied Psychology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, as part of the 9th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.

   

tblikom
TUVA OTTERLEI BLIKOM
Tuva Otterlei Blikom (Norway) has a Bachelor of Arts in Media and Communications from Norwegian University of Technology and Science (NTNU) in Trondheim, Norway. She spent two semesters of her BA at the University in Stockholm, Sweden, studying gender in fiction films and gender science. In 2008, she finished her MA in Media and Communications at the University of Oslo (UiO), Norway. Her main areas of interest are popular culture, how it is expressed and how this unravels structures and tendencies in society and modern times. The title of her project was Being a Man is a Full-Time Job: A study on Masculinities in “Varg Veum – Bitter Flowers”, “Gangster” and “After the Wedding.” This thesis was written in cooperation with the Norwegian Ministry of Children and Equality, and it investigated the following questions: How are three Scandinavian men portrayed in the fiction film according to the idea of hegemonic masculinity? Do the movies maintain classical myths of gender through these portraits?
Tuva was an intern at Marked Access Providers Limited in Dhaka, Bangladesh, during the summer of 2007, and is currently working as a Project Assistant for the more extensive sorting of waste at source in Oslo, Agency for Waste Management, the City of Oslo, Norway. She also volunteers as a coordinator for a Save the Children home work group for youth.
   

MARI OTTERLEI BLIKOM
Mari Otterlei Blikom (Norway) has a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from University of Western Australia, Perth. She has studied one semester on Bali, Indonesia, and has just finished her Master's Degree in social psychology at the University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, Norway. Her field of interest is cross-cultural psychology, especially within the areas of marginalisation and social exclusion. She has got work experience with people in different life situations from jobs in the Norwegian social services. The title of her project is Understanding the Lives of Refugees Living in Exile: A Core Social Motive Approach, which she has developed into her Master Thesis (Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 7491 Trondheim, Norway). See furthermore Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People, note presented at "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005. Please see also Understanding the Lives of Refugees Living in Exile: A Core Social Motive Approach, Master Thesis, Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 7491 Trondheim, Norway.
See:
•  "Grunnleggende behov og følelsen av ydmykelse blant asylsøkere i norske asylmottak," lecture by Mari Blikom, Oslo kommune Bydel Grünerløkka Enhet for mangfold og integrering, 2. juni 2010

 

 

RAÏS NEZA BONEZA
Raïs Neza Boneza (Norway/ Democratic Republic of Congo [Ex-Zaire]), BA in Social Sciences, MA of Humanities, Author and Poet. The title of his project is Afro-Hitlerism: Historic of Cultural Humiliation in the Great-Lakes.
He currently lives in Norway where he works as a peace researcher and practitioner. Raïs is also a poet who besides writing his own poetry works to promote artistic expressions as a means to deal with conflicts and maintaining mental well-being and spiritual growth after surviving war. Although Boneza may - sometimes at least - have wished to forget his experiences of war in the conflict ridden Great Lake region, he has never forgotten about both the richness and misery of Africa. He has lived in the east and in the west of the D. R. Congo, in Rwanda, in Burundi, and Uganda. He has learned seven African languages as well as the European imperialistic languages and has got first-hand knowledge of the cultures of various tribes and the main ethnic groups in the region. This background, combined with his sensitive artistic mind and his scholarly background including his collaboration with one of the founders of peace research Johan Galtung, has equipped his analytical faculties with unique instruments to extend the project that Galtung has developed since the mid 90', to the African continent. He leads www.transcendafrica.org, Buildingpeaces.org/African Co-ordinator, he is the Director of the T:AP Refugees Project, he is furthermore a representative of IDEAL International and works as an Advisor for the Human Rights House/Advisor Group in Trondheim.

   
SADAF RASSOUL CAMERON
Sadaf Rassoul Cameron (Afghanistan) is a Peace Education Master students at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace (UPEACE), Costa Rica. The title of her project is Afghan Refugees in the United States: Before and After September 11th.
   

ALEX DAWSON
Alex Dawson (UK) graduated from Manchester University with a 2.1 in Psychology. He is currently working as a community counsellor in Manchester. The title of his project is An Existential Discourse Analysis of Humiliation as Reported by Iraqi Refugees in the UK and Denmark.
Always one to enjoy life, he has frequently been spotted at the Bar XS comedy night in Manchester, drinking beer and being occasionally pulled up on stage.
Alex has done volunteer and paid work with handicapped children for some time now, and says he enjoys the challenge and fun. He has done a wide variety of sports.

 


ANDREA ENDERS
Andrea Enders (Germany) is a journalist and fluent in English, Spanish, Italian, French. The title of her project is Humiliation and Human Strength: Stories of African-Spanish Migrations.
   

VICTORIA C. FONTAN
Victoria Christine Fontan is a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors, the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, the HumanDHS Global Core Team, the HumanDHS Research Team, and the HumanDHS Education Team. She is furthermore the former Co-Editor of the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (JHDHS).
Victoria is the Director of Academic Development, and Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace in San Jose, Costa Rica. As a Fellow to the Iraq Project at the CICR in Columbia University, Victoria is in charge of developing a permanent Conflict Resolution curriculum in northern Iraqi universities.
Prior to 2005, Victoria was Assistant Professor of Conflict Resolution at Salahaddin University, Erbil, Iraq. Previously, she was a Visiting Assistant Professor of Peace Studies at Colgate University, NY, where she lectured in conflict resolution and peace studies. Earlier, Victoria was a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at Sabanci University, in Turkey. She lectured in the MA Program in Conflict Resolution and Analysis and also conducts research on conflict resolution processes and the politics of communication.
Victoria holds a Ph.D. in Peace and Development Studies. She published various papers on multi-track diplomacy, human trafficking, the public diplomacy of armed groups and the formation of political violence in post-conflict societies. Central to her work has been a conceptualisation of post-conflict processes through the study of social, gendered, cultural, economic and political humiliation. She conducted field research in Lebanon with the Hezbollah, in Bosnia-Herzegovina on human trafficking and organised crime, and in Fallujah (post-Saddam Iraq) with emerging armed groups. She is also involved in gender training for peacekeeping operations, and has lectured to various armed forces on the subject.
Please see:
•  The Dialectics of Humiliation: Polarization between Occupier and Occupied in Post-Saddam Iraq (2003, unpublished Draft (Not to be cited without Author's authorization).
•  co-authored with Bertram Wyatt-Brown (2005), "The Honor Factor", Op Ed in The Baltimore Sun, January 23, 2005, p. 5F. Please see here the oringal long version.
•  "Hubris, History, and Humiliation: Quest for Utopia in Post-Saddam Iraq," in Social Alternatives (Special Issue "Humiliation and History in Global Perspectives"), Vol. 25, No. 1, First Quarter, pp. 56-61, 2006.
The title of her research project is Humiliation and Conflict Escalation in Post-Saddam Iraq: A Case Study of the Baghdad University Fallujah Refugee Camp.
• Voices from Post-Saddam Iraq: Living with Terrorism, Insurgency, and New Forms of Tyranny
Westport, CT: Greenwood/Praeger Security International.

   
GAKUBA THÉOGÈNE-OCTAVE
Gakuba Théogène-Octave, Ph.D. (Rwanda, Switzerland) is an Educational Psychologist, Ecologist, Postdoctorate and Lecturer at the Institute of Psychology, University of Lausanne, Switzerland. The title of his project is Frustration, Humiliation and Psycho-Social Suffering of Rwandan Refugees in Africa and Europe.
   

JEAN-DAMASCÈNE GASANABO
Jean-Damascène Gasanabo (Damas) is also a Member of our HumanDHS Global Core Team and Education Team.
Jean-Damascène Gasanabo (Damas) has a PhD in Education from the University of Geneva, Switzerland (2004) and his thesis pertains to the analysis of history textbooks and the construction of exclusive identities in Rwanda from 1962 to 1994. The Government of Rwanda appointed him as Director General in charge of the Research and Documentation Centre on Genocide, starting on May 21, 2012. The Centre is within the National Commission for the Fight against Genocide.
After his studies, Damas worked with UNESCO in Paris as Consultant in Education Sector for the project Fostering Peaceful Co-Existence through Analysis and Revision of History Curricula and School Textbooks in South-Eastern Europe (2005-2006). He has also collaborated as Programme Specialist for The United Nations Secretary-General’s Study on Violence against Children (2006). From October 2006 to August 2008, he was Head of Support for Communication, Research and Special Projects at Geneva Call, an international humanitarian organisation. Then he went back to UNESCO Headquarters in Paris as Consultant in the Sector of Education for the projects Education for Holocaust Remembrance and
Prevention of school related gender-based violence in post-conflict countries: from African case studies to international cooperation as well as in the Sector of Social and Human Sciences where he was responsible for producing Policy Briefs for the Management of Social Transformations (MOST) Programme. After Paris, he worked as Senior Consultant for Spectacle Learning Media and contributed on the project A Place to Learn: Review of International Research on Creating and Sustaining Enabling Conditions for Learning.
Damas has published various articles and contributed to a number of collective works including:
• “Two families, two destinies: A Personal Perspective on the Rwandan Genocide of 1994,” published by Professor Quintard Taylor, Faculty of History, University of Washington, Seattle, USA, August 2009. See: http://www.blackpast.org/?q=perspectives/two-families-two-destiniespersonal-perspective-rwandan-genocide-1994.
• “Rwandan Genocide: Sociological, Economic and Psychological Consequences”, In Seema Shekhawat & Debidatta Aurobinda Mahapatra (eds.), Afro-Asian Conflicts: Changing Contours, Costs and Consequences, 1st edition, New Delhi, New Century Publications, 2008, pp. 193-216
• « Le génocide des Tutsi du Rwanda » (co-authored with Jean-Pierre Chrétien), in Barbara Lefebvre & Sophie Ferhadjian (eds.), Comprendre les génocides du XXe siècle. Comparer – Enseigner, Paris, Bréal, 2007, pp. 130-153
• 
“School History and Mechanisms for the Construction of Exclusive Identities: The Case of Rwanda from 1962 to 1994”, in UNESCO-IBE, Textbooks and Quality Learning for All: Some Lessons Learned from International Experiences, Paris, UNESCO-IBE, 2006, pp. 365-404
• 
“The Rwandan Akazi (Forced Labour) System, History, and Humiliation”. Social Alternatives (Special Issue ‘Humiliation and History in Global Perspectives’), University of Queensland, Australia, Vol. 25, No. 1, First Quarter, 2006, pp. 50-55.

   

MANAS M. GHANEM
Manas M. Ghanem (Syria/USA) is a Fulbright scholar and Master’s Candidate at the Conflict Transformation Program, Eastern Mennonite University. Virginia, USA. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Law from the University of Damascus. She has experience in working with humanitarian and development organisations and the UN. She has worked as Protection Officer Assistant at the United Nations High Commission for Refugees in Damascus. She also works as a lawyer in civil and human rights with a specific interest in gender issues and restorative justice.
The title of her project is Iraqi Refugees in Syria and Jordan & Humiliation.

   

JACQUELINE HAYES
Jacqueline Hayes (UK) has graduated from Manchester University with a first degree in Psychology. Together with Johanna Turner Baker, she conducted research on the Social Identities of refugees. The title of her project is An Existential Discourse Analysis of Humiliation as Reported by Iraqi Refugees in the UK and Denmark.
Jacquie interviewed 6 refugees using a narrative biographical interview technique and Membership Categorisation Analysis (Sacks). This was a qualitative style looking in detail at language use and the building up of accounts (i.e. what kind of self does the participant present?). Her analysis focused on issues of stereotype and stigma associated with the social category of refugee.
Jacquie used Erving Goffman's work in her analysis; he writes a lot about "face-work" in social situations - his idea of face is very related to humiliation, especially in stigmatised social groups where the risk of humiliation is greater.
At the moment, Jacquie is working within mental health, dealing again with a heavily stigmatised group and one that is subject to much humiliation in society, in terms of mental health laws, humiliating and degrading treatments, and presentation in the media. 
In her spare time she does voluntary work with refugees at a homework club for children.

   
FEDERICO LAGGI
Federico Laggi, MA in Development Studies, is fluent in English, French, Italian, Spanish, was the Camp Manager of the UNHCR D'Jabal Refugee Camp for the Italian NGO INTERSOS (2004). He is currently Italy-Morocco Remittances Corridor Project Analyst. The title of his project is Humiliation and Human Strength: Stories of African-Spanish Migrations.
   

ALYI PATRICK LALUR
Alyi Patrick Lalur (Uganda/UK) is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, and Director and Coordinator of HumanDHS's Child Soldiers Worldwide Project.
He is currently enrolled for the Masters of Philosophy in International Peace Studies at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace with research interest in Justice and Reconciliation during period of war. The title of his project is Resilience, Humiliation and Adulthood Sexual Abuse: Understanding the Psychology of Violence Among Sudanese Refugees living in Uganda.
Alyi Patrick Lalur is the Executive Director of a Non-Governmental Organization called Landmines Awareness and Survivors Support Network (LASS-NET) Uganda and a consulting advisor for research on the demobilization, disarmament and reintegration of girl-child soldiers in Sierra Leone. Patrick Recently completed a comparative study of resilience among formerly abducted girls and boys.
Born in 1968 in the rural town of Gulu in Northern Uganda, Patrick attended High school at the prestigious King’s College Budo Kampala before graduating with BA (Hons) Degree in Public Administration and Psychology from Makerere University Kampala Uganda. Patrick holds two Masters degrees; MA in Counseling Psychology specializing in Psychology of war and Psychosocial rehabilitation of formerly abducted children in Northern and South-Western Uganda and MA in Peace Education with specialization in Peace Community Initiatives (PCI) project development.
Please see Child Soldiers Worldwide: Uncharted Cycles of Slavery Beneath the Surface of International Shame, paper presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 15-16, 2005.

   
ANA LJUBINKOVIC
Ana Ljubinkovic is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
She holds a Masters degree in the Theory and Practice of Human Rights and is currently doing her PhD in the Sociology Department at the University of Essex, UK. The research is entitled 'Collateral Effects or the New Wretched of the World: Invisible Victims of Human Rights Crusades'. Ana is currently working as a Graduate Teaching Assistant in the Sociology Department, University of Essex and as a temporary research officer for CARE International in Kenya. Main spheres of interest include sociology of human rights, military humanitarian intervention, ethnographic research, humiliation and refugees.
Please see Milk and Urine: Intentional Humiliation as a part of Humanitarian Assistance, note presented at "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005. Please see also From Violent to Subtle Humiliation: Case of Somali Victims of UNOSOM Living in the Refugee Camps in Kenya, note presented at Round Table 1 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 15-16, 2005. See furthermore Is Hope the Last to Die? Research Study On The Situational Analysis In The Dadaab Refugee Camps, 2005, and Report on Field Research Conducted in Dadaab Refugee Camps (16.05.05 - 01.06.05), 2005.
   
MIRIAM MARTON
Miriam H. Marton is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team.
Miriam Marton, attorney and social worker, is the William R. Davis Clinical Teaching Fellow at the Asylum and Human Rights Clinic, University of Connecticut School of Law. Professor Marton teaches and supervises law students representing refugees seeking asylum and other legal relief in the United States. Professor Marton also conducts research on the particular issues facing female refugees fleeing gender-based violence, both in the countries-of-origins and in the United States' legal system. Professor Marton's research interests also include training lawyers to work with survivors of gender-based violence.
Please see:
• Relevance of Sexual Violence Against Female Noncombatant Victims of Destructive Conflict in the Study of Humiliation, paper presented at the 2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, November 18-19, 2004.
• Terrorism and Humiliation, note presented at Round Table 1 of "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.
Humiliation in the Home: Survivors of Childhood Rape in the United States, note presented at Round Table 3 of "Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People," 5th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.
• Humiliation and Asylum Seekers, abstract presented at the 2011 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 8-9, 2011.
   
CEFERINO ROQUE MOREIRA
Ceferino Roque Moreira focused on Anthropology, History and Museum Conservation. The title of her project is Humiliation Policies Applied to Persecuted Individuals, Detainees and Refugees During the Period 1975/1983 in Rosario, Argentina.
   
ESPERANZA MORENO
Esperanza Moreno, BA, Justice Peace and Conflict Studies, is fluent in Spanish, and has experience in working with displaced women in Colombia and Venezuela. The title of her project is Humiliation and Human Strength: Stories of African-Spanish Migrations.
   

PETER MOSELY
Peter Mosely (UK) has graduated from Manchester University in 2004 with a 2.1 in Philosophy. His key papers included Heidegger & Anxiety, and Emotions & Responsibility: An Existential Analysis of the Euthanasia Problem; these were marked 80%. The title of his project is An Existential Discourse Analysis of Humiliation as Reported by Iraqi Refugees in the UK and Denmark.
For his dissertation, Pete did a study of action in relation to self, combining existential phenomenology and analytic philosophy. He has also been interested in Kierkegaard's concept of ontological despair.
Pete likes to read, and has an interest in alternative existential literature, including novels, poetry, psychoanalysis, critical psychiatry, psychology, and identity issues.
Pete is currently training as a person-centred counsellor; receiving counselling supervision and personal therapy. He is also currently writing a paper on African Philosophy and Frantz Fanon's existential analysis of ‘race' and colonialism in relation to person-centred counselling. Pete has experienced in Conversation Analysis from transcribing counselling sessions.
Pete is working in mental health. His job largely involves talking with people with psychiatric diagnoses (mainly the various forms of ‘schizophrenia'). One such instance is working with a man from Uganda, diagnosed chronic paranoid schizophrenic, who has recently begun to confront his racial and cultural anxieties after four months one-one with Pete as well as group therapy. He has recently considered himself to be "becoming well".
On Sunday evenings, Pete does volunteer work with young offenders. He also likes to do yoga.

 

 

JEAN BERCHMANS NDAYIZIGIYE
Jean Berchmans Ndayizigiye (USA/Africa) is a French Language Assistant at Eastern Mennonite University, Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA, and has a M.A. in Conflict Transformation from Eastern Mennonite University (2000). The title of his project is Refugees from the Great Lakes Region of Central Africa & Humiliation.
Jean earned a B.S. in Civil Engineer/Constructions from Louvain-La-Neuve, Belgium, a diploma in General Accounting and Business Management from Stratford Career Institute, Washington DC, and an M.A. in Conflict Transformation from Eastern Mennonite University. Jean is native of Burundi, a Central Africa French-speaking country; he also speaks Swahili and Kirundi. Jean's interest in peace and conflict studies comes from his experience of violent conflict in his home country and the Great Lakes Region of Central Africa. He occupied different senior positions in the government of Burundi, serving as Director of Public Work Laboratories and General Director of Roads in the Ministry of Public Works and as a Permanent Secretary of Adjudications in the Ministry of Finances. He has also served as the secretary of the Burundi International Peace Committee, a member of the Nairobi Peace-Net Steering Committee, the U.S. representative at the International Center for Dialogue and Reconciliation, and a volunteer for the Harrisonburg Refugee Resettlement Service. He is a charter member of the Michel Kayoya Foundation (a foundation for Peace, Justice, and reconciliation in Burundi based in the Netherlands), researching the Burundi conflict. Please see Humiliation and Violent Conflicts in Burundi, paper presented at Round Table 1 of the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 15-16, 2005.

   

ALPHONSE NSHIMIYIMANA
Alphonse Nshimiyimana (Rwanda/Costa Rica), United Nations-mandated University for Peace, Costa Rica. The title of his project is Humiliation and Refugees: The Legacy of Violence and Inaction in the Great Lake Region - The Uganda-Rwanda Scenario.
Nshimiyimana Alphonse was born in Gikongoro in southern Rwanda in 1967. He is now undertaking a master's degree at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace based in San José / Costa Rica in the Department of International Peace and Conflict Studies with specialization in Peace Education. Alphonse obtained his Bachelor's degree in Psychology and Science Education at the National University of Rwanda in 1999 with a thesis on The Consequences of the 1994 Genocide on Psychosocial Life of the Secondary School's Students. He has been a teacher in both primary and secondary schools and the head of department of human resources in the province of Kigali-Ngali. The horrible experience of the 1994 Rwandan genocide influenced his choice to work in the peace and conflict field. In 2001 he joined the Centre for Conflict Management (CCM) affiliated to the National University of Rwanda as a Research Assistant. Alphonse has been involved in various research/documentation activities, workshops and trainings organized by the CCM. These include the role of Gacaca Jurisdictions (traditional tribunals set up in order to deal with the large number of the suspects of the 1994 genocide) in the process of reconciliation in Rwanda, the Identity and Citizenship, Peace and Security in the Great Lakes Region, the 2003 Elections in Rwanda, the Land Conflicts in Rwanda and the analysis of International Instruments of peace. The main research findings were published in the Cahiers of the CCM. Alphonse's Master's thesis project expected to be completed in August 2005 focuses on Positive Parenting for Peace in Rwanda.

 

 

ONEN CHRISTINE HARRIET
Onen Christine Harriet (Uganda/Costa Rica) is currently a Masters' student at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace in Costa Rica in the Department of International Peace and Conflict studies specialising in Peace Education. The title of her project is Humiliation and Refugees: The Legacy of Violence and Inaction in the Great Lake Region - The Uganda-Rwanda Scenario.
Onen Christine Harriet is a Ugandan born in 1972. She is currently a Masters' student at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace in Costa Rica in the Department of International Peace and Conflict Studies specialising in Peace Education. Her current thesis project is on IDPs and humiliation in the northern Uganda scenario. Previously, Christine worked in Northern Uganda with the Human Rights Focus (HURIFO, an NGO working in the conflict spot of Northern Uganda with a mission to promote human rights awareness and respect, from the year 2000 to 2004) when she enrolled at UPEACE. She was in charge of monitoring and documentation of the human rights situation of the IDP camps in Uganda and co-authored a report entitled Between Two Fires on the plight of IDPs in Northern Uganda in the year 2002. The report details the human rights situation of the IDPs and the factors fuelling the constant humiliation and dehumanisation of the IDPs. She was furthermore active in the creation of human rights and responsibility awareness through mass radio sensitisation, coordination of HURIFO empowerment programmes: paralegal training, camp leaders training and local council one, two and three trainings and, women empowerment programmes. She also worked on the HURIFO's in house and mobile Information, Counselling and Legal Aid Project (ICLA) as well as the HURIFO Counselling Desk. Christine also lectured Chemistry and Biology at the Unyama National Teachers College upon attaining her degree in Education with specialisation in Biology and Chemistry from Makerere University in 1998. She was also the Deputy Headmistress of Gulu Girl's Secondary School a private initiative to promote the girl-child through education in the war rampaged north from 1998 to 2000.

 

 

VERONICA PACINI
Veronica Pacini (Italy/Costa Rica), United Nations-mandated University for Peace, doing her Master's Degree in the M.A. Programme in Peace Education. The title of her project is Humiliation and Refugees: The Legacy of Violence and Inaction in the Great Lake Region - The Uganda-Rwanda Scenario.
   
TOBIAS PECHMANN
Tobias Pechmann is a Student in International Politics, University of Marburg, fluent in German and English. The title of his project is Humiliation and Human Strength: Stories of African-Spanish Migrations.
   
MOIRA ROGERS
Moira R. Rogers, Ph.D., is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and part of the core HumanDHS Research Management Team.
She is Associate Professor of Spanish at Eastern Mennonite University and Intercultural Consultant for a variety of organizations in Germany, Spain, and the U.S. She has a Ph.D. in Science and Technology Studies from Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, an MA in Biblical Studies from the Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminaries, Elkhart, IN, and a Teaching Degree in Philosophy from the Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina. The title of her project is Humiliation and Human Strength: Stories of African-Spanish Migrations.
   
RWAMATWARA EGIDE
Rwamatwara Egide is a Sociologist and Anthropologist and Doctoral Student in Sociology, University of Zimbabwe, Harare, Africa. The title of his project is Frustration, Humiliation and Psycho-Social Suffering of Rwandan Refugees in Africa and Europe.
   
MARÍA LAURA SALAFIA
María Laura Salafia, Political Science. The title of her project is Humiliation Policies Applied to Persecuted Individuals, Detainees and Refugees During the Period 1975/1983 in Rosario, Argentina.
   
LAURA SCHILDT
Laura Schildt, MA, Center for Justice and Peacebuilding, Eastern Mennonite University, EMU, Virginia, USA, is fluent in Spanish and English, and has experience in community development, Mexico. The title of her project is Humiliation and Human Strength: Stories of African-Spanish Migrations.
   
NANCY GOOD SIDER
Nancy Good Sider, Ph.D., Project Consultant, Graduate Faculty, Conflict Transformation, Eastern Mennonite University, EMU, Virginia, USA. The title of her project is Humiliation and Human Strength: Stories of African-Spanish Migrations.
   
ESPEN SIVERTSEN
Espen Sivertsen (Denmark) is currently studying project management and new business design as a "Chaos Pilot" in Århus, Denmark. He has graduated from Manchester University with an Upper Second in Psychology and has worked as a research assistant for Dr. Sirois in Manchester. The title of his project is An Existential Discourse Analysis of Humiliation as Reported by Iraqi Refugees in the UK and Denmark.
Although his academic experiences lie more within the field of visual navigation, sensory integration, and group processes, he has a wide variety of interests, including refugees, social interaction, self-organising systems, open source communities (particularly Wiki Wiki's), the theory-action gap, the effects of technology on everyday life, and non-verbal communication.
Espen was the youngest residential tutor in the history of Manchester University during 2002-2004, looking after the well-being of 48 first year students. He was also elected faculty representative to the policy, planning and resource committee in 2002, representing some 3500 students.
He also likes to travel, and has among other things: been a Buddhist monk in Cambodia; spent part of his 2003 summer biking solo from Tallinn in Estonia to St Petersburg in Russia; and - after winning the "NORWAY 2032" prize for a vision of sustainable development awarded by the (then) Norwegian Minister of Environment, Minister Børge Brende - spent a summer in South Africa attending the UN World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg. Here Espen helped The Norwegian Forum for Environment and Development as an assistant coordinator.
At the moment, Espen is a member of the winter bathing club in Århus, and practices Taji Chuan and Kung Fu.
   
TSEMPZANG SIMPLICE MIAFO
Tsempzang Simplice Miafo (Cameroon/Switzerland) is currently finishing the equivalence of the Licence of Psychology at the University of Geneva, Switzerland. The title of his project is Refugees' Psychological Functioning in Cameroon. The Case of Chadian or Central African Adults of Yaoundé.
   

TZVETELINA TZONEVA
Tzvetelina Tzoneva (Bulgaria/Switzerland), is currently a doctoral student, Candidate to Ph.D. in Education from University of Geneva, Switzerland, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences. Her doctoral thesis is entitled The Image of the "Other" in the Textbooks of National history: Compatibility and Incompatibility in Relationships between Christian and Muslims in Bulgaria (1878-1989). The title of her project is Dignity-Humiliation in the Case of Internally Displaced Persons in Latin America: The Examples of Colombia, Guatemala, Peru and Mexico.
Tzvetelina Tzoneva has graduated from Sofia University in Cultural Studies. She has also specialized in political philosophy. After a first research on the question of the human condition in the work of Hannah Arendt and Simone Weil, she continued with the researches on the memory and the construction of identity. She has also been interested in the visual as an instrument of propaganda and as a means of manipulation. Her Master's dissertation constituted a Critical Analysis on Methods of Text Introduction in the Ethnographic Films: Cinema-vérité or the New Participatory Cinema. Between 1998 and 2001, she took courses on contemporary history, history of arts and photography and French studies in Geneva. She became passionate about the conceptual art, the documentary and ethnographic cinema. In 2003 she continued her vocational training with a Master in Educational Sciences. Her principal interests involve visual anthropology, cross-cultural psychology, history of education, the construction of the collective memory, assimilation, social inequalities, human rights and the right to education.

 

 

DELIA NATALIA URQUIZA
Delia Natalia Urquiza focuses on Museum Conservation and Social Work. The title of her project is Humiliation Policies Applied to Persecuted Individuals, Detainees and Refugees During the Period 1975/1983 in Rosario, Argentina.
   
MARCELA VALDATA
Marcela Valdata (Argentina) is currently working on her Ph.D. at the Museo de la Memoria [Museum of Memory] in Rosario, Argentina. The title of her project is Humiliation Policies Applied to Persecuted Individuals, Detainees and Refugees During the Period 1975/1983 in Rosario, Argentina. Please see Humiliation Policies Applied to Individuals, Detainees and Refugees During the Period 1975/1983 in Rosario, Argentina: Brief Historical and Political Development of the 20th Century, paper presented at the 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 15-16, 2005.
   
JUAN MANUEL WALMAGGIA
Juan Manuel Walmaggia, Anthropology. The title of his project is Humiliation Policies Applied to Persecuted Individuals, Detainees and Refugees During the Period 1975/1983 in Rosario, Argentina.
   

G. GLADSTON XAVIER
Gladston Xavier (India) is a Fulbright Fellow who studied conflict transformation. He presently lectures in Loyola College affiliated to the University of Madras. He works among the refugees, people living with HIV/AIDS and the dalits in India. He has been trained in Street theater, Playback theater and theater of the oppressed. He also gives theater workshop for different groups. He is presently pursuing his Ph.D. I Social Work on the peace process in Sri Lanka. The title of his project is A Qualitative Study on the Sri Lankan Tamil Refugees Living in Camps in Tamil Nadu on the Humiliation that they Face.
Please see also:
Florina Benoit & Joseph Xavier (2006),The Life of Sri Lankan Refugees A Paradigm Shift, abstract presented at the Second International Conference on Multicultural Discourses, 13-15th April 2007, Institute of Discourse and Cultural Studies, & Department of Applied Psychology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, as part of the 9th Annual Meeting of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.

 


Terrorism and Humiliation Project (alphabetical)

NOOR AKBAR
Noor Akbar is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Coordinating Team, of the HumanDHS Global Core Team, and of the HumanDHS Education Team.
He is a native of Pakistan's North West Frontier Province (NWFP) and has earlier worked as a free lance journalist. He has a Master's degree in Journalism & Mass Communication from the University of Peshawar and is presently doing his Master's degree in Political Science from the same university. The title of his project is Terrorism and Humiliation: To Show Empirically that Humiliation Is one of the Root Causes of Terrorism.
Noor has conducted a research thesis on the topic of Osama Bin Laden and Pakistani Press- a Portrayal Study of Daily Dawn and Daily Mashriq. (The study was an analysis of the two national daylies, one Urdu and English, after the 9/11 scenario.) Besides, Noor Akbar also worked as a Research Associate in a research study on the Pukhtoon Jirga (an indigenous institution for conflict transformation and peace building in the Pukhtoon belt of Pakistan and Afghanistan). This one and a half year study is awarded by United States Institute for Peace (USIP).
Noor has recently conducted, as co-facilitator, a series of trainings in non-violent communication, conflict transformation, and coexistence to the UNHCR Staff, implementing partners and government officials at Jalalabad, Afghanistan.
He has also been awarded a scholarship by the Center for Non-Violent Communication to participating in a fifteen days (19th to 4th July 2005) Special Summer Session with Marshal Rosenberg, at Orchidea Lodge, Switzerland.
Presently he is working as Communication Officer, at Just Peace International Inc, a nonpolitical, nonreligious, nonprofit, civil society initiative, that aims to work for JUSTICE & PEACE through conflict transformation methods in order to protect and promote constructive peace by assisting, advocating and empowering grass roots communities, organizations, governments and the civil society to enable them to allow judicious, sustainable and productive interaction to realize maximum human potential in an environment of peace, justice and dignity.
Please see here:
•  Honor Killing in Pakistan: The Case of 5 Women Buried Alive, Gothenburg, Sweden: University of Gothenburg Sweden, Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 2010
•  How should we define genocide?, London: University of Roehampton, Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 2010
• Women Rights in FATA Pakistan: A Critical Review of NGOs' Communication Strategies for Projects’ Implementation
SOA-3902. A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment for the degree: Master in Human Rights Practice Department of Social Anthropology, University of Tromsø School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg School of Business and Social Sciences, Roehampton University 28th May 2010
   
JESSICA LOS BAÑOS
Jessica Los Baños (Philippines) is an Attorney and holds a Bachelor of Laws (LLB) from the University of the Philippines and a Masters of Business (MBA) from the Monash University, Australia. The title of her project is The Effects of Humiliation on the Economic, Socio-cultural Rights and Access to Justice of Muslim Women in Mindanao.
Jessica Los Baños is Assistant Professor of Human Resource Management and General Management at the University of the Philippines. She is also a business and trade lawyer and advises clients on corporate, competition and property laws. She is a co-founder of Business & Trade Legal Information Services, Inc., a legal resource center on Philippine business and trade and has co-authored two chapters of books on the Nonprofit Law in the Philippines.
   
IMELDA DEINLA
Imelda Deinla (Philippines) is an Attorney and holds a Bachelor of Laws (LLB) from the University of the Philippines and a Masters of Law (LLM) in International Law from the University of New South Wales, Australia. The title of her project is The Effects of Humiliation on the Economic, Socio-cultural Rights and Access to Justice of Muslim Women in Mindanao.
Imelda advises clients on corporation and property laws and settlement of estate and handles cases involving violence against women. She is a freelance researcher and writer on such topics as international trade law, commercial arbitration and women's human rights. She has articles for the World Bulletin of the UP Institute of International Legal Studies on confidentiality in international commercial arbitration and the SPS Regime under the WTO and EU Law. She is a volunteer lawyer for the Women Lawyer's Network (Lawnet) and a resource person for the Women's Legal Bureau, Inc. She is currently doing a research study on incest cases in the Philippines and serves as Project Consultant on a dialogue between Muslim and Christian Women Lawyers in the Philippines. She is also an environmental advocate and underwent a training course on environmental law under the auspices of the UP-IILS and IUCN (World Conservation Union). She is a co-founder of Business & Trade Legal Information Services, Inc., a legal resource center on Philippine business and trade.
   
MITCH ELLIOTT
Mitch Elliott, Ph.D., is a Psychoanalyst working in Dublin and Belfast and the Director of the Irish Institute for Psycho-Social Studies. The title of his project is Damaged Bonds: A Study in the Social Psychodynamics of Conflicted Group Identities.
Please see here some of his publications:
•  Mennell, Stephen, Paul A. Stokes, Mitch Elliott, Kenneth Bishop, and Ellen O'Malley Dunlop. [forthcoming]. Habitus and Identification: Stasis and Change in Intergroup Relations in Ireland.
• Stokes, Paul A., Mitch Elliott, and Kenneth Bishop. 2004. "Societal PTSD? Historic Shock in Northern Ireland." Psychotherapy and Politics International 2:1-16.
• Mennell, Stephen, Mitchell Elliott, Paul A. Stokes, Aoife Rickard, and Ellen O'Malley Dunlop. 2000. "Protestants in a Catholic State - A Silent Minority in Ireland." Pp. 69-92 in Religion and Politics: East-West Contrasts from Contemporary Europe, edited by Tom Inglis, Zdzislaw Mach, and Rafal Mazanek. Dublin: University College Dublin Press.
• Stokes, Paul A., Mitch Elliott, Stephen Mennell, and Kenneth Bishop. 1999. "The Decomissioning Impasse." International Minds 9:10-13.
   

CORINNA CARMEN GAYER
Corinna Carmen Gayer is also a Member of the HumanDHS Education Team.
Corinna is a PhD-student in peace- and conflict studies at the Freie Universität in Berlin. She finished her masters thesis entitled Of Irreconcilable Nature? Biodiversity Conservation and Indigenous Peoples' Rights in Brazil at the Department for Social Sciences at the Humboldt-University in Berlin. Throughout her studies, Corinna studied at the University of Salamanca in Spain and at the University of Belo Horizonte in Brazil. For more than two years she worked in international cooperation projects in Guatemala and Brazil and also had the opportunity to visit regional development projects in North-West Africa. During her last stay in Brazil she got acquainted with the conflict of different cultural groups over a specific territory, which brought up her present interest in conflicts and possible peace-building processes.
Corinna is currently based in Jerusalem in order to carry out her research project about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
   
HANS OLA HAAVELSRUD
Hans Ola Haavelsrud (Norway/UK) is currently about to complete a master's degree in moral philosophy and public policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science where he has been a student for the past four years. Before attending university in England Hans Ola lived in France for three years, where he completed the French baccalaureate at Lycee Pierre Corneille in Rouen. Areas of interest within his postgraduate degree include moral responsibility and questions of global justice. In 2003 Hans Ola did a summer internship in Argentina with an international NGO and became interested in the history and societies of southern Latin American states such as Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil. The title of his project is Terrorism and Humiliation in Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Uruguay.
   

SYED ABRAR HUSSAIN
Syed Abrar Hussain (Pakistan/USA) is a Fulbright Scholar & MA Student at the Conflict Transformation Program, Eastern Mennonite University, EMU, Virginia, USA. The title of his project is Humiliation and Terrorism: A Case Study of How the Feelings of Humiliation and Hopelessness are Turning the Students in the Religious Madrasas (Seminaries) of Pakistan into Potential Terrorists.
Abrar is a civil service officer in Pakistan. Most recently, before coming to the US, he was working in the National Police Bureau, Government of Pakistan, on issues and themes related to police reforms, combating international terrorism, religious extremism, sectarianism and the relevance of these issues with the law and order situation in Pakistan. He also liaised with different international agencies like the Asian Development Bank, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), US Department of Justice etc. on projects related to capacity building and training of police forces of Pakistan on terrorism-related issues.

 

 


VEGAR JORDANGER
Vegar Jordanger is Doctorate Student at the Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, and a peace researcher and practitioner. The title of his project is Humiliation, Violence, and Terror in War-Torn Chechnya and North Caucasus.
The last 15 years he has been living, studying and working in Angola, France, Russia, and Norway. Some of his key peace research interests includes: the role of magical and mythical operators in contemporary religio-political rhetoric and persuasion, identity dynamics and the role of emotions in dialogue processes, and music and art in conflict transformation. Vegar Jordanger is also the director of Building Peaces, a peace-NGO working to support and encourage local capacities for peace. Building Peaces is a network of researchers and peace practitioners working on dialogical leadership development and civil-society strengthening projects. A main strategy in Building Peaces’ work is to develop local peace-building capacity by working closely together with local partners. This involves jointly implementing projects with local groups in the fields of non-violent conflict transformation, human rights, peace education, dialogue and reconciliation. Building Peaces’ main long-term project is the North-Caucasian Dialogue Project which comprises a core group of young Chechen/North Ossetian/Russian civil society/business leaders and resource persons working together on a range of dialogue and peace-building projects.
Please see:
• The collective volume Music and Conflict Transformation: Harmonies and Dissonances in Geopolitics edited by Olivier Urbain in 2008 by I. B. Tauris, in collaboration with the Toda Institute for Global Peace and Policy Research. There is also a online journal, Music and Arts in Action, and one of the largest conferences on music and conflict transformation took place in Exeter, UK in 2011. Jean-Paul Lederach is one of the practitioners/researchers who have made interesting contributions to this field already. His two latest books focus on how how the arts can be used in reconciliation (and other forms of conflict work.
• Music Journeys As a Tool for Dialogue and Track Two Diplomacy (2014, in Arabic).
Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, www.humiliationstudies.org/publications/publications.php#jordanger.
The English version "Healing Cultural Violence - Collective Vulnerability through Guided Imagery with Music," was published in Music and Conflict Transformation - Harmonies and Dissonances in Geopolitics, edited by Olivier Urbain, 2008.
   

OLOWOYEYE ABIODUN
Anthony Abiodun Olowoyeye (UK/Nigeria) is currently pursuing his Ph.D. research programme at the London School of Management and Technology in Stratford, UK. His area of interest is international peace and security.
In 1995, he received his B.SC degree in Political Science from Ondo State University, Nigeria, where he came out top of his class with a second class upper division.
Furthermore, he proceeded to the University of Lagos, Nigeria, where he bagged his M.SC degree in Political Science in 1999. The title of his project is Africa, a Trigger in the Explosion of International Terrorism: A Critical Analysis of The "Apparatus" of Terrorism and its Causes.
Anthony Abiodun Olowoyeye started his career with an AB organisation where he worked as a Community Development Officer for an NGO, as a Field Coordinator for the organisation. As a Community Development Officer, he raised awareness among the locals for the need to protect the environment through sustainable farming and fishing methods. Anthony successfully designed and implemented local educational systems designed especially for those in the rural areas to educate them about the ozone layer depletion. He has helped implement local AGENDA 21 in these rural areas. All these were aimed at helping reduce global warming. He also played a prominent role in conflict resolution in the rural areas especially "resource influenced" conflicts.
From there, he proceeded to work with the Quefihmad Group. He joined as a Senior Administrative Staff and as a result of his innovative business development, rose to become the group's Admin/Operations Manager. Among his many achievements were his introduction of the small scale business scheme and the development of a business early warning alarming system to guide the group's operation. This was derived from the A-WACS (Air Warning and Alarming System) defence plane. This was to serve as an early warning system and "circuit breaker" to losses on business investments.
As a researcher, his areas of interests include the African debt crisis, the environment and international peace and security. Among his past unpublished works are "The Impact of the Debt Crisis on Underdeveloped Economies: A Case Study of Nigeria," "External Debt Management and Underdeveloped Countries: An Analytical Study of Nigeria," "Debt and Military," "Debt and Democracy," "The Impact of Oil Spill on the Local Communities Living in the Niger Delta," and "Debt and Environmental Degradation." He is presently working on other papers.
He enjoys playing basketball. He is currently engaged to Tola Owoeye, a chartered accountant.

 

 

JELEN PACLARIN
Jelen Paclarin (Philippines) is a Senior Lecturer at the Miriam College, and a Feminist & Developmental Worker. The title of her project is The Effects of Humiliation on the Economic, Socio-cultural Rights and Access to Justice of Muslim Women in Mindanao.
   
SUSMITA THUKRAL
Susmita Thukral is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Core Team and the HumanDHS Education Team.
Susmita is from New Delhi, India. She has a Masters in Psychology and Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. Susmita has extensive research experience and has worked on an interdisciplinary research project on the lives of individuals who witnessed the partition of India and the violence that it entailed.
Her scholarly interests include genocide, war trauma and terrorism. She wishes to actively work in the area of trauma studies in a way that allows her to combine her psychodynamic orientation and socio-political interests.The title of her project is Why Do People Join Terrorist Organizations?