33rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies
A 'Caravan' conference titled 'Cultivating Good Living Amazon: Nurturing Solidarity with Mother Earth'

Amazonia, Brasil
28th August – 3rd September 2019 in Marabá, the Amazonian State of Pará
3rd – 7th September 2019 in Belém, capital of the Amazonian State of Pará
This conference took place in the midst of an emergency situation – the Amazon Rainforest on fire
An international WhatsApp group was created for the conference on 12th August 2019

Legal Amazon is a region formed by the states Acre, Amapá, Pará, Amazonas, Rondônia, Roraima and part of the states of Maranhã, Tocantins, and Mato Grosso






Photo gallery


The Amazonian State of Pará on the left side, with Marabá and Belém on the right side, in relation to Recife and Brasilia

Our 33rd Annual HumanDHS Dignity Conference in Brasil was unlike any other we had before! The conference took place at the time when the Amazon had just been set on fire (starting for full on 10th August 2019) and everyone was in a state of anxiety, alarm, and emergency. Because of the environmental emergency, the conference didn't take place in a fixed location. Instead it unfolded as a 'caravan conference', where the conveners went to the participants to engage in dignity dialogues. This mobile methodology allowed our efforts to be responsive to the conditions on the ground, sometimes changing course from minute to minute. Thus it became a fluid conference, like a river that always finds its way. We began our conference on 28th August 2019 in Marabá, the 'gate to the industrialisation of the Amazon', and we concluded it in Belém, a place of immense cultural diversity, visionary history, and indigenous roots, on 7th September.
Not only the forest had been set on fire, also important institution were being set 'on fire' while we had our conference, albeit in a different way, such as the federal university of the city of Marabá that was scheduled to close down due to funding being cut. In this dire situation, we attempted to be as supportive as possible and carry out a caravan of dialogues in as dignified and dignifying ways as possible.
We had the great privilege of learning from the true experts of sustainable dignifying life, namely, those who know how to live with the rainforest, rather than against it — we admired the knowledge of a fishing community and a gardening community. We also had the privilege of speaking at the City Council of Marabá, we went to schools and the university (as it was still open for the last days). In Belém, we were honoured by being invited into the Legislative Assembly of the State of Pará on World Amazon Day on 5th September.
. The main local conveners in Marabá were Dan Baron and Manoela Souza, who reside in Marabá, and Gabriela Saab from São Paulo, who was also the host of the WhatsApp group for the conference. In Belém, our local convener was Sandro Ruggeri. Evelin Lindner came from outside of Brasil.

This region of the Brazilian Amazon has the greatest biodiversity and concentration of iron ore and drinking water in the world. But it also has the world’s highest statistic for murdered activists and contains the most violent cities (genocide of black youth and extreme abuse of women), with the worst high school education in Brasil (Dan Baron, 10th January 2018).

Please see our Dignity Letter with notes from the Amazon sent out after this conference on October 10, 2019.
See also Newsletter 33, written after this conference – you are warmly invited to contribute to it! (Please send your comments to us so that we can include them in the newsletter.)

If you wish to participate in our conferences, please email us! Please know that you are invited to spend the entire conference with us, so that true dignity-family-building can emerge! All our events are part of an ongoing effort to nurture a global dignity community.
You are invited to fill out our Appreciative Introduction form, print it out, and bring it with you.
There is no registration fee, we usually share minimal cost according to ability at the end.


In 2012, the AfroRaiz Collective of Cabelo Seco, Marabá, Pará State, sang 'Amazon, Our Land' (picture in the middle).
Since 10th August 2019, their land is on fire (photos from Alter do Chão, Pará State, 16th September 2019).
See Rios de Encontro: Towards a Good Living Amazon (Flying River Tour)

The conference had two parts, the first in Marabá, the second in Belém
See the invitation letter, in English and Portuguese
See the original programme (en | pt)
(The programme had to be changed from minute to minute, due to the crisis situation, also the dates changed – see the final outcome further down)

1. Caravan of Dignity Dialogues in Marabá
Wednesday, 28th August – Monday, 3rd September
Marabá is the 'gate to the Amazon'
See Rios de Encontro: Towards a Good Living Amazon (Flying River Tour)

2. Caravan of Dignity Dialogues in Belém
Tuesday, 3rd September – Thursday, 7th September
Belém is the capital and largest city of Pará State in the north of Brasil
Iit is the ideal place for the immersion into its diverse culture and indigenous ways of living

Pre- and Post-Conference Excursions for Those Interested
• For the adventurous: It is possible to go by boat from Belém to Manaus and continue on the Amazonas River from there
• Visit the Castanheiras of Eldorado dos Carajás monument
Monument

Local Hosts, Conveners, and Coordinators

baron

Manoela Souza and Dan Baron
Directors of the Transformance Institute: Culture & Education
and its AfroRaiz Youth Collective of the 'Rios de Encontro' (Rivers of Meeting) project in the Community University of the Rivers in Marabá, Pará, Brasil
See Rios de Encontro: Towards a Good Living Amazon (Flying River Tour)


Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet
Directeur général at Humana Comunicação & Tradução, and Director at HUMANA COM & TRAD
See Instituto Humana, Belém, Pará, Brasil


Gabriela Rodrigues Saab Riva
Human Rights Law and Environmental Law (USP)
Specialist in the Right to Water as a Human Right, Researcher of HumanDHS, São Paulo, Brasil
Also host of the WhatsApp Group for the conference

in cooperation with
Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS),
and the World Dignity University initiative

Good Living Amazon is an alternative paradigm project. It is seeded in the small Afro-Indigenous community of Cabelo Seco, the first settlement of Marabá City, between the threatened Itacaiúnas and Tocantins rivers, in Pará State. It is coordinated by the Transformance Institute, who hosted the first part of our conference in the Community University of the Rivers. Please visit this interview for background on the Rivers of Meeting project and the community, and watch 'Rios de Encontro: Towards a Good Living Amazon (Flying River Tour)'.
Dan Baron invites you, if you wish, into a partnership/collaboration with the virtual Networks of Creativity. You are invited to contribute with small videos. He sends us these poems as his welcome:
Good Living
Let Our River Pass
Letter from Mariana

Rios de Encontro (Rivers of Meeting)

The Transformance Institute: Culture & Education and its AfroRaiz Youth Collective in the Community University of the Rivers

Redes de Criatividade rumo à II Fórum Bem Viver

ENCONTRO ABRA 2018: Idealização da metodologia e cronograma do Redes de Criatividade, como contribuição ao Fórum Mundial Alternativo de Água (FAMA)

• If you wish to participate in our conferences, please send us an email. Please know that you are invited to spend the entire conference with us, so that true dignity-family-building can emerge! All of our events are part of an ongoing effort to nurture a global dignity community.

• Thank you for emailing your message and introductory information to conferences@humiliationstudies.org. Please kindly include your contact information and any other details you would like to share with our community (such as CV, papers, articles, presentations, video links, etc.).

• There is no registration fee for our conferences. To cover our expenses, we usually summarise the costs during the conference and invite participants to contribute according to their ability. This collaborative approach to financing allows us to keep the conference affordable for all.

• You are invited to fill out our Appreciative Introduction form (Word/PDF), print it out, and bring it with you.

• We gratefully count on you to obtain your own tourist visum and make your own transportation and accommodation arrangements. Please see options further down.

• Please see our general invitation for this conference sent out on 24th June 2019, and a personal invitation letter in English and in Brazilian Portuguese.

• Please see here the programme of the conference as it was conceived prior to the conference, in English and in Brazilian Portuguese. Due to the crisis situation, the programme had to be changed sometimes from minute to minute.

• Please see our Dignity Letter with notes from the Amazon sent out after this conference on October 10, 2019.

• Have a look at all our previous conferences and see also the Newsletters written after our past conferences. Please see Newsletter 33, written after this conference - you are warmly invited to contribute to it! (Please send your comments to us so that we can include them in the newsletter.)

 


 

Contents

•  Frame
•  List of Conveners
•  Programme:

•  Part 1 in Marabá
28th August | 29th August | 30th August | 31st August | 1st September | 2nd September | 3rd September

•  Part 2 in Belém
3rd September | 4th September | 5th September | 6th September | 7th September

•  Post-conference
•  Pictures and videos overview

•  List of Participants
•  Papers
•  Practical Details
•  Background Material
•  What happened in our previous meetings? Please see Newsletters!
•  Previous Reflections on the Format of the Conference

•  Pictures and videos overview

Still pictures:
We thank Dan Baron, Gaby Saab, and Evelin Lindner for sharing their photos with us!

Day One, 28th August 2019
• Please click here to see the pictures of the visit to the Câmara Municipal de Marabá, Prefeitura de Marabá, the City Hall of Marabá or the Marabá City Council
• Please click here to see the pictures of the end of the day in a restaurant overlooking the river Tocantins in Marabá

Day Two, 28th August 2019
• Please click here to see the welcome from the AfroRaiz Collective of young artists
• Please click here to see the Escola Irmã Theodora, a public school in Marabá
• Please click here to see the dialogue session at the Federal University of Southern and Southeastern Pará (UNIFESSPA) with students and teachers of the Law of the Land

Day Three, 30th August 2019
• Please click here to see photos of the interview in Radio Correio 92.1 with Dan Baron, Evelin Lindner, and Gabriela Saab
• Please click here to see evening photos at the House of Rivers in Cabelo Seco
• Please click here to see photos of the Circle of Love Gifts (see also a little video)

Day Four, 31st August 2019
• Please click here to see all 38 photos of our journey to the fishing community on the island Praia Alta in the Tocantins river
• Please click here to see all 90 photos in Vila Praia Alta
• Please click here to see all 33 photos in Tauiry

Day Five, 1st September 2019
• Please click here to see all 39 photos of our journey to the Assentamento (Settlement) de Nova Ipixuna
• Please click here to see all 18 photos of the recording session
• Please click here to see all 29 photos of our time in Nova Ipixuna
• Please click here to see all 42 photos of our way back from Nova Ipixuna to Marabá

Day Six, 2nd September 2019
• Please click here to see all 14 photos of this day in Marabá

Day Seven, 3rd September 2019
• Please click here to see all 57 photos of the flight from Marabá to Belém
• Please click here to see all photos of the little shop in the airport of Belém that gave a good overview over the riches of the Amazon
• Please click here to see all 10 photos of our first meeting in the Belém part of our conference

Day Eight, 4th September 2019
• Please click here to see all 20 photos of our visit to the Federal University of Pará (UFPA)
• Please click here to see all 95 photos of our journey to the Instituto Humana on Mosqueiro Island
• Please click here to see all 7 photos of the organic farm that Sandro brought us to
• Please click here to see all 29 photos of our conference at the Instituto Humana of Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet, see Evelin Lindner's contribution Encontre e conecte! Please Meet and Connect!, and Kamolrat Intaratat's contribution (recorded on 7th September)
• Please click here to see all 12 photos offered to us by Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet to introduce his Instituto Humana to us, see the wonderful film that Sandro created about his work

Day Nine, 5th September 2019
• Please click here to see all 8 photos of the Recanto da Preguiça / Lazy Sloth Corner
• Please click here to see all 4 photos of the way to Belém
• Please click here to see all 3 photos of the breakfast of Belém
• Please click here to see all 13 photos of the streets in Belém
• Please click here to see all 25 photos of the Museu Goeldi
• Please click here to see all 12 photos of the Kayapo exhibition
• Please click here to see all photos of the interview with Marlucia Martins
• Please click here to see all 13 photos of the Resto do Parque
• Please click here to see all 17 photos of the way to the Palaco Capanagem
• Please click here to see all 13 photos of the event with Deputado Dirceu Ten Caten
• Please click here to see all 5 photos of the centre of Belém

Day Ten, 6th September 2019
• Please click here to see all 93 photos of the boat journey from Belém to the island of Combú
• Please click here to see all 21 photos of the chocolate atelier on the island of Combú
• Please click here to see all 38 photos of the Saldosa Maloca restaurant on the island of Combú
• Please click here to see all 10 photos of the 'Street River' graffiti project on the island of Combú

Post-conference 8th – 10th September
• Please click here to see all 18 photos of the Praça da República in Belém on 8th September
• Please click here to see all 42 photos of the Ver-o-peso market in Belém on 9th September
• Please click here to see all 10 photos of the ubiquitous 'cable salad' also in Belém (3rd – 9th September 2019)
• Please click here to see all 38 photos of the flight from Belém to São Paulo on 10th September

Videos:
Thank you so much, dear Gaby Saab, Evelin Lindner, and many others, for creating many important video-recordings!
See a summary of the videos on the video page.

Pre-conference preparations:
01 Rios de Encontro: Towards a Good Living Amazon (Flying River Tour)
02 Gaby Saab Welcomes Everyone to the Dignity Conference WhatsApp Group, 23rd August 2019
03 Michael Boyer Introduces the Dignity Greeting, 23rd August 2019

Day One, 28th August 2019
04 The members of the Rivers of Encounter Project were welcomed by the City Hall of Marabá, Pará, Amazon, Brasil. This is the relevant section edited out by Evelin Lindner from the video of the entire session that was recorded by the City Hall and posted on their Facebook page
05 Evelin Lindner's Message to the City Council of Marabá in the Amazonian State of Pará, Brasil (recorded on her own camera)

Day Two, 29th August 2019
06 Johan Galtung and Antonio Carlos da Silva Rosa on Skype

Day Three, 30th August 2019
07.0 Interview with Dan Baron, Gaby Saab, and Evelin Lindner in Radio Correio 92.1 in Marabá
07 Circle of Love Gifts

Day Four, 31st August 2019
08 The Babaçu Palm and Its Beetle Larva Gongo in Vila Praia Alta on Ilha do Praia Alta in the river Tocantins near Marabá in the Amazonian State of Pará, Brasil
09 Tapioca in Vila Praia Alta
10 Urucum in Vila Praia Alta
11 The World Dignity University Initiative in Vila Praia Alta
12 Manoel de Deus Gomes da Silva in Vila Praia Alta
13 Leaving Praia Alta island by boat and at the end of the day back to Marabá by car
14 Rafael Cabral in Tauiry
15 Cristiane (Cris) Vieira da Cunha in Tauiry
16 Ronaldo Macena do Tauiry in Tauiry

Day Five, 1st September 2019
17 The cross for Claudio and Maria
18 Evandra Vilacoert on fire containment
19 How Evandra Vilacoerts fire brigade contained fires
20 Michelliny Bentes on sustainable technologies to traditional communities
21 Daniel Mangas on sustainable technologies to traditional communities
22 Daniel Santiago Pereira and Anderson Schwamke on sustainable honey production
23 Chicken life in the Amazon
23.1 Claudelice dos Santos and Her Forest School Project

Day Eight, 4th September 2019
24 Instituto Humana, film by Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet
25 Encontre e conecte! Please Meet and Connect! Evelin Lindner's Contribution
26/40 Kamolrat Intaratat's contribution (recorded on 7th September)

Day Nine, 5th September 2019
27 The Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi in Belém
28 The Kayapo people presented in the Museu Goeldi
29 The Amazon Day conference at the Museu Goeldi: Ima Celia Guimaraes Vieira
30 The Amazon Day conference at the Museu Goeldi: Marlucia Bonifácio Martins
31 The Amazon Day conference at the Museu Goeldi: Denny Moore
32 The Amazon Day conference at the Museu Goeldi: Closing dialogues
33 Interview with Marlucia Martins on the Amazon Day 2019
34 The Amazon Day at the Parliament of Pará State in Belém: Deputado Dirceu Ten Caten invited Evelin Lindner

Day Ten, 6th September 2019
35 On the way to Combú island
36 Flavia of the Saldosa Maloca restaurant on Combú island
37 Aline Voos on Combú island explaining Andiroba
38 Evelin Lindner on Combú island
39 Vitor Nascimento explains the 'Street River' graffiti project

Day Eleven, 7th September 2019
26/40 Kamolrat Intaratat and her Research Center of Communication and Development Knowledge Management

Post-conference 8th – 10th September
41 Praça da República in Belém, 8th September 2019
42 Mercado Ver-o-peso in Belém, 9th September 2019 (see also Roteiro Geo-Turístico da UFPA - Ver-o-Peso / Centro Histórico - 9th November 2019)

43 A summary of Evelin Lindner's impressions during the conference, 10th October 2019

44 O canto de jovens ribeirinhos em defesa do Pedral do Lourenção (Pará), 16 de outubro de 2019



 

Frame

by Linda Hartling, 2004

In our meetings we aim at creating a humiliation-free, collaborative learning environment characterised by mutual respect, mutual empathy, and openness to difference. The perspective of 'appreciative enquiry' is a useful frame of our work. Our HumanDHS efforts are not just about the work we do together, but also about HOW WE WORK TOGETHER. At appropriate points during our meetings, for example at the end of each day, we take a moment to reflect on the practices observed that contributed to an appreciative/humiliation-free learning experience.

It is important to emphasise that an appreciative approach is not about expecting people to agree. In fact, differences of opinion enrich the conversation and deepen people's understanding of ideas. Perhaps, this could be conceptualised as 'waging good conflict' (Jean Baker Miller), which means practicing radical respect for differences and being open to a variety of perspectives and engaging others without contempt or rankism. As we have seen in many fields, contempt and rankism drain energy away from the important work that needs to be done. Most people only know 'conflict' as a form of war within a win/lose frame. 'Waging good conflict', on the other side, is about being empathic and respectful, making room for authenticity, creating clarity, and growth.
Please see:
An Appreciative Frame: Beginning a Dialogue on Human Dignity and Humiliation, written by Linda in 2005
Appreciative Facilitation: Hints for Round Table Moderators, kindly written in February 2006 by Judith Thompson to support the moderators of our workshops.
Buddhist Teachings on Right Speech, which relate to our quest for appreciative enquiry, caring and being.
•  Please see also these videos on our Appreciative Frame, created by Linda Hartling:
- Appreciative Enquiry 1, a video that was recorded on October 30, 2011, in Portland, Oregon, USA, by Evelin Lindner, for the World Dignity University initiative.
- Appreciative Enquiry 2, a video that was uploaded onto YouTube on August 11, 2012, in preparation of the 19th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 27th-30th August 2012, in Oslo, Norway.
- Our Appreciative Frame 3, a video created in December 2014 (see also Pdf), for the 2014 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 4–5, 2014.
- Appreciative Enquiry 4, a video that was recorded on May 27, 2015, in Portland, Oregon, USA, by Linda Hartling, for the 25th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, in Kigali, Rwanda, 2nd - 5th June 2015.
- Appreciative Frame, by Linda Hartling on December 8, 2016, at the 2016 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 8 – 9, 2016.
•  Dignilogue Tips and Dynamic Dignilogue List, created by Linda Hartling on October 10, 2015, for the 2015 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 3 – 4, 2015.

 



List of Conveners

 

Evelin Gerda Lindner, Medical Doctor, Clinical and Social Psychologist, Ph.D. (Dr. med.), Ph.D. (Dr. psychol.), Organiser of the HumanDHS Conferences, Supporting the Local Conveners

See the videos made in Brasil when Evelin spent time there in June 2012. See also See also still pictures. Evelin Lindner's 2012 Digniventure reflections.

Evelin Gerda Lindner is the Founding President of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network and initiator of the World Dignity University initiative. She is a transdisciplinary social scientist and humanist who holds two Ph.D.s, one in medicine and one in psychology. In 1996, she designed a research project on the concept of humiliation and its role in genocide and war. German history served as starting point. She is the recipient of the 2006 SBAP Award, the 2009 "Prisoner’s Testament" Peace Award, the 2014 HumanDHS Lifetime Award, and she has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2015, 2016, and 2017. She is affiliated with the University of Oslo, Norway, with its Centre for Gender Research, and with its Department of Psychology (folk.uio.no/evelinl/), furthermore, with the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN), which was superseded, in 2009, by the Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict, and Complexity (AC4) at Columbia University, New York. She is also affiliated with the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme in Paris. Lindner is teaching globally, including in South East Asia, the Middle East, Australia, Africa, and other places globally. [read more]
Please see:
Interview with Evelin Lindner - Challenges of our Time; Learning to Connect, December 8, 2016
Mini-Documentary of the Annual Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict "The Globalization of Dignity," December 8 - 9, 2016

 



Linda Hartling, Ph.D., Social Psychologist, Organiser of the HumanDHS Conferences, Supporting the Local Conveners

Dr. Linda M. Hartling is the Director of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS). She is also a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, HumanDHS Global Core Team, HumanDHS Global Coordinating Team, HumanDHS Research Team, and HumanDHS Education Team. She is the Editor of the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (JHDHS).
Hartling is affiliated with the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) at the Stone Center, which is part of the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College in Massachusetts. Until November 2008, she was its Associate Director. Hartling is a member of the JBMTI theory-building group advancing the practice of the Relational-Cultural Theory, which is a new model of psychological development. In addition, Hartling coordinates and contributes to training programs, publications, and special projects for the JBMTI. She holds a doctoral degree in clinical/community psychology and has published papers on resilience, substance abuse prevention, shame and humiliation, relational practice in the workplace, and Relational-Cultural Theory. [read more]
Please see:
• Humiliation: Real Pain, A Pathway to Violence, the draft of Linda's paper for Round Table 2 of our 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York.
Humiliation: Assessing the Impact of Derision, Degradation, and Debasement, first published in The Journal of Primary Prevention, 19(4): 259-278, co-authored with T. Luchetta, 1999.
• Shame and Humiliation: From Isolation to Relational Transformation, the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMIT), Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College No. 88, Wellesley, MA 02481, co-authored with Wendy Rosen, Maureen Walker, Judith V. Jordan, 2000.
• Humiliation and Assistance: Telling the Truth About Power, Telling a New Story, paper prepared for the 5th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies 'Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People', in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005.
Mini-Documentary of the Annual Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict "The Globalization of Dignity," December 8 - 9, 2016

 



Gabriela Rodrigues Saab Riva, Organiser, and Convener

Gaby was the host of the WhatsApp Group for the conference.
She is a member of the HumanDHS Research Team and the HumanDHS Education Team.
Gaby has earned her PhD from the University of São Paulo. She holds two Masters in Public International Law and Human Rights. Her studies focus on human rights, environmental protection, and armed conflicts. She graduated from University of São Paulo with a Bachelor's Degree in Law and has completed the Sciences Po International Program in Paris, where she studied sustainable development policies. [read more]

 



Daniel Baron, Host, Organiser, and Convener

Daniel Baron is a community-based arts-educator and cultural activist, presently living and working in Marabá, in the Amazonian State of Pará, northern Brasil. He studied English Literature at Oxford University where he did doctoral research into theatre as popular education. After a decade of community theatre and mural collaborations dedicated to conflict transformation and social justice with excluded communities in Manchester (Northern England) and Derry (North of Ireland), in 1994 Dan accepted a permanent post in theatre and popular education at the University of Glamorgan, in Wales. He left Wales in 1998 to collaborate as a Visiting Professor at the State University of Santa Catarina and has been collaborating with communities within the Landless, Indigenous, Trade Union and University movements of Brasil ever since. His Pedagogy of Transformance emerged through these collaborations and dialogues with other cultural movements in Asia, Africa, Latin America and Europe. Two national awards in 2008 and 2010 from the Ministry of Culture and a national UNICEF award in 2011 allowed Dan to accept an invitation to live and collaborate with the Afro-Indigenous community of Cabelo Seco ('dry hair'), founding community of the city of Marabá, in the quest to develop sustainable communities through living popular culture.
Between 2004-10 Dan was the President of IDEA (International Drama/Theatre and Education Association), and Coordinator of the World Alliance for Arts Education between 2006-2010. He is a member of the World Council of the World Social Forum.
10th January 2018: Good Living Amazon is an alternative paradigm project. It is seeded in the small Afro- Indigenous community of Cabelo Seco, first settlement of Marabá City, between the threatened Itacaiúnas and Tocantins Rivers, Pará State. This region of the Brazilian Amazon has the greatest biodiversity and concentration of iron ore and drinking water in the world. But it also has the world’s highest statistic for murdered activists and contains the most violent cities (genocide of black youth and extreme abuse of women), with the worst high school education in Brasil. [read more]

Dan kindly sent us this in 2018 and 2019:
Letter from Marabá 1: Toxic promises
Letter from Marabá 2: Storms and fury
Letter from Marabá 3: Democracy in prison
Letter from Marabá 4: Our time will return
Letter from Marabá 5: University of good living
Letter from Marabá 6: Touched by the future
Open Diary 'Everything that no-one wants (in the shadows of dictatorship)', 7th September 2018
Atlas of the Future: Brasil’s rivers of creativity: Future League Rios de Encontro, 2019
Rios de Encontro: Towards a Good Living Amazon (Flying River Tour), August 2019

 



Francisco Cardoso Gomes de Matos, Peace Linguist, Linguista da Paz, Inspirer, Inspirador

Professor Francisco Gomes de Matos is the co-founder of ABA GLOBAL EDUCATION in Recife, Brasil, and the author of DIGNITY: A Multidimensional View (Dignity Press, 2013). He has taught linguistics and languages at the Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE) in Recife, northeastern Brasil till his retirement in 2003. He holds degrees in languages and law from UFPE and in linguistics from the University of Michigan and the Catholic University of São Paulo. [read more]

O que falta ao Brasil? What's Missing in Brasil?
by Francisco Gomes de Matos, a peace linguist, professor emeritus of Linguistics, Federal University of Pernambuco, and president of the Board, ABA Global Education, Recife, Brasil, 13th December 2017 (Pdf).
In ENEM, the Brazilian National Examination for College Entrance, taken by high school seniors, a written essay in Portuguese is required of examinees. If the topic of year 2017 had been 'What's missing in Brasil?' a resulting huge sample would be provided of how Brazilian pre-university students would perceive and describe gaps in the country's systems of education, pulic health, security, economy, agriculture, industry, media, technology, arts, sciences, inter-government power relations. The universe of essays would enable us to organize many lists, such as a list on what should be done to overcome hunger/poverty/absolute misery and to provide low-cost housing for the poor. Another list would be focused on core values which Brazilians would be short of, such as respect, honesty, integrity, spirituality. In the data bank of essays, we would find examples of Imaginative Citizenship (political parties which would prioritize public health, environmental co-rersponsibility. Imagine, for instance, a political party devoted to environmental dignity). The insights and reflections found in the essays would help adults exercise their critical thinking in a humbling manner, by welcoming young people's suggestions, especially those recommendations aimed at implementing a veritable Brazilianhood.
Dear reader, what do you think is missing in Brasil ? Make a list of such gaps as challenging problems and suggest solutions which would help TRANSform Brazilian positively. What's missing in Brasil so it can go beyond the national motto ORDER AND PROGRES? PluriDIGNITY, DIGNEducation, DIGNIpolitics, DIGNIcommunity living.
Dear reader, please probe the multidimensionality of DIGNITY in the current Brazilian context.

Professor Francisco Gomes de Matos, kindly gifted the following reflections to this conference:

Línguas Indígenas | O Direito à Água | The Right to Water
23rd April 2019

Amazon(i) a(s): um ecoreflexao
30th August 2019

Amazonia, uma vasta e variada regiao.
Da Ame'rica do Sul , ambiental coracao.
No Brasil,grande parte da Amazonia e' o portentoso Amazonas estado
Por um majestoso,navega'vel rio banhado
Amazonia, mais que uma extraordina'ria
riqueza natural
e' uma macrorealidade ecolo'gica que
requer sustentabilidade local, regional e universal

On sustainability
29th August 2019

Sustainability is deeply embedded in Nature
It is a life--long commitment by Humanity
to treat the environment with all Dignity
and to ensure people's right to Serenity

On the Dignity of the Amazonian region:
A global plea

26th August 2019

Among  Life-supporting Universals
Inherently yours and mine, one stands out: Dignity
Human Dignity we could view more comprehensively
by applying to Nature that uniQUALITY.
In such spirit, in this Conference context
let's speak of the Dignity o Nature and
inquire:
1- What is known about Amzonian ecological reality? Why?
2- Is the Amazonian region being treated dignifyingly? Why?
3- Are Amazonian indigenous communities protected by the local/federal government? Why?
4- Are Amazonian flora/fauna treated with respect?
5- How can the concept of Environmental Dignity of Amazonia be described / discussed economicalky,
educationally, politically, legally, sccientifically, technologically?
6- What Statement on the environmental Dignity of Amazonia could be drafted by the Conference participants in Portuguese, English and a local indigenous language as a Plea to be globally addressed by HumanDHS ?

Amazonicamente falando
Por sua DIGNIDADE pleiteando
7 de ago de 2019

A Dignidade da Amazonica regiao?
Esta' no respeito, no cuidado, no Amor
a sua flora, sua fauna, sua populacao

Humildade na Amazonica regiao?
De quem vive longe das grandes cidades
das florestas no coracao
nas margens ribeirinhas
onde sobrevivem criancinhas

Brasilidade na Amazonica regiao?
O Portugues e as Linguas que os indigenas falam
Culturas mantidas na diversa Nacao

A Regiao Amazonica ,como dignificar?
Para a EcoDignidade as novas geracoes educar

A Regiao Amazonica como proteger, preservar, fazer prosperar?
'A nossa Identidade Brasileira uma co-Identidade Amazonica aprendamos a acrescentar e cultivar

On Dignity: A Challenging Checklist
For the Marabá DIGNEVENT
25th April 2019
Dignity is a way of living
Dignity is a way of giving
Dignity is a way of forgiving
Dignity is a way of character-enhancing
Dignity is a way of humility-advancing
Dignity calls for everyday peaceful Communication
Dignity calls for everyday respectful Cooperation
Dignity calls for everyday economic Egalisation

On Amazonian Dignity: An Ecolinguistic View
For the Marabá DIGNEVENT
6th February 2019
Amazonian Dignity above us lies
Look at all the birds in its vast skies!
Amazonian Dignity below us is found
Listen! The fish make their own sound!
Amazonian Dignity its forests and all around
In its splendor, fauna and flora abound
Amazonian Dignity its legends and traditions thrive
Through indigenous languages its history is alive
Amazonian Dignity is the core of local Nature's Rights
Illuminating Amazonians' villages and cities with dignifying environmental lights

The DIGNalphabet
'In my humble DIGNalphabet, I am spiritually present in the Maraba Conference!'
15th April 2019
Altruism | Benevolence | Character-elevating | Decency | Empathy | Friendship | Goodness | Human Rights awareness | Integrity | Justice | Kindness | Law | Mercy | Nonviolence/Nonkilling | Open-mindedness | Peace | Questioning | Respect | Spirituality | Tenderness | Understanding | Virtue-valuing | World-Citizenship nurturing | Youth-inspiring

The Dignity Tree
(Portuguese)
4th May 2019
If DIGNITY was a tree
What would we see?
Among its branches, inspiringly there would be three:
Character-elevation | Behavior-amelioration | Life-quality transformation
Among the fruit Dignity would bear, what would you and me share?
Dignicharacter formation | Dignilogue cultivation | Digneconegalization | DigniNature preservation | DigniHumanity education
Please add to this imaginative piece!

Inspired by the words of Professor Francisco Gomes de Matos, these murals were painted by the pupils of Redjane Andrade, a teacher of English at a public school in Recife, in August 2019. It was made into a T-shirt that even Professor Francisco can wear!


Redjane Andrade kindly explained (18th September 2019): This Dignity Tree was painted on the wall in a event in my city Recife on 8th September 2019 by a graffitti artist. The women who painted the tree is my sister, she knows my work and project with students in public school. She lost her son in 2015, and he was a graffitti artist. She decided to join a group to help young people in socially vulnerable situations.

Francisco Gomes de Matos and Redjane Andrade (2019)
Dignity Studies Here!
Recife, Brazil, 17th October 2019.



 

Caravan of Dignity Dialogues in Marabá
28th August – 3rd September 2019

(See an explanation of the concept of Dignity + Dialogue = Dignilogue)

Our WhatsApp group!


Gaby Saab was the wonderful host of the WhatsApp Group for the conference!

Our dignity greeting!


Michael Boyer kindly suggested a new greeting, a Dignity Greeting!
(Evelin Lindner uses the infinity symbol, or the Möbius Strip, or the lying number 8, ∞, to make the 'unity in diversity' principle visible, and to show how this can help us model the form of dialogue that truly manifests the human rights ideal of 'every human being is equal in dignity'.)

Dignity is being (mis-)associated with the destruction of the Rainforest

In a meeting with nine Amazon state governors called by Jair Bolsonaro on 27th August 2019 to discuss the region’s wildfires, the president pushed the states to back his policies which seek to bring major mining and agribusiness operations onto indigenous lands (doing so would be a direct violation of the 1988 Constitution).
The governor of the Amazonian state of Mato Grosso, Mauro Mendes, speaking on behalf of agribusiness expansion, said that they will have a seminar on mechanised agriculture on indigenous lands next October, and that already 24 indigenous ethnic groups (of altogether 43 groups in his state) are interested. His explanation:
'That is because they want to have their dignity through their work, by exploring their lands'.


Backing Bolsonaro were the governors of Acre, Roraima, Tocantins, Rondônia, Amazonas, Mato Grosso and Amapá states. Only the Pará and Maranhão governors opposed opening more forest areas to development and favoured upholding current indigenous land use rights.
These were opinions voiced by Jair Bolsonary:
• About the Amazon Fund the president said: 'Much of the money comes from abroad, and it comes at a price: demarcation of indigenous lands, conservation areas, quilombolas, national parks. That leads to a place we already know, Brasil’s insolvency. We will have to face that issue somehow'. He offered no evidence that receipt of Amazon Fund moneys has ever been linked to any kind of mandatory land conservation.
• Jair Bolsonaro sees NGO's as 'an invasive international influence and threat to Brazilian sovereignty'.
• The president spoke about the obstacles to agribusiness in the Amazon: 'With all the quilombolas [residents of settlements first established by escaped slaves in Brasil], the reserves, and with environmental protection, our agribusiness will be made impossible. And if agribusiness is over, our economy is over'.
See 'State Governors Support Bolsonaro’s Amazon Mining, Agribusiness Plans', by Jenny Gonzales, Mongabay, 9th September 2019. Mongabay is a U.S.-based non-profit conservation and environmental science news platform

 



Day One, Wednesday, 28th August 2019, Marabá, Pará

 

The Câmara Municipal de Marabá, Prefeitura de Marabá, the City Hall of Marabá or the Marabá City Council

On the morning of Wednesday, 28th August 2019, at the opening of the ordinary session of the Câmara Municipal de Marabá, the City Hall of Marabá, the Marabá City Council welcomed the members of Mano’s and Dan’s Rivers of Encounter Project, as they were scheduled to leave for a tour of four European countries: Austria, Poland, Germany, and Belgium, on 2nd September. Six young people from the Cabelo Seco Community were on their way to defend the Amazon in Europe, showing the strength of culture and what they are doing to help preserve it.

The Câmara Municipal de Marabá, Prefeitura de Marabá, the City Hall of Marabá or the Marabá City Council, is made up of twenty-one seats since 2013 (until 2012 there were thirteen), when, by determination of the Superior Electoral Court, the municipalities got a number of councilors equivalent to their population. The old City Hall building was called Palacete Augusto Dias. The current City Hall building was opened on 23rd December 2010.


These are pictures of the Câmara Municipal de Marabá taken from the internet.


Still photos and videos of Day One:
• Please click here to see more pictures of the event. On the photo on the left, Manoela Souza is speaking to the City Hall. On the photo of the right: One of the speakers in the general event, Pedrinho Correa Lima (Abaetetuba, 28.10.1964–) Partido Trabalhista Brasileiro (PTB), one of the councilmen.
See an article in the local newspaper Correio: 'Jovens vão à Europa defender a Amazônia' (Pdf)
See the link on the maraba.pa.leg.br website: The Camera receives project rivers of meeting


See videos of Day One:

• See the video of the entire session (cell phone version) that was recorded by the City Hall and posted on their Facebook page


• See the video of the relevant section edited out by Evelin Lindner from Facebook. See also Rios de Encontro: Towards a Good Living Amazon (Flying River Tour)


• See the video recording of Evelin Lindner's message on her own camera. Dan Baron translated from English to Portuguese.


This is the AfroRaiz Collective (African Roots Collective) that left for a tour of Europe (Austria, Poland, Germany, and Belgium) on 2nd September 2019. On the picture on the left, they thank the participants of the national mental health day on 18th May 2019. On the right side, they celebrate their annual kite festival in their community Cabelo Seco (dry hair) in August 2019. They do so in the midst of the destruction of the Amazon.
• Please click on the pictures to see them larger. We thank Dan Baron for sharing them with us.



This was the situation in the Amazon, seen from Europe in July 2019: 'Brasil Continues to Destroy the Rainforest – But Resistance Is Growing' (Pdf) is an article that was published in Germany in July 2019, explaining how the forest is cut and telling the story of a small indigenous group who vows to resist. It does not mention European drivers of this destruction, such as the EU-Mercosur agreement. The article misleads the European reader to believe that the problem can be solved within Brasil. The European reader remains unaware that European interests work as an amplifier of the problem. Indeed, the problem did not get smaller after July, on the contrary, it got much worse, as fires were started everywhere on 10th August.


We ended the day at a restaurant on the banks of the river Tocantins.
From left: Gabriela Saab, Dan Baron, Manoela Soua, Evelin Lindner.
• Please click here to see more photos.

End of Day One

 


 

Day Two: Thursday, 29th August 2019, Marabá, Pará

 

House of Rivers, Cabelo Seco, Marabá, Pará

•  Welcome from the AfroRaiz Collective of young artists, cultural and pedagogical leaders from Cabelo Seco


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all photos of this morning session

•  Welcome from the hosts of this Dignity Caravan, Dan Baron and Manoela Souza, Directors of the Transformance Institute Culture & Education and its Community University of the Rivers

 

•  Welcome from the conference convener, Gabriela Rodrigues Saab Riva, Human Rights Law and Environmental Law (USP), Specialist in the Right to Water as a Human Right, Researcher of HumanDHS

 

•  Introduction to the Amazonian frame, Claudelice Santos, Sustainable Extractivist and Law of the Land undergraduate (University of South and South East Pará), sister of assassinated forest protector Zé Cláudio dos Santos

 

•  Introduction to the international frame: Who We Are: Our Global Dignity Family, Evelin Lindner, founder-president of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network and World Dignity University Initiative

 

•  12.30 Skype meeting with Johan Galtung and Antonio Carlos da Silva Rosa on the emergency in the Amazon

Johan Galtung is the principal founder of the discipline of peace and conflict studies, and he kindly agreed to offer his advice to the people in the Amazon who are in deep distress. He gifted one hour of his time to speak on Skype from his home in Spain. Antonio Carlos da Silva Rosa was so kind as to accompany Johan. Johan's main advice was to use all resources available, political, technical, scientific. He suggested to follow six steps (a mix of bottom-up and top-down approaches). As to bottom-up, his suggestion was to concentrate on raising those who are down, raising the poor, and to do that by forming collectives, cooperatives. His recommendation was to focus on clean water and organic food first, followed by energy, health and education. Work with the widows of people who lost their lives because of social and environment problems, he suggested, and make the stories of the victims known to a wider public. Finally, as for top-down solutions, he urged to go to the United Nations, maybe ask for the intervention of the peace keeping forces. Talk directly to the UN Secretary-General António Guterres, was his proposal, not only because of his position and moral obligations, but also because of the proximity between an influential Portuguese national and the Brazilian environmental and social problems.


• Please click on the photo above or here to see it larger
• See also a little video sequence selected from the hour long conversation

Johan Galtung, born 1930, is the principal founder of the discipline of peace and conflict studies. See also 'Johan Galtung, a Pioneer: Conceptualizing Peace Journalism', by Antonio C. S. Rosa, M.A., Editor - TRANSCEND Media Service Peace Journalism, 22nd October 2018.
Antonio Carlos da Silva Rosa, born 1946, is a pioneer in Peace Journalism. He is the founder-editor of the pioneering Peace Journalism website, TRANSCEND Media Service-TMS (from 2008), an assistant to Prof. Johan Galtung, Secretary of the International Board of the TRANSCEND Network for Peace Development Environment.
Please see this conference being mentioned on the TRANSCEND Member site.

 

• Session at the Escola Irmã Theodora, a public school in Marabá


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all photos of this afternoon session

Please see this letter from a group of young pupils from the Irmã Theoroda school about the destruction of the Amazon:

•  Portuguese original
•  English translation
•  German translation
•  French translation
•  Norwegian translation
(translations by Evelin Lindner)

• 3pm – 4pm Introduction by Gabriela Saab and dialogue session with students and teachers of the Law of the Land at the Federal University of Southern and Southeastern Pará (UNIFESSPA) in Marabá about restorative justice, and ecocide law


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all photos of this evening session

This is a letter to the International Criminal Court and to the UN Secretary-General from the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences and the World Council of Anthropological Associations on 30th August 2019, denouncing the Brazilian government for ecocide.

See also some background material:
• Ecocide law: 'The Whanganui River in New Zealand is a legal person. A nearby forest is too. Soon, the government will grant a mountain legal personhood as well. Here's how it happened, and what it may mean', by Kennedy Warne, National Geographic, April 2019.
• Social media: General Data Protection Regulation
• Healing and resilience: 'Territories of Life' Indigenous and Community Conserved Area (ICCA), Great Transition Initiative, Transition Towns, Human Rights Cities, Ecovillages, Urban agriculture, Boston Food Forest Coalition (BFFC)

• 4pm – 5pm Introduction by Evelin Lindner and dialogue session with students and teachers of the Law of the Land at the Federal University of Southern and Southeastern Pará (UNIFESSPA) about healing pedagogies and practices, resilience studies, social media for dignity

Evelin had been asked to touch upon healing pedagogies and practices, resilience studies, social media for dignity. After Gaby's talk she therefore briefly shared with the audience that dignity basically cannot be defined theoretically, that it is embodied. One way to make it visible is by two people holding hands in the way the infinity symbol is formed.

Equal dignity in solidarity is manifested when both partners stay connected while looking into each other's eyes as equals. In this way, they demonstrate unity in diversity (this represents the philosophical notion of non-dualism). Loving solidarity is the strongest force there is.

When we look at societies around the world, however, we can observe two main toxic 'degradations' of this setup:
1. There is the sociocide – the destruction of the social fabric – that occurs in contexts of oppressive hierarchies and it can be demonstrated by one partner standing above the other. Oppressive hierarchies are kept in place by superiors humiliating inferiors, for example, men humiliate women and everything perceived as ‘female’, 'industrial/breadwinner masculinities' dominate, exploit, and mistreat also 'mother' nature. In this situation, many subordinates close their eyes in apathetic resignation, or they look up, either in subservient admiration or in fearful disgust. Some live in the hope or in the illusion that reaching out to superiors and offering them to kiss their hands will make them more caring, while others refuse to reach out to uncaring superordinates and others even contemplate mutiny and revolt. The result is a society characterised by:
1a. apathetic obedience,
1b. the 'Stockholm syndrome', or the identification with the oppressor,
1c. solidarity among those who unite in hatred against oppressors, often in blind obedience to messiah-like anti-leaders.
Conclusion: Noone exits from the top-down frame.

2. Then there is the sociocide inflicted by excessive individualism in Western societies. This can be showcased by both partners remaining equal, that is, both standing upright with their heads at the same height, yet, no longer holding hands but keeping a certain distance from each other or even raising their hands in hostility. Some clasp their hands in front of their chests in self-righteous solipsism, despising and humiliating everyone as lazy who can't buy goods and services with money, in other words, a sophisticated form of the 'Stockholm syndrome' with money as seemingly neutral confirmation of the legitimacy of the principle that only money-based contracts count, while nature or future generations represent insignificant externalities. Others throw their hands up in the air in despair and indignation at the lack of social connectivity and care in society, while yet others use their hands to lash out against scapegoats. The result is a society characterised by:
2a. anomie, isolation, loneliness,
2b. callousness,
2c. hatred.
Conclusion: Noone exits from the illusion of equality in a top-down frame.

Evelin shared some more reflections with Gabriela Saab at the end of this day:
First, when one is being humiliated, it is important to actually feel it (rather than bypass it or suppress it), while, at the same time, extending deep compassionate care to one's violated sense of self. The aim must be to avoid accepting humiliation, to avoid weakening oneself by turning humiliation into shame. Only then is one able to gauge the situation calmly, only then can one read the situation properly and duly prepare for what to do next.
Second: Lets not run from the bullets but also not into the bullets! The Jews of Vienna were being systematically humiliated by their Nazi abusers (old men were forced to go down on their knees and brush the streets of Vienna, even with toothbrushes). This humiliation was basically the first step on the path to a death sentence. Many of the Jews who were thus 'prepared' had no strength left when they faced death camps. Jews from Greece, in contrast, still had strength left when they arrived in Auschwitz on the train from Greece, and they openly revolted. As a result, they were shot on the spot by the SS men. In other words, both groups did not have a chance to achieve some kind of valid resistance: the first groupd had no strength left, the second no time.
Conclusion: Preserve your dignified sense of self and your strength, even in the face of humiliation, stay calm, so that you can form collectives, hide in solidarity, and plan appropriately. Use the strongest force there is as much as possible: loving solidarity. Nurture this solidarity within the group, avoid building in-group solidarity on out-group hatred, otherwise, you can never turn your 'enemies' into friends.

End of Day Two

 


 

Day Three: Friday for the Future, 30th August 2019, Marabá, Pará

 

• 10am – 12am Sandro Campos and Célia Campos interviewed Dan Baron, Evelin Lindner, and Gabriela Saab in Radio Correio 92.1


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all photos of this radio session, and listen to the interview!

• In the House of Rivers in Cabelo Seco: Manoela Souza invited Gaby, Evelin, and Dan to a delicious dinner


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all photos of this evening.
• On the left side, you see the famous radio bycicle donated by a Dutch anthropologist, after he had visited. See it in action in Rios de Encontro: Towards a Good Living Amazon (Flying River Tour).
• In the middle you see a unique library, a library whose aim it is to be empty: its books are given to the community!
• On the right side you see the amazing dinner that Mano had prepared!

• 7pm – 9.30pm House of Rivers in Cabelo Seco: Performance of Flying Rivers by AfroRaiz Collective, with songs by local poets, followed by Roundtable with social movements and community activists

 

• 9.30pm Circle of Love Gifts (Video)


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 35 photos of this 'Circle of Love Gifts' session
• See also a little video


Evelin lives globally, and whenever she receives a gift in one part of the world, she takes it to another part of the world and looks for a worthy recipient for that gift. The concept is called 'circle of love gifts'. When she has found a worthy recipient, she tries to take a picture of the recipient and sends it to the giver of the gift (the photos you see above will therefore be sent to the givers of the gifts). In that way, not only is her global life a bridge-building endeavour, also the gifts that she carries help build more bridges. It is also a 'footprint' of her path through the world. Her suitcase is therefore always full of gifts, and she rather wears the clothes of her hosts. Here you see her in Mano’s and Dan’s House of Rivers in Cabelo Seco, in this case, with gifts from Egypt, Norway, Germany, New York, and India.

End of Day Three

 


 

Day Four: Saturday, 31st August 2019, two hours by car and boat from the city of Marabá

 

This was an all-day excursion to two fishing communities – the Vila Praia Alta community on the island Ilha Praia Alta in the river Tocantins, and to the Tauiry community on the shores of the river Tocantins – hosted and mentored by biologist and fishing monitor Cristiane (Cris) Vieira da Cunha

The Amazon is threatened not just by logging, not just by arson to clear land for cattle and soya production, it is also threatened by mining, the building of dams, and the blasting of rocks – in this case, the rocks of the Pedral de Lourenção on the way to Ilha Praia Alta – and to turn natural rivers into industrial highways or 'hydrovias'.


• Gabriela Saab and Evelin Lindner had the privilege to have UNIFESSPA professor and researcher Cristiane Vieira da Cunha as host and mentor. In this video, she explains how the Participatory Monitoring Project helps riverside communities understand more about their own activities.

Dan Baron kindly sent us this picture on 7th September 2017, and he wrote: 'I attach three photos of our intervention on the 43k of rocks threatened to be destroyed to make way for huge cargo ships, from the final day of the forum, and three clips (from many) in solidarity with the Amazon. Feel free to use them as you wish'.


• Alerta popular pela proteção do bem viver no Pedral do Lourenção, 7th September 2017, photos sent by Dan Baron
• On the right side: O canto de jovens ribeirinhos em defesa do Pedral do Lourenção (Pará), 16 de outubro de 2019


• See on the left photo the Pedral do Lourenção rocks are part of the Central Brazilian Plateau, an upland area formed one billion years ago of hard crystalline old rocks. See 'Pedral do Lourenção: Para IBAMA, ainda é preciso complementar estudos ambientais', por Redação, Correio de Carajas, 17 de setembro de 2019
• See on the left photo a larger poster on the wall in the Tauiry fishing village

Gabriela Saab shared this with the WhatsApp group on 31st August 2019:
Dear Dignifriends, tonight I would like to introduce you to a fishing community called Tauiry, in Pará! There we had the opportunity to understand better and learn with these amazingly humble people. They are extremely dependent on the Tocantins River, which already have a big Dam an there is a project of a Waterway to export non-sustainable extractivism products! The project will not only affect more than 70% of their income but will also make some islands (like the one in the pictures below) completely disappear. All this without any sort of previous compensation so they can restart their lives somewhere else. And they received us with so many smiles and hugs we will NEVER forget! It is like we brought them hope just by listenning to them, but funny enough is their sustainable way of life and the way they are organizing themselves for their rights and the rights of the river what brought Us hope! As Evelin said, the world has to come to those places to learn with these people. They should not change! They are the hope!

International Rivers website: On the Tocantins river, five large dams have already been constructed (Tucurui, Estreito, Serra da Mesa, Cana Brava and Lajeado) and two new large dams (Serra Quebrada and Marabá) are planned. ... Another major threat to the rivers and people ot the Araguaia-Tocantins basin are plans to channelize and blast rock outcroppings along 1,782 km of the Araguaia and the Rio das Mortes, as well as sections of the Tocantins to construct an industrial waterway, or hidrovia, to lower the cost of transporting soybeans for export.

Wikipedia: The Tucuruí Dam (Tucuruí means "grasshopper's water", translated from Tupí language; Portuguese: Tucuruí) is a concrete gravity dam on the Tocantins River located on the Tucuruí County in the State of Pará, Brasil... The dam was built primarily as a source of hydroelectricity and second for navigation between the upper and lower Tocantins River... Impact: The Tucuruí Dam brought power to 13 million people and 60% of the power is transferred to industries which create just under 2,000 jobs. Between 25,000 and 35,000 people were removed from the future reservoir zone in the early 1980s. 14,000 people were relocated by the government. 3,750 of these people moved to new islands created by the reservoir which lack adequate infrastructure. Construction of the dam attracted migrants which, along with the reservoir, significantly increased malaria and AIDS cases. The completion of Phase I in 1984 led to a large amount of unemployment among its 20,000 employees and subsequent migration from the area. The flooded area is in the Tocantins-Araguaia-Maranhão moist forests ecoregion, the most degraded in the Amazon region. The overall large influx of people to the area has led to deforestation and negative impacts from increased cattle-raising. The increases of population have also strained existing infrastructure or lack thereof.

We started in Marabá at 5 o'clock in the morning, first by car and then by boat. On the way, we made a breakfast break. Then we took pictures from the car of one of the insidious problems that plagues the Amazon: the destruction of the Rainforest so that cows can graze, so that people can eat more meat (see the EU-Mercosur agreement), and the few landowners can amass more power... The problem are not small farmers. When Evelin Lindner was in Brasil in 2012, she inquired (see 2012 Digniventure reflections) and found the MIT Project Amazonia website showing that 0.8% of landlords possess 43% of the land, 53% of landowners (small peasants) own 2.7% of the land, while Multinationals own 36 million hectares of Brazilian territory. Pará is double the size of Western Europe and it is normal for a land owner to own half a million cattle. Pará has a sad reputation for its hired gunmen. See als: 'Revealed: Rampant Deforestation of Amazon Driven by Global Greed for Meat', by Dom Phillips and Daniel Camargos in São Félix do Xingu, Andre Campos in São Paulo, and Andrew Wasley and Alexandra Heal in London, The Guardian, 2nd July 2019: 'Investigation exposes how Brasil’s huge beef sector continues to threaten health of world’s largest Rainforest: "We must not barter the Amazon Rainforest for burgers and steaks" ... 'Because of the high volume of Brazilian beef shipped to China and Hong Kong, these markets are associated with the highest amount of deforestation in total – between 17,400 and 26,400 hectares per year – according to the analysis. The EU also imports more than $600m worth of beef from Brasil each year. And that will increase if the EU and member states approve a new trade deal with Brasil, Uruguay, Argentina and Paraguay to gradually let 99,000 tonnes of low-tariff South American beef into Europe every year'. See, furthermore: 'Revealed: How the Global Beef Trade Is Destroying the Amazon', by Andrew Wasley, Alexandra Heal, Dom Phillips, Daniel Camargos, Mie Lainio, André Campos, Diego Junqueira, Bureau of Investigative Journalism, 2nd July 2019.

 


• Please click on the photos above on the left or here to see all 38 photos of our journey to the fishing community on the island in the Tocantins river. We could not see the Pedral do Lourenção rocks, because the water level of the river is now artificially controlled and the rocks are submerged. We saw only one little peak looking out from the water.
• Please cick on the photo on the right or here to see a short video of our return journey in the afternoon, first on the river and later on the road.

Upon arrival by car, we continued by boat to a fishing community on the Praia Alta island in the middle of the river Tocantins, passing the famous Pedral do Lourenção rocks (which we could not see, due to the artificially high water levels). Evelin Lindner's report: We learned that the water of the river is already so polluted that the people living on its shores can no longer drink it: they have to fetch it from another village which still has clean water. We saw a big installation in the river, and we were told that it is to extract diamonds – the local population, however, does not in any way benefit from this extraction – yet, this is only a small source of the pollution of the river. A hydro-electric dam has already been built in the north of Marabá, the Tucuruí dam, against the resistance of many people, and now the next step of this mega-project is being scheduled, namely, to turn the river into a navigable waterway for big ships – a hydrovia – to transport cattle, GM soya, and aluminium. Boulders that are a billion years old, in other words, billion years of eco-infrastructure, shall be removed to industrialise the river. The local population will no longer be able to use their small boats to go the city and to sell their own sustainable products. The water level is already now artificially controlled, so that the fishermen, whose calendar normally depends on the moon and who respect the periods in which fish is reproducing, now have their areas of reproduction and the level of the river dictated by this new 'hydrovia'.

Vila Praia Alta on the Ilha de Praia Alta, an island in the river Tocantins two hours by car and boat Marabá in the Amazonian State of Pará, the first community we had the privilege of meeting this day



• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 90 photos of the time Gaby and Evelin had the privilege of being welcomed in Vila Praia Alta to listen and learn.

These were the vides we made in Vila Praia Alta:
08 The Babaçu Palm and Its Beetle Larva Gongo in Vila Praia Alta on Ilha do Praia Alta in the river Tocantins near Marabá in the Amazonian State of Pará, Brasil
09 Tapioca in Vila Praia Alta
10 Urucum in Vila Praia Alta
11 The World Dignity University Initiative in Vila Praia Alta
12 Manoel de Deus Gomes da Silva in Vila Praia Alta
13 Leaving Praia Alta island by boat and at the end of the day back to Marabá by car

Gaby and Evelin were deeply impressed by the sustainability of the ways of living we encountered here. We saw almost no plastic, almost no waste, everything was used. Here, animals have a life, rather than being 'produced'. A rooster crows in the morning, indicating that animals are allowed to have a family, to have a social life in their own right, rather than being reduced to servants of human needs – being used as pets at best (to help placate the loneliness and disconnection in societies of excessive individualism), or consumed as food. The kitchen is outside of the house under an umbrella! And the shell of the babaçu nuts serve as charcoal!

Please click here or on the photo to see a brief video where Evelin explains the relevance of communities like Vila Praia Alta for the idea of the World Dignity University Initiative.

Please click here or on the photo to see the video with Manoel de Deus Gomes da Silva. Manoel de Deus Gomes da Silva, membro da comunidade ribeirinha Vila Praia Alta, fala sobre a importância da preservação da herança cultural das comunidades tradicionais da região do Rio Tocantins em que se pretende construir uma Hidrovia que impactará o rio, a fauna, a flora e a produção sustentável pesqueira e extrativista na região. Manoel de Deus Gomes da Silva, a member of the Vila Praia Alta community on Ilha Praia Alta, an island in the river Tocantins in the Amazonian State of Pará in Brasil, talks about the importance of preserving the cultural heritage of the traditional communities of the Tocantins River region in which it is intended to build a waterway that will impact the river, fauna, flora and sustainable fishery and permaculture production in the region.

This is the famous beetle larva gongo! Please see a little video recording! Please click on the photos or here to see all 90 photos of the Vila Praia Alta fishing community that welcomed Gaby and Evelin to listen and learn. Here you see gongo larvae inside the babaçu palm and its fruits. The coconut bug (Pachymerus nucleorum) is a beetle larva of the Bruquidae family. It has wide Brazilian distribution, which develops inside the fruit of several palm trees, such as babassu, coconut, carnauba, among others. He is also known by the names of gong, Coró and morotó. Pachymerus nucleorum settles inside fruits, which is also known as the 'larva of the coconut' (translated from the Portuguese Wikipedia site; the photos above in the middle are taken from another site). Here, we found it in the babaçu (Attalea speciosa) palm, or cusi, a palm native to the Amazon Rainforest region. The babassu palm is the predominant species in the Maranhão Babaçu forests of Maranhão and Piauí states. Even though Gaby and I live as much as possible vegan or vegetarian, we had to admit that the fried larvae were a delicacy! They are clean, full of protein...

Here, Gaby is wearing the urucum lip gloss! The original Tupi name for this fruit is uruku, urucu or urucum ('red color'), which is also used for the body paint prepared from its seeds. Achiote (Bixa orellana) is a shrub – also called the lipstick tree – native to a region between northern South America and Mexico. The seeds can be used to make red body paint and lipstick, as well as a spice. (Source of the second photo.) Please see a little video recording that Gaby made with her cell phone! Please click on the photos or here to see all 90 photos of the Vila Praia Alta fishing community.

Gaby loved this fruit, called 'marmelada fruit', Gaby's favourite! Thank you, dear Ronaldo, for explaining that its scientific name is Alibertia sessilis.

Embaúba is the name of this tree. The name originates from the tupi term ãba'ib, meaning 'hollow tree', 'árvore oca'. Old Tupi or classical Tupi is an extinct Tupian language which was spoken by the native Tupi people of Brasil, mostly those who inhabited coastal regions in South and Southeast Brasil. See cecropia. Please click on the photos or here to see all 90 photos of the Vila Praia Alta fishing community that welcomed Gaby and Evelin to listen and learn. 

The cashew tree (Anacardium occidentale) is a tropical evergreen tree that produces the cashew seed and the cashew apple. It can grow as high as 14 meters.... The species is native to Central America, the Caribbean Islands, and northern South America. Portuguese colonists in Brasil began exporting cashew nuts as early as the 1550s.... The cashew seed, often simply called a cashew, is widely consumed.... The cashew apple is a light reddish to yellow fruit. Please click on the photos or here to see all 90 photos of the Vila Praia Alta fishing community that welcomed Gaby and Evelin to listen and learn. 

Tapioca is a starch extracted from the storage roots of the cassava plant (Manihot esculenta). This species is native to the north region and central-west region of Brasil, but its use spread throughout South America. The plant was carried by Portuguese and Spanish explorers to most of the West Indies and Africa and Asia. It is a perennial shrub adapted to the hot conditions of tropical lowlands. Cassava copes better with poor soils than many other food plants.
See a brief video recording that Gaby made with her cell phone. Please click on the photo or here to see all 90 photos of the Vila Praia Alta fishing community that welcomed Gaby and Evelin to listen and learn. 

Pineapples (ananás) may be cultivated from the offset produced at the top of the fruit, possibly flowering in five to ten months and fruiting in the following six months... In 2016, Costa Rica, Brasil, and the Philippines accounted for nearly one-third of the world's production of pineapples. Please click on the photo or here to see all 90 photos of the Vila Praia Alta fishing community that welcomed Gaby and Evelin to listen and learn. 

 

 

Tauiry, a fishing community on the shores of the river Tocantins, the second community we had the privilege of meeting this day

These were the vides we made in Tauiry:
14 Rafael Cabral in Tauiry
15 Cristiane (Cris) Vieira da Cunha in Tauiry
16 Ronaldo Macena do Tauiry in Tauiry



• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 32 photos of the time Gaby and Evelin had the privilege of being welcomed in Tauiry to listen and learn.

A professora e pesquisadora da UNIFESSPA, Cristiane Vieira da Cunha, explica como o Projeto de Monitoramento Participativo auxilia comunidades ribeirinhas a compreender mais sobre suas atividades. A partir dos dados recolhidos pelos próprios pescadores, é possível compreender como grandes projetos como a Hidrovia do Rio Tocantins irão afetar não apenas seu modo de vida sustentável, mas também o próprio equilíbrio ecológico dos biomas amazônicos (Projeto ProPesca - com apoio da Universidade Federal do Sul e Sudeste do Pará - UNIFESSPA, da Embrapa e com o financiamento do Fundo Amazônia). Para maiores informações sobre o projeto, entrar em contato com: crisvieira_cunha@hotmail.com.
UNIFESSPA professor and researcher Cristiane Vieira da Cunha explains how the Participatory Monitoring Project helps riverside communities understand more about their own activities. From the data collected by fishermen, it is possible to understand how major projects, such as the Tocantins River Waterway, not only affect their sustainable way of life, but also the ecological balance of the Amazon biomes (ProPesca Project - with the support of the Federal University of South and Southeast Pará - UNIFESSPA, Embrapa, and the financing of the Amazon Fund).
For more information about the project send an email to: crisvieira_cunha@hotmail.com.
See a video recording that Gaby made with her cell phone. Please click on the photo or here to see all 32 photos of the Tauiry fishing community that welcomed Gaby and Evelin to listen and learn. 
Embrapa (Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária) is a state-owned Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation affiliated with the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture. Since its inception on 26th April 1973, it has been devoted to developing technologies, knowledge and technical-scientific information aimed at Brazilian agriculture, including livestock.

Rafael Cabral, membro da comunidade ribeirinha Vila Belém (Pará), fala sobre a importância da preservação da herança cultural das comunidades tradicionais da região do Rio Tocantins em que se pretende construir uma Hidrovia que impactará o rio, a fauna, a flora e a produção sustentável pesqueira e extrativista na região. Rafael faz um apelo aos doadores do Fundo Amazônia, em especial à Noruega, para que os projetos sustentáveis na região possam ter continuidade.
Rafael Cabral, a member of the Vila Belém riverside community (State of Pará), talks about the importance of preserving the cultural heritage of the traditional communities of the Tocantins River region in which it is intended to build a waterway that will impact the river, fauna, flora and sustainable fishery and permaculture production in the region. Rafael calls on Amazon Fund donors, especially Norway, to continue sustainable projects in the region.
See a brief video recording that Gaby made with her cell phone. Please click on the photo or here to see all 32 photos of the Tauiry fishing community that welcomed Gaby and Evelin to listen and learn. 

Ronaldo Macena, membro da comunidade ribeirinha Tauiry (Pará), fala sobre a importância da preservação da herança cultural das comunidades tradicionais da região do Rio Tocantins em que se pretende construir uma Hidrovia que impactará o rio, a fauna, a flora e a produção sustentável pesqueira e extrativista na região. Ronaldo faz um apelo aos doadores do Fundo Amazônia, em especial à Noruega, para que os projetos sustentáveis na região possam ter continuidade.
Ronaldo Macena, a member of the Tauiry riverside community (State of Pará), talks about the importance of preserving the cultural heritage of the traditional communities of the Tocantins River region in which it is intended to build a waterway that will impact the river, fauna, flora and sustainable fishery and permaculture production in the region. Ronaldo calls on Amazon Fund donors, especially Norway, to continue sustainable projects in the region. See a brief video recording that Gaby made with her cell phone. Please click on the photo or here to see all 32 photos of the Tauiry fishing community that welcomed Gaby and Evelin to listen and learn. 

Please meet Professor Paulo and his students and their Com-Vida project. He teaches in Itupiranga, near Tauiry. In a highly skilled and sophisticated way, everyone in the group spoke, laying out their impressions, reflections, and conclusions. Clearly, the talking stick method was being used (without an actual stick), which is a well-known 'instrument of aboriginal democracy used by many communities around the world', ensuring that everyone is given space to speak.

These were the reflections Evelin tried to share with the fishermen that Gaby and I met near Marabá. They clearly had been told – and they felt guilty accordingly – for ‘standing in the way of progress’ because they wish to hold on to their familiar lifestyle, remain on their land and not be evicted by industrialisation. I tried to explain to them that THEY represent progress in its true form, and that it is rather the rest of the world that stands in the way of progress. The rest of the world ought to come to THEM and learn from THEM how to live as part of nature, instead of continuing with the illusion that humanity can be nature’s master. I tried to explain that they are the stark opposite of, for instance, coal miners, who actually do stand in the way of progress if they force coal mines to stay open with the argument that they wish to hold on to their familiar lifestyle...

End of Day Four

 


 

Day Five: Sunday, 1st September 2019, Nova Ipixuna, two hours from Marabá, Pará

 

This was an all-day excursion under the mentorship of Claudelice dos Santos to the Assentamento (settlement) de Nova Ipixuna, site of murder of Zé Cláudio and Maria Silva, two forest activists and their living project


• Please meet Claudelice dos Santos! She is a sustainable extractivist and Law of the Land undergraduate (University of South and South East Pará), and sister of assassinated forest protector Zé Cláudio dos Santos

These were the videos we made on this day:
17 The cross for Claudio and Maria
18 Evandra Vilacoert on fire containment
19 How Evandra Vilacoert's fire brigade contained fires
20 Michelliny Bentes on sustainable technologies to traditional communities
21 Daniel Mangas on sustainable technologies to traditional communities
22 Daniel Santiago and Anderson Schwamke on sustainable honey production
23 Chicken life in the Amazon
23.1 Claudelice dos Santos and Her Forest School Project (only accessible upon request)


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 39 photos of our journey to the Assentamento (Settlement) de Nova Ipixuna, ca. one and a half hours by car north of Marabá. Gabriela Saab and Evelin Lindner were privileged to have Claudelice dos Santos as our host, mediator, and mentor.
• Photo on the left: The first interesting sight we encountered was the unending train wagons transporting the riches of the Amazon out of it. We learned that this train was built for that purpose, not for transporting people.
• Photos on the right: The next surprise were the deep grooves in the asphalt of the road. The explanation: Big trucks cause them when they drive out from the Amazon heavily loaded (the trucks return empty). The road is almost unusable for normal cars, it seemed, and required very good driving skills. Evelin took these snapshots out of the car.



• Please click on the photo above on the left side to see a brief video that Gaby made of the place where Claudelice's brother Claudio and his wife Maria were assassinated by gun men in 2011 for speaking up against forest degradation. When Evelin was in Marabá in 2012, this was still fresh, and Claudelice was in deep grief and shock.
• See Claudio and Maria on the photo on the right, and see also 'The Death of Zé Cláudio and Maria: The Scene Is Like Something out of a Sergio Leone Movie. Zé Cláudio and His Wife, Maria, Enter a Small Wooden Bar Off a Dirt Road', by Felipe Milanez, Vice Media, 7th November 2011. See also Wikipedia: 'José Cláudio Ribeiro da Silva (January 22, 1957 – May 24, 2011) was a Brazilian conservationist and environmentalist who campaigned against logging and clearcutting of trees in the Amazon Rainforest'.

Comunidades contra o fogo na Amazônia / Communities Against the Amazon Fires:
Evandra Vilacoert, gerente do Ideflor (Araguaia), explica o trabalho dos brigadistas comunitários no combate às queimadas e fala sobre a sua escolha de privilegiar os trabalhadores e o conhecimento locais como forma de promover a sustentabilidade.
Evandra Vilacoert, manager of Ideflor (Araguaia), explains the work of community brigade members in fighting fires and she talks about their choice to privilege local workers and knowledge as a way to promote sustainability.
See a video recording of her dialogue with Gaby Saab, invited and recorded by Evelin Lindner.

Comunidades contra o fogo na Amazônia / Communities Against the Amazon Fires:
Filmagens realizadas por brigadistas comunitários demonstrando seu trabalho no combate às queimadas (Ideflor/Araguaia). Os bombeiros e bombeiras fazem uso de técnicas locais e mais sustentáveis (menor uso de água) e salvam uma ave rara conhecida como Seriema.
Videos made by the community brigade members demonstrating their work in stopping the fires (Ideflor / Araguaia). Firefighters make use of more sustainable local techniques (less water use) and save a rare bird known as the Seriema.
Para maiores informaçoes sobre o trabalho dos brigadistas comunitários coordenados por Evandra Vilacoert, acesse aqui ou escreva para vilacoert@hotmail.com
For more information about the community brigade coordinated by Evandra Vilacoert, see here or send an email to vilacoert@hotmail.com

Fundo Amazônia é vital para Comunidades Tradicionais Sustentáveis / The Amazon Fund is vital to sustainable traditional communities:
Michelliny Bentes explica como projeto da Embrapa em parceria com o Fundo Amazônia leva tecnologias sustentáveis a comunidades tradicionais na Amazônia. Michelliny Bentes explains how a project by Embrapa in partnership with the Amazon Fund brings sustainable technologies to traditional communities in the Amazon.
Please click on the photo on the left to see a video recording of her dialogue with Gaby Saab, recorded by Daniel Mangas. Please click on the photo on the right or here to see all 13 photos of the recording session.
Embrapa (Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária) is a state-owned Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation affiliated with the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture. Since its inception on 26th April 1973, it has been devoted to developing technologies, knowledge and technical-scientific information aimed at Brazilian agriculture, including livestock.

Fundo Amazônia é vital para Comunidades Tradicionais Sustentáveis / Amazon Fund is vital to sustainable traditional communities:
Daniel Mangas explica como projeto da Embrapa em parceria com o Fundo Amazônia leva tecnologias sustentáveis a comunidades tradicionais na Amazônia. Daniel Mangas explains how a project by Embrapa in partnership with the Amazon Fund brings sustainable technologies to traditional communities in the Amazon.
Please click on the photo on the left to see a video recording of his dialogue with Gaby Saab, recorded by Anderson Schwamke. Please click on the photo on the right or here to see all 13 photos of the recording session.
Embrapa (Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária) is a state-owned Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation affiliated with the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture. Since its inception on 26th April 1973, it has been devoted to developing technologies, knowledge and technical-scientific information aimed at Brazilian agriculture, including livestock.

Fundo Amazônia possibilita a aprendizagem da produção do mel por agroextrativistas sustentáveis / Amazon Fund enables sustainable horticulturers to learn about the honey production: Daniel Santiago e Anderson Schwamke explicam o projeto da Embrapa em parceria com o Fundo Amazônia que leva tecnologias sustentáveis a comunidades tradicionais na Amazônia. Daniel Santiago and Anderson Schwamke explain how a project by Embrapa in partnership with the Amazon Fund brings sustainable technologies to traditional communities in the Amazon. Please click on the photo on the left to see a video recording of their dialogue with Gaby Saab, recorded by Daniel Mangas. Please click on the photo on the right or here to see all 13 photos of the recording session.
Embrapa (Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária) is a state-owned Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation affiliated with the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture. Since its inception on 26th April 1973, it has been devoted to developing technologies, knowledge and technical-scientific information aimed at Brazilian agriculture, including livestock.

Here, animals have a life, rather than being 'produced'. A rooster crows in the morning, indicating that animals are allowed to have a family, to have a social life in their own right, rather than being reduced to servants of human needs – being used as pets at best (to help placate the loneliness and disconnection in societies of excessive individualism), or consumed as food. Evelin made this little video, fondly remembering the rooster's wake up call in the morning in her childhood on a traditional farm in Germany. Villages in Germany are silent now. Industrial farming has vastly impoverished rural life and contributed to widespread sociocide and ecocide.


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 29 photos of our wonderful learning and listening time in Nova Ipixuna. After a delicious lunch, Gaby and Evelin had the privilege of being invited to be part in yet another profoundly dignified and dignifying community gathering.

Gaby and Evelin were hugely impressed by the profoundly dignified and dignifying format of the community gatherings we had the privilege of being invited to. In a highly skilled and sophisticated way, everyone was given the floor to speak, all participants laid out their impressions, reflections, and conclusions, one after the other. Clearly, the talking stick format was used (without an actual stick), the well-known 'instrument of aboriginal democracy used by many tribes', a method that ensures that everyone is given space to speak.


• We admired their cosmetic products – soap, oil, insect repellent, lotion – from Andiroba. Andiroba is native to the Amazon and is widely used by the indigenous populations of the northern region of Brasil.



The pictures above were shared by Dan Baron in 2012 as examples of how the exploitation of the Amazon is being 'sanitised' and depicted as being 'good for the people and the environment', in advertisements by the big corporations. This is the text: 'Belo Monte Dam Banco da Amazônia – Movimentando a Amazônia: E a sua vida: FNO: crédito para transformar a sua vida e a Amazônia. Banco da Amazônia' ('Moving Amazon: And your life: FNO (Fundo Constitucional de Financiamento do Norte/Constitutional Financing Fund of the North: credit to transform your life and the Amazon').


Indeed, life has been transformed in the Amazon. We saw the signs of 'destruction for the sake of modernity' everywhere: hydro dams for the production of electricity that does not support sustainable living but feeds an exploitative industrialisation, and forest degradation for the sake of cows for the hunger for meat and profit for a privileged few.
• Please click here to see all 42 photos of our way back from Nova Ipixuna to Marabá.


• The day ended with an interview with Claudelice dos Santos in the park back in Marabá.

End of Day Five

 

 

Day Six: Monday, 2nd September 2019, Marabá, Pará

This happened in Belém while Gabriela and Evelin still were in Marabá preparing to travel from Marabá to Belém next day:
Brasil's president Jair Bolsonaro ordered his ministers to meet with the governors of the Amazonian states on 2nd September 2019 in Belém and send a package of new measures to Congress. In that meeting, five Amazon governors and ministers met. Among those attending were Minister of Agriculture Tereza Cristina (a ruralist with large agricultural holdings) and Minister of Defense Fernando Azevedo.

See State Governors Support Bolsonaro’s Amazon Mining, Agribusiness Plans', by Jenny Gonzales, Mongabay, 9th September 2019.
Mongabay is a U.S.-based non-profit conservation and environmental science news platform.

A wonderful meeting with Cristiane Vieira da Cunha in Marabá


• Please click here to see all 14 photos of this day in Marabá. We have a wonderful morning with Cris, Cristiane Vieira da Cunha!

Waving good-bye good-bye to the AfroRaiz group


• Please click here to see all 14 photos of this day in Marabá. Here, we are waving good-bye to Dan, Mano and the AfroRaiz group, who is leaving for their two months long tour of Europe (Austria, Poland, Germany, Belgium)

One of the riches of the Amazon: Açaí!


• Please click here to see all 14 photos of this day in Marabá. Here you see Gaby and Evelin with blue tongues from too much Açaí icecream!

 

Sending a thank-you to South Africa


• Please click here to see all 14 photos of this day in Marabá. Here Evelin is sending thanks to Catherine Odora Hoppers, who gave her this special T-shirt in Pretoria in 2013! Thank you, dear Catherine!

 

End of Day Six

 


 

Day Seven part 1: Tuesday, 3rd September 2019, Marabá, Pará

 

A wonderful meeting with Claudelice dos Santos


• Please click on the photo above or here to see it larger.

Leaving for Belém



• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 57 photos of the flight from Marabá to Belém. Gaby and Evelin attempt to take the overland bus whenever possible and try to avoid flying as much as possible. On this flight, several other human behaviours were visible that are destructive for the environment: 1. clean 'bio-water' is being served, however, in plastic that is not 'clean', 2. from the air it is very visible how the degradation of the Rainforest starts with roads and small patches that are cleared for agribusiness.

End of the Marabá part of the conference

 

 

Caravan of Dignity Dialogues in Belém
3rd September – 7th September 2019

(Explanation of the Dignity + Dialogue format = Dignilogue)

Day Seven part 2: Tuesday, 3rd September 2019, Belém, Pará

 

Arrival in Belém: Gateway to the riches of the Amazon

Our dear Gaby had to leave us here, she had to proceed to São Paulo. Thank you, dear Gaby! What would we have done without YOU!!! We are in deep gratitude!


• Please click on the photo above or here to see all photos of the little shop in the airport of Belém that gave a good overview over the riches of the Amazon.
You see Gaby on the picture above in front of a variety of 'bombons' (fruit in chocolate). These are the different fruits:

Cupuaçu (Theobroma grandiflorum), commonly known as cupuaçu, also spelled cupuassu, cupuazú, cupu assu, or copoasu, is a tropical rainforest tree related to cacao. Common throughout the Amazon basin, it is cultivated in the jungles of Colombia, Bolivia and Peru and in the north of Brasil, with the largest production in Pará. The pulp of the cupuaçu fruit is consumed throughout Central and South America, is the national fruit of Brasil, and is used to make ice creams, snack bars, and other products.

The açaí palm, from Tupi-Guarani asaí, Euterpe oleracea, is a species of palm tree (Arecaceae) cultivated for its fruit (açaí berries, or simply açaí), hearts of palm (a vegetable), leaves, and trunk wood. Global demand for the fruit expanded rapidly in the 21st century and so the tree is cultivated for that purpose primarily. The species is native to Brasil, Peru, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago, mainly in swamps and floodplains. Açaí palms are tall, slender trees growing to more than 25 m (82 ft) tall, with pinnate leaves up to 3 m (9.8 ft) long. The fruit is small, round, and black-purple in color. The fruit became a staple food in floodplain areas around the 18th century, but its consumption in urban areas and recognition as a health food only began in the mid 1990s along with the popularisation of other Amazonian fruits outside the region.

Paraense (cacao, Theobroma cacao), also called the cacao tree and the cocoa tree, is a small (4–8 m (13–26 ft) tall) evergreen tree in the family Malvaceae, native to the deep tropical regions of the Americas. Its seeds, cocoa beans, are used to make chocolate liquor, cocoa solids, cocoa butter and chocolate.

The brigadeiro is a traditional Brazilian dessert, created by a confectioner from Rio de Janeiro, Heloisa Nabuco de Oliveira. It is made of condensed milk, cocoa powder, butter, and chocolate sprinkles covering the outside layer.

Tapereba (Spondias mombin, or hog plum), also known as yellow mombin or hog plum is a species a tree and flowering plant in the family Anacardiaceae. It is native to the tropical Americas, including the West Indies. The tree was introduced by the Portuguese in South Asia in the beginning of the XVII century. It has been naturalised in parts of Africa, India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, The Bahamas, Indonesia, and other Caribbean islands. It is rarely cultivated except in parts of the Brazilian Northeast.

Muruci (Byrsonima crassifolia) is a species of flowering plant bearing fruit in the acerola family, Malpighiaceae, that is native to tropical America. Common names include changunga, muruci, murici, nanche, nance, nancite, chacunga, craboo, kraabu, savanna serrette (or savanna serret) and golden spoon. In Jamaica it is called hogberry (plural hogberries). It's valued for its small (between one, and one and a quarter centimeter in diameter) round, sweet yellow fruit which is strongly scented. The fruits have a very pungent and distinct flavour and smell. The taste is not comparable to any other fruit.

Bacuri (Platonia Platonia insignis), the sole species of the genus Platonia, is a tree of the family Clusiaceae native to South America in the humid forests of Brasil, Paraguay, parts of Colombia and northeast to Guyana; specially in Amazon Rainforest. Common names include bacuri (and numerous variant spellings thereof; bacurí, bacury, bakuri, pacuri, pakuri, pakouri, packoeri, pakoeri), maniballi, naranjillo and bacurizeiro. There was a degree of nomenclatural confusion, caused by Moronobea esculenta. If that were validly published for this species the current name would be Platonia esculenta. It was established that Moronobea esculenta is not a formal name (not "validly published"), so the name remains Platonia insignis.

Castanha do Pará The Brasil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) is a South American tree in the family Lecythidaceae, and also the name of the tree's commercially harvested edible seeds. Despite their name, the most significant exporter of Brasil nuts is not Brasil but Bolivia, where they are called castañas de Brasil, nuez de Brasil or castañas de Pando ('chestnuts from Pando'). In Brasil, these nuts are called castanhas-do-pará (literally 'chestnuts from Pará'), but Acreans call them castanhas-do-acre instead. Indigenous names include juvia in the Orinoco area. In Cuba, the nut is alternatively called coquito de Santiago, literally St. James coconut.

 

Belém: Gateway to the riches of the Amazon



• Please click on the photos above or here to see all photos of the little shop in the airport of Belém that gives a good overview over the riches of the Amazon. Fortunately, not everything is in plastic bottles, there are also some glass containers, for example, with Jambu, and with Pimenta de cheiro:

Jambu, or acmella oleracea is a species of flowering herb in the family Asteraceae. Common names include toothache plant, paracress, Sichuan buttons, buzz buttons, tingflowers and electric daisy. Its native distribution is unclear, but it is likely derived from a Brazilian Acmella species. It is grown as an ornamental and attracts fireflies when in bloom. It is used as a medicinal remedy in various parts of the world. A small, erect plant, it grows quickly and bears gold and red inflorescences. It is frost-sensitive but perennial in warmer climates.

Pimenta de cheiro: No Brasil, existe a variedade conhecida popularmente como pimenta-murupi, cultivada nos estados do Amazonas e Pará. É uma pimenta pequena, amarela, dividida em gomos e com formato alongado. É a pimenta brasileira mais forte.. Os cultivares da C. chinense são ainda conhecidas no Brasil como pimenta de cheiro e pimenta de bode (bodinha em algumas regiões), consideradas variedades botânicas ou um dos grupos varietais, com características de frutos bem definidas. Engilsh (Google translator): In Brasil, there is the variety popularly known as murupi pepper, cultivated in the states of Amazonas and Pará. It is a small, yellow pepper, divided into buds and with an elongated shape. It is the strongest Brazilian pepper. C. chinense cultivars are still known in Brasil as sweet pepper and goat pepper (bodinha in some regions), considered botanical varieties or one of the varietal groups, with well-defined fruit characteristics.

 

Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet

Sandro met us in the Belem Soft Hotel where we co-created the programme for the next days (612 Braz de Aguiar Boulevard, Centro, Nazaré, Belém, PA, 66.035-000).


• Please click on the photo above to see it larger. Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet was brought to us by Dan Baron, and he became our wonderful host and mentor in Belém. On the website of his Instituto Humana there is a description of the values that guide his work: 'The values that inspire us ... are dedication and enthusiasm at work, organisation, transparency, care, and rational use in the treatment of available human and material resources'. See also a film about his work that Sandro shared with us.

Kamolrat Intaratat and her colleague Piyachat came all the way from Thailand to the Amazon


• Please click on the photo above to see it larger. Our dear Kjell Skyllstad brought Kamolrat Intaratat to us. She travelled for 42 hours, together with her colleagues Piyachat, all the way from Bangkok to the Amazon. They would have liked to come for the first part of the conference in Marabá, but due to limitations from their university, they could only come from the 3rd until the 7th of September. Kamolrat is the director and founder of the Research Center of Communication and Development Knowledge Management (CCDKM) at the Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University (STOU) in Nonthaburi, in the northern outskirts of Bangkok in Thailand. She is also the Chair of the Communication Arts for ASEAN International Program (Master Degree Program).


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 10 photos of our first meeting in the Belém part of our conference. You see Kamolrat, Sandro, Gaby (soon to leave us), Piyachat and Evelin. In the lobby of the hotel, where we met, there was a big cow...


• Please click on the photos above to see them larger. Sandro brought us to the famous Cathedral of Belém, Our Lady of Grace Cathedral. On the second Sunday in October, Pará celebrates the largest religious event in Brasil: the procession of the Círio of Nazaré (picture in the middle): 'This tradition started when a farmer and lumberman called Plácido José de Souza found an image of the Virgin and Child on the edge of the Murucutu creek, where the Basilica of Our Lady of Nazareth of Exile stands today. He decided to take the image home. However, the image would mysteriously go back to the place where it was initially found every time he took it home. So Plácido decided to build a small chapel on the edge of the creek. This episode was regarded as miraculous throughout the region. It attracted hundreds of believers to see the image and pay homage to it'. The picture on the right side shows a poster displayed in the church, proof that the Catholic Church uses the latest environmentally friendly technology. We learned that the Catholic Church is well organised (in contrast to many evangelical communities).



• Please click on the photos of the Forte do Castelo de Belém above to see them larger. Wikipedia: 'In 1615, Portuguese captain-general Francisco Caldeira Castelo Branco of the captaincy of Bahia commanded a military expedition sent by the Governor General of Brasil to check the trading excursions of foreigners (French, Dutch, English) up the river (Amazon) from the Cabo do Norte in Grão Pará. On January 12, 1616, he anchored in what is now known as Guajará Bay, formed by the confluence of the Para and Guama Rivers, called by the Tupinambás, Guaçu Paraná'. ... He built a wooden fort, covered with straw, which he called 'Presépio' (nativity scene), now known as 'Forte do Castelo'. The colony formed by the fort was given the name Feliz Lusitânia, 'Happy Lusitania'. It was the embryo of the future city of Belém. The fort failed to suppress Dutch and French trading, but did ward off colonization'.

End of Day Seven

 

 

Day Eight: Wedesday, 4th September 2019, Belém, Pará

 

We started the day at the Universidade Federal do Pará, UFPA

The Federal University of Pará (Portuguese: Universidade Federal do Pará, UFPA) is one of the three public universities maintained by the Brazilian federal government in the Amazonian State of Pará. ... The university has over 40,000 students enrolled in its courses, which are offered across its many campuses in the cities of Belém, Abaetetuba, Altamira, Ananindeua, Bragança, Castanhal, Cametá, Capanema, Breves, Tucuruí and Soure. Among UFPA research teams, there are many nationally recognized groups, particularly in the fields of genetics, parasitology, tropical diseases and geosciences. The Federal University of Pará is the largest university in the North region of Brasil by enrollment and is a reference in the areas of Biomedical Sciences and Biology research, this last one mainly because of the Amazon Rainforest.



• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 20 photos of our visit to the Federal University of Pará (UFPA). Briefly, we dropped in at the 42º Congresso Brasileiro de Ciências da Comunicação 'Fluxos comunicacionais e crise da democracia' / 42nd Brazilian Congress of Communication Sciences 'Communication flows and crisis of democracy'. We were very impressed by the posters a group of young students had created (among them Tatiana Araujo!). The book tabe was astonishing: Rosa Luxemburg, Hegel...

On our way to Ilha Mosqueira with Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet

Mosqueiro is an island near the south bank of the Pará River in the Amazonian State of Pará. 'Since July 6, 1989, the northwest coast of the island has comprised an administrative district of the city of Belém, roughly 67 km (42 mi) north of the downtown area of the city. The island has 17 km (11 mi) of beaches with freshwater tides, which draw vacationers primarily in the dry season. The largest settlement on the island is the town of Vila (often referred to simply as Mosqueiro) on the westernmost part of the island'.


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 95 photos of our journey to the Instituto Humana on Mosqueiro Island. We witnessed a strike of motocycle taxi drivers (see the photo on the left side). We saw one of the beaches (see the photo on the right side), and many shops advertising açaí. Evelin Lindner's reflections on the houses alongside the road: 'How sad that houses look exactly alike all around the globe now: Boxes of concrete columns filled with bricks. If I had a magic wand, I would replace all these buildings over night with local architecture...'.

Visit to an organic farm, with Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 7 photos of the organic farm, Sandro brought us to.

The Instituto Humana of Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet

Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet, Directeur général at Humana Comunicação & Tradução, and Director at HUMANA COM & TRAD, Ilha de Mosqueiro, Belém, Pará, Amazon, Brasil

Have a look at two videos:
24 Instituto Humana, film by Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet
25 Encontre e conecte! Please Meet and Connect! Evelin Lindner's contribution



• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 12 photos offered to us by Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet to introduce his Instituto Humana to us. Please see the wonderful film that Sandro created about his work.



• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 29 photos of the wonderful time Kamolrat, Piyachat, and Evelin had in the Instituto Humana of Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet. Plese see the video-recording of Evelin Lindner's contribution to this conference, titled 'Encontre e conecte! Please Meet and Connect!', and Kamolrat Intaratat's contribution (recorded on 7th September).

Thank you, dear Sandro and Marlucia, for welcoming us in your paradise in the Amazon Rainforest, surrounded by wonderful vegetation, by monkeys, iguanas, birds, tucanos, parrots, and many other animals. As Marlucia, Sandro's wife, said (paraphrased): 'What makes this place a paradise is exactly what those people don't want to have who destroy it and burn it...'


Iguana is a genus of herbivorous lizards that are native to tropical areas of Mexico, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean.

Toucans are members of the Neotropical near passerine bird family Ramphastidae. The Ramphastidae are most closely related to the American barbets. They are brightly marked and have large, often-colorful bills.

 

End of Day Eight

 


 

Day Nine: Thursday, 5th September 2019, Amazon Day, Belém, Pará

These are the videos recorded on this day:
27 The Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi in Belém
28 The Kayapo people presented in the Museu Goeldi
29 The Amazon Day conference at the Museu Goeldi: Ima Celia Guimaraes Vieira
30 The Amazon Day conference at the Museu Goeldi: Marlucia Bonifácio Martins
31 The Amazon Day conference at the Museu Goeldi: Denny Moore
32 The Amazon Day conference at the Museu Goeldi: Closing dialogues
33 Interview with Marlucia Martins on the Amazon Day 2019
34 The Amazon Day at the Parliament of Pará State in Belém: Deputado Dirceu Ten Caten invited Evelin Lindner

The Instituto Humana of Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet in the Recanto da Preguiça / Lazy Sloth Corner


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 7 photos of the wonderful time Kamolrat, Piyachat, and Evelin had in the Instituto Humana of Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet. The institute is located in the Recanto da Preguiça / Lazy Sloth Corner, the home of Sandro and his amazing wife Marlucia.

Sloths are arboreal mammals noted for slowness of movement and for spending most of their lives hanging upside down in the trees of the tropical rain forests of South America and Central America. The six species are in two families: two-toed sloths and three-toed sloths. Despite this traditional naming, all sloths actually have three toes on each rear limb, although two-toed sloths have two digits on each forelimb.


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 4 photos of our journey to Belém in the early morning to avoid the rush hour. Evelin Lindner's reflections: If I had a magic wand, I would make all those ‘modern cities’ disappear over night and replace them with something more locally appriopriate. To me, this global style of high rise boxes is horrendously ugly and inhumane, its uniformity destroys the world’s diversity of traditional materials and styles, it rapes local landscapes, and it is unfeasible for most local climates. This global obsession with imitating the supposedy ‘wealthy’ parts of the world, to me, is one of the many expressions of systemic humiliation, of systemic ecocide and sociocide. Where is our local pride, I want to ask all those people who plan for such buildings. Please, forget about notions such as ‘developed world’, I want to beg everyone, because it is a short-sighted development built on unsustainable exploitation. The Amazon Rainforest is such a miraculously complex system, and people who know how to live within it sustainably, THEY are the ones who are truly developed...


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 3 photos of Marlucia's breakfast in Belém. Brazilian tapioca is even better here in Belém than in Marabá! And the shy woman who came with her cooling bag to sell 'bombons', had something to offer that would make first class chefs around the world envious: her home-made bombons were much better than even those the fancy shop at Belém airport had to offer...


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 13 photos of the streets of Belém. Evelin Lindner's reflections: 'Again, as everywhere else in the world, also here I see this global uniformity, high rise buildings that are supposed to impress with their "modernity" but elicit sadness and resignation. As everywhere else, they usually are already dilapidated when new, and the ubiquitous "cable salad" laughs at them. Where is the city I hope for? Where is the city that is truly future-oriented, that expresses dignified and dignifying unity in diversity, where is the city that nourishes, rather than be exploitative? The refugees from Venezuela standing at the side of the streets in Belém, with large hand-painted signs made from card-board saying "I am Venezuelan", they can speak to the horror, fear, and despair that befalls even the richest city in a matter of a few days when three things fail, when (1) electricity and (2) water are cut and (3) the shops are looted. This is what happened in the once 'wealthy' oil town of Maracaibo in March 2019'.

The Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi in Belém


• Please click on the photos above to see them larger. You see the Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi, a Brazilian research institution and museum located in the city of Belém. The institution has the mission of researching, cataloging and analysing the biological and sociocultural diversity of the Amazon Basin, contributing to its cultural memory and its regional development. It has also the aim of increasing public awareness of science in the Amazon by means of its museums, its botanical garden, its zoological park, etc. The Museum maintains a scientific research station in the high Amazon forest (Estação Científica Ferreira Penna), which was inaugurated in 1993, with 330 square kilometres (130 sq mi) in the Caxiuanã National Forest, municipality of Melgaço, Pará.
On the picture on the right above, you see Alexandre B. Bonaldo, head of the Department of Coordenação de Zoologia of the Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi, the 'boss' of ecologist Marlucia Bonifácio Martins.


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 25 photos of the Museu Goeldi's efforts to make the significance of the Amazon Rainforest visible. You see an overview over the degradation of the forest, as well as over the deforestation, and you understand that it is impossible to replant the original forest, as it does not simply consist of trees, but is a complex system of plants and animals. On the picture on the right, you see the human-made plastic pollution exhibited.


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 12 photos of the Kayapo exhibition in the Museu Goeldi. See also the video recording of the great explanations of our guide. The Kayapo people are indigenous peoples in Brasil who inhabit a vast area spreading across the states of Pará and Mato Grosso, south of the Amazon Basin and along Rio Xingu and its tributaries... They are one of the various subgroups of the great Mebêngôkre nation (people from the water’s source). The term "Kayapo" is used by neighbouring groups rather than the Kayapo themselves. They refer to outsiders as "Poanjos".

See this little video, where the wonderful guide in the Museu Goeldi explained that wasps and bees were very important for the Kayapo. Long time ago, there was a war between the humans and the insects. But the humans could not overcome the insects because the king beetle was too smart. (The king beetle is the Actaeon beetle, see it on the picture on the right above, one of the largest of all beetles, whose males can grow to be 131/2 centimeters long by 4 centimeters thick). Humans were finally victorious when they learned from the bees to organise a society, and from the wasps and their sting how to get weaponised: in this way, they could overcome the king beetle!
Then the guide explained the Kayapo theory of diseases: They perceive two kinds, first, diseases caused by spirits, which are not curable, and, second, simple discomforts, such as stomach ache, which can be cured by plants. They even had contraceptives!

Dia da Amazônia, mesa redonda 'Amazônia em chamas. Quais as consequências?'


• Please click above on the poster of the mesa redonda / round table on the Dia da Amazônia / the Amazon Day, titled 'Amazônia em chamas. Quais as consequências?' / 'The Amazon in flames. What are the consequences?' with Dra. Ima Vieira, Dr. Denny Moore, and Dra. Martins. Venue: Rocinha, in the Parque Zoobotânico of the Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi.

This was a spontaneously called conference, due to the emergency in the Amazon, with the following three speakers:

Dr. Ima Celia Guimaraes Vieira, Senior Researcher at the Department Coordenação de Botânica (CBO) at the Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi. See a video recording of her contribution to the Dia da Amazônia conference (sorry for the poor quality of Evelin Lindner's recording, as she filmed from an unfortunate angle).

Dr. Marlucia Bonifácio Martins, ecologist, Department of Coordenação de Zoologia of the Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi. See a video recording of her contribution to the Dia da Amazônia conference (sorry for the poor quality of Evelin Lindner's recording, as she filmed from an unfortunate angle).

Dr. Denny Moore (born 1944) is an American linguist, and anthropologist. He graduated from the University of Michigan, and from the City University of New York with a Ph.D. in Anthropology. He has worked for the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development, and is Coordinator of the Linguistics Division, Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi, Belem-Para, Brasil. He published a grammar of Gavião, a Brazilian Amazonian language. He is on the advisory board of the Center for Amazon Community Ecology.

Closing dialogues of the mesa redonda 'Amazônia em chamas. Quais as consequências?'
See a video recording (sorry for the poor quality of Evelin Lindner's recording, as she filmed from an unfortunate angle).

 

Interview with Marlucia Bonifácio Martins

After the conference, Marlucia Martins was interviewed in the park of the museum, see the video:


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all photos of the interview with Marlucia Martins, and click here to see the video. On the photos on the right side, you see her produly sitting in front of the funders of the Museu Goeldi: Ernst Lohse, Andreas Goeldi, Rodolpho Rodrigues, Jacques Huber, Oscar Martins, Emília Snethlage, Abigayl Mattos, Emil Göldi, Anna Carreira.

Lunch in the Resto do Parque


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 13 photos of one of the best restaurants of Belém, Resto do Parque, and its surroundings. Thank you, dear Sandro and Marlucia, for bringing Kamolrat, Piyachat and Evelin to this lovely place!

On our way to the Palaco Cabanagem



• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 17 photos of our way through the streets of Belém to the Palaco Cabanagem, seat of the Legislative Assembly of the State of Pará (Portuguese: Assembleia Legislativa do Estado do Pará), the unicameral legislature of Pará State in Brasil. It has 41 state deputies elected by proportional representation. The first legislature began in 13th March 1885 in a palace where today is the Square Dom Pedro II (destroyed by a fire in 1959), and it was moved in 1960 to the Teatro da Paz and in 1970 to the current headquarters, the Palácio Cabanagem.

The Cabanagem (1835–1840) was a popular revolution and pro-separatist movement that occurred in the then-state of Grão-Pará, Empire of Brasil. Among the causes for this revolt were the extreme poverty of the Paraense people, oppression by the Empire of Brasil, and the political irrelevance to which the province was relegated after the independence of Brasil. The Cabanagem Memorial by Oscar Niemeyer commemorates the revolt. Translated from the Portuguese Wikipedia site: 'The Cabanagem Memorial, according to Niemeyer's conception, represents the heroic struggle of the Caban people, which was one of the most important movements in all of Brasil. The elevated ramp towards the firmament represents the grandeur of the popular revolt that came very close to achieving its objectives and the "fracture" alludes to the breakdown of the revolutionary process. But although it has been stifled, Cabanagem remains alive in the memory of the people, so the block continues to rise to infinity, symbolising that the essence, ideals and hot struggle remain latent in the country's history'.
Who knows, we may ask, perhaps this is why the governor of Pará did not agree with president Jair Bolsonaro in their August meeting?

The Amazon Day with Deputado Dirceu Ten Caten


Dirceu Ten Caten, now 29 years old, is a Congressman / Deputado in the Legislative Assembly of the State of Pará / Assembleia Legislativa do Estado do Pará ALEPA in Belém, the capital of the Amazonian State of Pará. He was introduced to our Human Dignity group by Dan Baron as a hopeful future presidental candidate for Brasil, as someone who can merge social justice with ecological sustainability. Dirceu Ten Caten was born in Marabá in 1989, graduated in law from CESUPA - Centro Universitário do Pará, and is a post-graduate in Public Law from LFG and in Public Policy Management from Unicamp / SP (Universidade Estadual de Campinas / The University of Campinas, commonly called Unicamp, is a public research university in the state of São Paulo, consistently ranked among the top universities in Brasil and Latin America). He started his activism in politics at the age of 14 in a youth ministry in Marabá, with 15 he was a regional coordinator of PSCB (Socialist Cabocla Youth of Pará), in 2012 he founded Cajum (Youth House of Marabá), an NGO of vocational training for youth in the municipality and region. Read more about him on the site of the parliament, on Facebook, or on the site of the Labour Party. See also (translated from Portuguese): 'In 2014, Deputy Dirceu was elected with almost 33,000 votes of confidence and re-elected in 2018 with 59,600 votes in 140 municipalities in Pará. After the two elections, Dirceu made a point of returning to the municipalities to thank them for each vote obtained in the state elections. After two years in office, Dirceu visited all the municipalities under the Bote fé mandate ('have faith') to render public accountability of his work, providing the population with full transparency of his actions in the state parliament and a de facto democratic and participatory mandate'.


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 13 photos of the Dia da Amazônia event with Deputado Dirceu Ten Caten. Dirceu Ten Caten kindly invited Evelin Lindner to speak, and Sandro Ruggeri translated. Congratulations, dear Dirceu, for your future-oriented vision, where you bring together concern for the environment with concern for the weak in society!

Please click on the left side to see the official video recording of the entire event of almost three hours on Facebook in large format (or cell phone format).
Please click on the right side to see the section that Evelin Lindner edited out from the large recording. Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet was the translator. Evelin tried to make the same point as in the City Hall of Marabá on 28th August: The Amazon has a sort of wealth that those parts of the world that are called 'wealthy' have lost, namely, the knowledge to live sustainably in complex systems such as the Rainforest. Therefore: 'What is progress? What is a 'developed' country? What is 'wealth'? Evelin reported that many people in the West are oblivious of the fact that their governments create problems with their right hand that the same government then laments by wringing its the left hand when the damage becomes visible. In other words, on one side, governments fire up under exploitation, for instance, through making trade agreements with inappropriate conditions, and then they are surprised by the damage that unfolds, and, on top of that, they expect that the victims will solve the problem. This is double humiliation... A much more holistic approach is needed!

Evelin reported that many people in the West are oblivious of the fact that their governments create problems with their right hand that the same government then laments by wringing its left hand when the damage becomes visible. In other words, on one side, governments fire up under exploitation, for instance, through making trade agreements with inappropriate conditions, and then they are surprised by the damage that unfolds, and, on top of that, they expect that the victims will solve the problem. This is double humiliation... A much more holistic approach is needed! See, among others, This was the situation in the Amazon, seen from Europe in July 2019: 'Brasil Continues to Destroy the Rainforest – But Resistance Is Growing' (Pdf) is an article that was published in Germany in July 2019, explaining how the forest is cut and telling the story of a small indigenous group who vows to resist. It does not mention European drivers of this destruction, such as the EU-Mercosur agreement. The article misleads the European reader to believe that the problem can be solved within Brasil. The European reader remains unaware that European interests work as an amplifier of the problem. Indeed, the problem did not get smaller after July, on the contrary, it got much worse, as fires were started everywhere on 10th August.
'Global NGOs: Dirty Dozen Companies Driving Deforestation Must Act Now to Stop the Burning of the World's Forests', Amazon Watch, 30th August 2019: Groups call for the immediate suspension of all business and financing with traders active in the Brazilian Amazon: 'The Amazon is on fire. Corporations share the blame. They need to become part of the solution'.

 

In the evening, through the centre of Belém


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 5 photos of the centre of Belém

End of Day Nine

 


 

Day Ten: Friday, 6th September 2019, Combú, Pará

 

This was an all-day excursion to the island of Combú across the river Guarná from Belém

These were the videos we made on this day:
35 On the way to Combú island
36 Flavia of the Saldosa Maloca restaurant on Combú island
37 Aline Voos on Combú island explaining Andiroba
38 Evelin Lindner on Combú island
39 Vitor Nascimento explains the 'Street River' graffiti project

Ilha do Combú, the island of Combú, leaving Belém behind!


• Please click here to see the pictures above larger. Combú island is 15 minutes by boat across the Guamá river from Belém. It was almost unreal for us to keep in mind that the Amazon Rainforest was burning further southwest while we enjoyed the unbelievable beauty and richness of the Amazon Rainforest here. Our sadness increased at the fact that there are people out there who strive to destroy these riches so that a few can increase their profit margin.

Vitor Nascimento was our wonderful host and mentor


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 93 photos of the boat journey to the island of Combú that Kamolrat Intaratat and Piyachat from Thailand undertook together with Evelin Lindner, under the guidance and mentorship of Vitor Nascimento. Please see also the small video we made of our journey.

Vitor is 29 years old and knows everyone on Combú island. He apologised that he is not a professional tourist guide, and we whole-heartedly thanked him for not being a professional guide. We told him that some members of our network had just been in Alaska and had been disgusted by the fakeness of the tourist guides there, how they faked authenticity with the aim to entertain the tourists. We told Vitor about the toxic ‘touristification’ of many places of beauty around the world. We told him that we do not believe in the kind of tourism where privileged people treat locals like in a zoo and nature like a leisure park. We told him that we believe in equal dignity of all people and how honoured and privileged we feel to meet him. We told him that we want to be with him as a fellow human being and friend, rather than treat him as a provider of services to customers. The last thing we want is to be ‘customers’, ‘clients’, or ‘tourists’, the last thing we want is to ‘consume’ his kindness as if it were a thing. This, for us, would be utter humiliation, humiliation of him and of us.


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 21 photos of the chocolate atelier on the island of Combú, where we were impressed by the many signs of ecological awareness. What a great architecture! Why do not all new housing projects in Belém take their inspiration here?

The Saldosa Maloca restaurant



• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 38 photos of the Saldosa Maloca restaurant on the island of Combú.

Evelins shared her reflections: Look at its architecture: local material is being used, and the result is immensely beautiful, in contrast to the concrete blocks in Belém. I hear sceptics counter: ‘But, with these local materials you cannot build high rise buildings!’ I know this debate only too well from my time in Egypt, a country that was blessed with a genial architect, Hassan Fathy, who had re-introduced the pharaonic architecture with lime stone and mudbrick. Sanaa in Yemen shows that this kind of architecture can create buildings that have several floors. Yet, this architecture is not what we see being realised. What we see, instead, are investors seeking opportunities, they get a piece of land, and a building with more floors will render more profit than a building with less floors. The investor will hire an architect who has some prototypes in the drawer of his office, which he will then multiply, so as to deliver a mass produced building or a mass-produced composite of buildings, so ugly and impersonal that not the investor himself nor the architect would ever voluntarily want to live in them themselves.

After admiring the beautiful architecture, the organic herb garden, the biogas plant, and the lovely baskets for the separation of waste, please see also the small videos we made:

Please watch the short video with Flavia Saldosa Maloca restaurant on Combú island.

This is Aline Voos, a visitor to Combú island, who kindly took it upon her to explain Andiroba to Evelin Lindner. Please watch the short video.

Ubuçu is a very common palm in the Brazilian Amazon being found on the banks of the floodplains mainly in the states of Amazonas, Pará, and Amapá. The stem of this palm reaches 3 to 5 meters high and 3 centimeters thick. The leaves reach 5 to 7 meters in length and they stay in the stem after they dry. People living along the river use its leaves to cover houses to protect them from the rain and the sun. The tough, flexible natural vegetable fibers that surround the fruits of the palm tree are what is called Tururi. These fibers are widely used in the making of crafts and fashion utilities. Before use, the fiber undergoes a softening process by washing in running water to remove impurities. Its natural colour is dark brown. See the Tururi that Evelin bought on the left side and a short video showing the palm tree and the leaves on the right side.

Please watch the short video, where Evelin Lindner tries to express her sadness about the fact that others strive to destroy these riches so that a few can increase their profit margin. Evelin is almost afraid to show this paradisiac place to the world in this video, because not only flames can destroy a place, mass tourism has turned out to be destructive, too.

 

The 'Street River' graffiti project


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 10 photos of the 'Street River' graffiti project on the island of Combú.

Please watch this short video, where Vitor Nascimento explains the 'Street River' graffiti project, the first open-air art gallery within the Amazon. The 'Street River' project is a non-profit project that uses art as a transformation tool in a practical ways. It invited 10 artists from all over Brasil to portray riverside life in the Amazonian region together with the people living there and they recorded this in a documentary. See 'Arte & Design: A 1ª galeria de arte a céu aberto da Amazônia', Evandro Pimentel, Red Bull, 19 Julho 2017.

 

End of Day Ten

 


Day Eleven: Saturday, 7th September 2019, Belém, Pará


Kamolrat Intaratat explained her work


• Please click on the photo or here to see the video where Kamolrat Intaratat explains her work with the Research Center of Communication and Development Knowledge Management. Our dear Kjell Skyllstad brought Kamolrat Intaratat to us. She travelled for 42 hours, together with her colleagues Piyachat, all the way from Bangkok to the Amazon. Kamolrat is the director and founder of the Research Center of Communication and Development Knowledge Management (CCDKM) at the Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University (STOU) in Nonthaburi, in the northern outskirts of Bangkok in Thailand. She is also the Chair of the Communication Arts for ASEAN International Program (Master Degree Program).

End of Day Eleven

 


 

Post-conference experiences and reflections by Evelin Lindner

These were the two videos that Evelin Lindner made after the conference:
41 Praça da República in Belém
42 Mercado Ver-o-peso in Belém
See also Roteiro Geo-Turístico da UFPA - Ver-o-Peso / Centro Histórico, 9th November 2019, Del Lagre Roteiros Geo-Turísticos da UFPA, Roteiro Geo-Turístico da UFPA dentro da programação do III Seminário Internacional de Turismo, Patrimônio e Politicas Públicas - Diversidade e perspectivas da pesquisa franco-brasileira - NAEA / UFPA. Parada na Praça do Pescador. Resultado de um esforço em conjunto, cooperativo e colaborativo.

Circle of Love Gifts

Evelin Lindner explains the 'Circle of Love Gifts: In our global dignity network, we create ‘circles of love gifts’. It means that people on one continent give small gifts for other members of our global fellowship on another continent. I carry these gifts with me, take a picture of the giver and the receiver and connect them by email, so that not just my life is a bridge-building life, also these gifts become bridge-building gifts. When time is too short, I sometimes also buy gifts – small unexpensive light-weight gifts – and, of course, I avoid high-flying souvernir shops, as in touristic places, many of the items sold are now mass-produced in China anyway. So, I look for people who make things themselves, and I look for household items that might be considered ‘normal’ on one continent but may be highly educational for people on another continent. I never just buy things, rather, I attempt to forge relationships with people, and I try to understand the source and the use of particular items in the lives of local people.
Each gift has a story, and thus these gift collections also serve to give tangible substance to my global living project.
Usually, I live with a family and avoid the social-psychological distance that is created by staying in hotels. Rather than filling my suitcase with my clothes, I fill it with gifts and wear the clothes of the people I live with. In this way, it is as if I get into the skin of my new home, it is also a way to express respect for my hosts, and by doing so I become a humble family member.

This was the reason why I went to the Praça da República on the 8th of September, and the Ver-o-peso market on the 9th September. Of course, I asked for permission to take pictures or make little videos.

Praça da República

in Belém, 8th September 2019



• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 18 photos of the Praça da República in Belém. You can also see a brief video. On the left side you see the kind woman who gave me all her creative hair clips. In the middle you see Cheiro do Pará. On the right side you see a lovely woman with a feather hair dress. I was very happy to find some of the jewellery made of golden grass or capim dourado (Syngonanthus nitens) and buriti fibers (from the Moriche Palm) again, as signs of love from the Amazon for our network members in Europe and America. See the picture on the right from my time in the Amazon in 2012.

About the Praça da República, translated from the Portuguese Wikipedia site: 'At first it was Largo da Campina, a huge open land that was between the Campina neighborhood and the road that led to the chapel of Nossa Senhora de Nazaré. Then, in the eighteenth century, there was built a huge warehouse to store gunpowder, tracing its name to Largo da Póvora. A gallows has been erected, but there is no record of any hanging. What is known is that the space was used to bury, in a shallow grave, slaves and the poor... Today Praça da República becomes the ideal stage for major celebrations such as the Círio de Nazaré, Race Day and the September 7 parade. The other 362 days of the year make it the ideal place for family outings, evangelism, meeting friends or dating'.

The Ver-o-peso market in Belém, 9th September 2019


• Please click on the photos above to see it larger.

Wikipedia: Ver-o-peso market is a market hall in Belém, Brasil located at Guajará Bay riverside. It is called "Ver-o-Peso" following a colonial era tradition, since the tax collector's main post was located there, which was called "Casa do Haver-o-peso" ("Have-the-Weight House"). It was in the "Haver-o-peso house" that the taxes over goods brought from the Amazon forests, rivers and countryside should be paid to the Portuguese crown, but only after their weight was measured, hence the name, which later suffered a contraction. Nowadays, the Ver-o-peso complex contains the Açaí Fair, a free open market where açaí berry merchants sell the fruit in natura for açaí juice shops, the Clock Square, with an iron-cast clock tower brought from England, the Ver-o-peso docks, where native fishes from Amazon are unloaded from boats and sold fresh, the Iron Market, a gothic prefab structure where fish is sold, the Solar da Beira space, a colonial building where art expositions often take place, and the neoclassical Meat Market, across the street, with iron-cast stairs and cubicles. There's also the free market, where craftsmanship, natural essence parfums, typical food and native fruits are sold.


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 42 photos of the Ver-o-peso market in Belém on 9th September. See also the video. There you see how this kind woman explains that cheiro do Pará is a mixture of Priprioca and Patchouli.

Cyperus articulatus is an aromatic species of sedge known by the common names jointed flatsedge and priprioca.

Patchouli is a species of plant from the family Lamiaceae, commonly called the 'mint' or 'deadnettle' family. The plant grows as a bushy herb, with erect stems reaching around 75 centimetres in height and bearing small, pale pink-white flowers. It is native to tropical regions of Asia, and is now extensively cultivated in China, Indonesia, Japan, Cambodia, Myanmar, India, Maldives, Malaysia, Mauritius, Seychelles, Madagascar, Taiwan, Pakistan, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, South America and the Caribbean.

Crescentia cujete, commonly known as the Calabash Tree, is species of flowering plant that is native to Central, South America, West Indies and southern Florida. Cuia, cabaça, cabaço, coité, cuieté, cuietê, cuité and cuitê are the names given to the fruit of this tree in Portuguese.


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 42 photos of the Ver-o-peso market in Belém on 9th September. See also the video. There you see how this kind man explains the kinds of woods he uses for his handicraft, for instance, he uses the raiz (root) of the Cumarú tree in front of which we stand in this picture. He writes the following list on a piece of paper for Evelin: Cortiça, Embauba, Cumarú, Miriji (?), Taboca:

Cortiça or cork is an impermeable buoyant material, the phellem layer of bark tissue that is harvested for commercial use primarily from Quercus suber (the cork oak), which is endemic to southwest Europe and northwest Africa. Cork is composed of suberin, a hydrophobic substance. Because of its impermeable, buoyant, elastic, and fire retardant properties, it is used in a variety of products, the most common of which is wine stoppers. The montado landscape of Portugal produces approximately half of cork harvested annually worldwide, with Corticeira Amorim being the leading company in the industry.

Embauba or Cecropia is a Neotropical genus consisting of 61 recognized species with a highly distinctive lineage of dioecious trees. The genus consists of pioneer trees in the more or less humid parts of the Neotropics, with the majority of the species being myrmecophytic. ... The genus is native to the American tropics, where it is one of the most recognizable components of the rainforest.

Cumarú or Dipteryx odorata is commonly known as 'cumaru' or 'kumaru' and is a species of flowering tree in the pea family, Fabaceae. The tree is native to Central America and northern South America. Its seeds are known as tonka beans (sometimes tonkin beans or tonquin beans). They are black and wrinkled and have a smooth, brown interior. They have a strong fragrance similar to sweet woodruff (Galium odoratum) due to their high content of coumarin.

Taboca or Guadua is a Neotropical genus of thorny, clumping bamboo in the grass family, ranging from moderate to very large species. Physically, Guadua angustifolia is noted for being the largest Neotropical bamboo. The genus is similar to Bambusa and is sometimes included in that genus. Several animals are, to a various extent, associated with stands of Guadua bamboo, for example several species of seedeaters, and the Amazon and Atlantic Bamboo Rats.


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 42 photos of the Ver-o-peso market in Belém on 9th September. See also the video. There you meet Josema and can listen to his explanations of his work with the Pará nuts.

The Brasil nut tree (castanha-do-brasil, castanha-do-pará) is the only species in the monotypic genus Bertholletia. It is native to the Guianas, Venezuela, Brasil, eastern Colombia, eastern Peru, and eastern Bolivia. Brasil nut trees produce fruit almost exclusively in pristine forests, as disturbed forests lack the large-bodied bees of the genera Bombus, Centris, Epicharis, Eulaema, and Xylocopa which are the only ones capable of pollinating the tree's flowers, with different bee genera being the primary pollinators in different areas, and different times of year. Brasil nuts have been harvested from plantations, but production is low and is currently not economically viable.


• Please click on the photos above or here to see all 42 photos of the Ver-o-peso market in Belém on 9th September. See also the video. There you meet Miriam and you can listen to her explanations of the products of the Amazon.
Evelin was advised by locals that robbery even at gunpoint can happen also during day-time, and anywhere in the city, and she therefore exercised approprate caution. At the end of this video, you met Miriam, who kindly got Evelin an Uber (widely used both in Marabá and Belém) and waited with Evelin for the car to arrive in a safe place in front of a little police stand.

Evelin Lindner's reflections on 5th September 2019: 'Brasil Continues to Destroy the Rainforest – But Resistance Is Growing' is the title of an article that was published in Germany in July 2019. The title explains how the forest is cut and then tells the story of a small indigenous group who vows to resist. The title gives European readers the impression that they can lean back in the hope that the problem with the Amazon will be solved within Brasil. The European reader remains unaware that, for example, the EU-Mercosur agreement as it stands now works as an amplifier of the problem. In other words, first, we have the European Union aggravating a problem by incentivising exploitation, and when the damage of this exploitation becomes apparent, the same people hope that the exploited themselves will solve the problem. In my eyes, this represents 'double humiliation'. As we know, the problem did not get solved after the above-mentioned article appeared in July, on the contrary, the problem got much worse when massive fires were started on 10th August.

Evelin Lindner's reflections on 20th September 2019, upon returning to Germany to take care of her aged father: Germany is a culture shock for me now. Today, I went past a tourist shop called 'holiday-land'. I thought: Here, the 'world house' is on fire, and every hand is needed to contain the fire even though some rooms in the house – such as Germany – are still relatively unaffected. The people in that room are hard-working people, however, they seem oblivious of the fact that many of their 'jobs' contribute to the fire (the production of arms, pesticides, plastic, just to name some), and that their 'normal' lives depend on exploiting others (statistically, every German citizen holds 60 slaves in the rest of the world). When asked to contribute to the containment of the fire, those hard-working people say: 'Sorry, but I am too exhausted from my job... sorry, but I need a holiday in "holiday-land"' (which is another room in the burning house that is still relatively unaffected)... My question: How can we liberate everyone from this systemic dilemma situation that almost automatically leads us all into systemic humiliation? My answer has been to dedicate my entire life to this predicament. In 2012, my answer was to write the book A Dignity Economy, yet, all this is too weak...

Evelin Lindner's reflections on 6th October 2019: International attention to the fires in the Amazon clearly had an impact. In a meeting with Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro on 27th August 2019, Mato Grosso Governor Mauro Mendes spoke about the fires and on behalf of agribusiness expansion: 'Brasil’s image is extremely important to our relations with most of our clients [in the] outside world. Sixty percent of the state’s GDP comes from exports. So when we have a problem [like the one] that happened a few days ago [with the Amazon fires] and took undesirable [international criticism], I got very worried'.
See 'State Governors Support Bolsonaro’s Amazon Mining, Agribusiness Plans', by Jenny Gonzales, Mongabay, 9th September 2019. His worries may be warranted, as 'People Are Seriously Talking About Invading Brasil to Save the Planet', by Aaron Gell, Medium, 24th September 2019.
Evelin Lindner's thoughts: What about 'invading' the Amazon with the world's students? Why not declaring the Rainforest the world's most important 'analogue university' and elevating all those people who know how to live sustainably within a complex system such as the Rainforest to be 'world dignity professors'? This is the idea of the World Dignity University initiative!
More and more students are now sceptical of brick-and-mortar universities, what about reality as university? What about the reality of the Amazon as university? The knowledge held in the Amazon is a form of wealth that so-called 'developed' countries have lost...
‘Yes, "reality as university", dearest Evelin!’ This was the reaction from our dear Linda Hartling when I shared these thoughts on our conference’s WhatsApp group. Linda continued: ‘The Amazon as university! The Earth as university!’
Our wish is for all the dignifiers of this world to hold hands! We welcome everyone who might be interested to contribute to our particular share in this effort. The website for our World Dignity University initiative was built by our esteemed Uli Spalthoff. We need a full time successor for him now! Also our Dignity Press needs new a person who can hold the threads together and nurture it full time. All what we do is entirely a labour of love, which means that we work on a shoestring budget, that nobody receives a salary, and there are no offices. For our full time positions, we would like to reach out to people with the necessary expertise who are dignifiers, who are just retired with a pension and would like to donate a number of years as a gift to humanity!
A LOVING WELCOME TO ALL!

Evelin Lindner's reflections on 9th October 2019: What shocked me most in the Amazon, is how the concept of dignity is the main battle-field also here. As everywhere in the world, I hear the adherents of industrialisation say that 'true dignity' is linked to what they deem the only 'true 'work', namely, work that is part of the world of money – for example, extracting minerals, or cutting trees for sales, as this can make the GDP go up. (You see the same argument also in this documentary: Who is Protecting our Forests?, Arte, 2018).
What is overlooked is that the GDP does not measure dignity. The GDP can go up also when dignity is being destroyed. True dignity, and true 'work', to me, is what people do when they live in dialogue with the Rainforest, rather than destroying it for short-term profit. We all know that saying: ‘When the Last Tree Is Cut Down, the Last Fish Eaten, and the Last Stream Poisoned, You Will Realize That You Cannot Eat Money’.

A Summary of Evelin Lindner's impressions during the 2019 Dignity Conference in the Amazon, 10th October 2019
In this video, Evelin Lindner tries to summarise her impressions and reflections in the Amazonian State of Pará from 26th August to 10th September 2019. She created this video after the 33rd Annual Dignity Conference had ended, of which she was one of the conveners. The conference took place in Marabá and Belém from 29th August to 7th September 2019, and was accompanied by a global WhatsApp group. Please be aware that this video has been brought together using very basic software. It is kept 'unlisted' to protect the privacy of the people who are included.


This is a film shared by biologist Cristiane da Cunha with our WhatsApp group


Encontro das Águas, is a film published on 9th October 2019 and sent to us by biologist Cristiane da Cunha.
This is the Portuguese text:
Socializar informações e estudos referentes aos empreendimentos em construção, operação ou previstos para os rios Juruena, Teles Pires e Tapajós, e construir uma pauta comum de resistência à esses grandes projetos. Esses foram os objetivos do Encontro das Águas que aconteceu de 14 a 16 de junho, no Centro de Formação Emaús, em Santarém, oeste do Pará. Durante três dias, cerca de 140 participantes destacaram os impactos sociais e ambientais provocados pelos projetos, além da resistência feita por lideranças de movimentos, indígenas e moradores locais contra hidrelétricas, portos, hidrovias, ferrovias, exploração mineral, e tantos outros. O encontro contou ainda com a participação de lideranças dos rios Xingu e Madeira, que relataram os problemas sociais e ambientais provocados pela construção das hidrelétricas de Belo Monte (Xingu), Madeira e Jirau (Rondônia). Segundo eles, tais empreendimento provocaram o aumento da pobreza e da violência nas regiões impactadas.
"Socialise information and studies regarding the projects under construction, operation or planned for the Juruena, Teles Pires and Tapajós rivers, and build a common agenda of resistance to these major projects. These were the objectives of the Water Meeting that took place from 14 to 16 June at the Emmaus Training Center in Santarém, western Pará.
Over three days, about 140 participants highlighted the social and environmental impacts of the projects, as well as resistance from movement leaders, indigenous and local residents against hydroelectric dams, ports, waterways, railroads, mineral exploration, and so on.
The meeting was also attended by leaders of the Xingu and Madeira rivers, who reported the social and environmental problems caused by the construction of the Belo Monte (Xingu), Madeira and Jirau (Rondônia) hydroelectric dams. According to them, such endeavors have led to increased poverty and violence in the impacted regions.


These are two films shared by ecologist Marlucia Martins with our WhatsApp group



1. Maravilhosa Amazônia / Wonderful Amazon 2019
2. Defensores da Amazônia / Defenders of the Amazon by Human Rights Watch 2019
Thank you for sharing, dear Marlucia!

 

List of Participants

Dan Baron and Manoela Souza, hosts, conveners, and organisers of this conference

Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet, host, convener, and organiser of this conference in Belém

Evelin Lindner, host, convener, and organiser of this conference

Gaby Saab, host, convener, and organiser of this conference

Linda Hartling, Director of HumanDHS, from Oregon, U.S.A.

Cristiane Vieira da Cunha, biologist, host and mentor in Tauiry, near Marabá

• Claudelice dos Santos, host and mentor in Nova Ipixuna near Marabá

Johan Galtung, via Skype from Spain on the first day

Antonio Carlos da Silva Rosa, via Skype from Portugal on the first day

• Claudia Chini, lawyer, Marabá

• Doelde Ferreira, teacher in the Irmã Theodora school in Marabá; her pupils made the letter to the world: Portuguese originalEnglish translation, German translation, French translation (translations by Evelin Lindner)

• Professor Paulo, teaching in Itupiranga, near Tauiry, Com-Vida is his project

Ronaldo Macena do Tauiry, coordinator of fishing villages near Marabá

Manoel de Deus Gomes da Silva, Vila Praia Alta near Marabá

Rafael Cabral in Tauiry

• Lucelia do Nascimento Souza, Tauriy, supporter

Evandra Vilacoert, responsible for containing fires in her community near Marabá

Michelliny Bentes, working with Embrapa Projects, depending on the Amazon Fund

Daniel Mangas, working with Embrapa Projects, depending on the Amazon Fund

Daniel Santiago Pereira and Anderson Schwamke, working with Embrapa Projects, depending on the Amazon Fund

• Dr. Marlucia Bonifácio Martins, annelidologist, Coordenação de Zoologia, Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi, Belém

• Deputado Dirceu Ten Caten, host in Belem

• Vitor Nascimento, host on Combú island

Kamolrat Intaratat and Piyachat from Thailand in Belém

These participants nurtured our conference from afar (through our WhatsApp group):

Linda Hartling, Director of HumanDHS, from Oregon, U.S.A.

Michael Britton, New Jersey, U.S.A.

Janet Gerson, NY, U.S.A.

Chipamong Chowdhury, U.S.A.

Rambabu Talluri, U.S.A.

• Ali Aalipour, U.S.A.

• Diane Perlman, U.S.A.

• Irene Javors, U.S.A.

• Thomas Walker, Oregon, U.S.A.

Dharm Bhawuk, Honolulu, Hawai'i

Francisco Gomes de Matos from Recife, Brasil

• Eduardo J. G. Carvalho, Executive Director na ABA - Associação Brasil-América, Recife, Brasil

• Redjane Andrade, English teacher in Recife, Brasil

David Calderoni, São Paulo, Brasil

• Natalia Brasil, Brasil

• Guilherme Nogueira, Brasil

• Marcelle Guil, Brasil

• Carolina Reis, Brasil

Ardian Adzanela, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Amita Neerav & Rajesh Dixit, India

• Kemal Taruc and Rangga, Indonesia

Noriko Ishihara, Japan

Zaynab El Bernoussi, Morocco

• Kebadu Gebremariam, Ethiopia

Joy Ndwandwe, Swaziland and South Africa

• Gert vd Westhuizen, South Africa

• Christopher Rutledge, South Africa

• Claudia Thimm, Germany

• Gisela Michalik, Germany

• Michael Boyer, Germany

• Sebastian Reh, Germany

Barbro Bakken, Norway

Lasse Moer from Oslo, Norway: Botanic garden in Oslo

 


 

Papers

All participants are warmly invited to send in papers.
Please notify us, if you wish to submit any of your papers also as a book chapter or as a journal article.

Please see earlier submitted papers here:
• List of All Publications

Francisco Gomes de Matos and Redjane Andrade (2019)
Dignity Studies Here!
Recife, Brazil, 17th October 2019.

 


 

Practical Details

•  How you could get to the conference venue
One way to go to Marabá is via Belém, the capital of the Amazonian State of Pará. It is 10 hours by bus or 45 minutes by plane (Azul flies from Belém to Marabá). Our caravan conference began in Marabá on the morning of 28th August and ended there on 3rd September 2019. (If we had been a larger group, collective boats, 20 people a time, go from the Imperial Hotel at reasonably prices and provide security. Simple coaches travelling outside or across the city, 40 people a time, are easy, very practical, and cheap).
After our caravan conference ended in Marabá, it continued in Belém in the afternoon of the 3rd September, and lasted until 7th September 2019.

• Where to stay
We always gratefully count on all participants to make their own transportation and accommodation arrangements. Some of the conveners stayed in the Imperial Hotel in Old Marabá, overlooking the River Tocantins. It is clean and modest (ca. 25 USD per night), ca. 12 minutes walk from the Cabelo Seco community, and located among restaurants and open-air bars. The reception speaks Portuguese, but little or no English. Address: Avenida Marechal Deodoro, 1923 Marabá Pioneira Marabá - PA, 68500-020 Telefone: +55 (94) 3321-0323. Internet at the hotel is variable, but good in the Kitutes restaurant and for dinner, reasonable in the Por do Sol (sunset) restaurant.
For Belém, Hotel Soft was recommended by Mano Souza and Dan Baron. Address: 612 Braz de Aguiar Boulevard, Centro, Nazaré Zip code: 66.035-000 Belém, PA, Brasil. It is well-located, a modest and safe city-centre hotel, beside an excellent restaurant for lunch and another for dinner.

We always kindly ask local participants who reside in close proximity of the conference venue to lend a helping hand to those traveling from afar, which also helps us keep our events collaborative, inclusive, and affordable for all.

Please enjoy some articles that introduce you to Cabelo Seco: Festival Beleza Amazônica 9th December 2017, 16th December 2017, and 21st December 2017. Enjoy some postcards (cartão postal Rios de encontro) from 2017:

• Please click on the cards from 2017 above to see them larger!


• Please click on the pictures from 2013 above to see them larger!

• Where to eat
Dan Baron kindly shared with us on 30th December 2017: 'Kitutes restaurant is our partner (in the Old City), and guarantees quality, health, diversity and good access for a buffet collective lunch'.

• Pre- and Post-conference experiences
• Visit of the Castanheiras of Eldorado dos Carajas (1999)
Monument
• For the adventurous: It is possible to go by boat from Belém to Manaus and continue on the Amazonas River from there.
Both excursions were not part of the conference.

•  Please kindly note that...
• There is no registration fee for our conferences. To cover our expenses, we always summarise the costs during the conference and invite participants to contribute according to their ability. This collaborative approach to financing allows us to keep the conference affordable for all.
• We like to get to know participants prior to our conferences and workshops, and prior to issuing an invitation.
• All our gatherings are by invitation only, please approach us so that we can include you and register you. Only our Public Events are open to everybody without registration.
• The Non-Public Parts of our gatherings have limited enrollment.
• Participants are encouraged to find their own sources of funding or economic support to participate in our conferences. We offer our nurturing work as our gift of love and care to you, ad we would like to lovingly invite everybody to contribute to this gift economy. If you need funding for your travels and housing, please use the invitation letter we send you and inquire in your country and your university about possibilities. See, among others, for the U.S., www.supportcenteronline.org and www.foundationscenter.org. The Weinstein International Fellowship program, inaugurated in 2008, provides opportunities for individuals from outside the United States to visit the U.S. to learn more about dispute resolution processes and practices and to pursue a project of their own design that serves to advance the resolution of disputes in their home countries.
• Participants in our conferences are kindly asked to handle all of their travel arrangements and required documentation, including requests for visas, on their side. HumanDHS is a volunteer initiative and does not have the staff or resources to assist with visa requests.

•  Permissions
During our conferences, we always ask all participants for their permission to have their pictures or videos posted on our website, however, if you change your mind later, either in total or for specific pictures/videos, please let us know! Thank you! Since we wish to walk the talk of dignity, it is very important for us to do our utmost in respecting everybody's privacy. We refrain from gathering written permissions from participants during our conferences since we value the creation of mutual trust in relationships and would like to refrain from contributing to an ever more bureaucratic and legalistic society.

•  Green conference and reinventing organization
We strive to organise our conferences as "Green Conferences". Lynn King kindly advises us. We also thank Vegard Jordanger for making us aware of Frederic Laloux's work on Reinventing Organizations (2014).

•  What happened in our previous conferences?
Please have a look at all our previous conferences and the newsletters written after these conferences.

 



Background Material

The Amazon On The Brink, documentary film by Albert Knechtel, Arte, available from 19/11/2019 to 11/12/2019: 'The Amazon region, the largest reservoir of biodiversity in the world, has experienced huge fires in recent months. But what does this disaster mean for the people who live there, and for the planet?'

• 'Indict Jair Bolsonaro Over Indigenous Rights, International Court Is Urged', by Dom Phillips in Rio de Janeiro, The Guardian, 28th November 2019.

• 'A Brief Account of "the Destruction of the Indians" in Brazil', by Leonardo Boff, 18th November 2019.

• 'Hatred of the Indian: How did the traditional middle class incubate so much hatred towards the people, leading them to embrace racialized fascism centered on the Indian as the enemy? The answer is the rejection of equality and the fundamentals of a substantial democracy', by Álvaro García Linera, Portside, 23rd November 2019: 'Bolivia's Vice-president Álvaro García Linera reflects on the role of racial hatred in motivating the coup which forced him and President Evo Morales out of office and into exile'. Thank you, dear Howard Richards, for sharing this article with us.

• '"Fire Is Medicine": The Tribes Burning California Forests to Save Them: For millennia, native people have used flames to protect the land. The US government outlawed the process for a century before recognizing its value', by Susie Cagle, The Guardian, 21st November 2019.

• 'Amazon Deforestation in Brazil Rose Sharply on Bolsonaro’s Watch: President Jair Bolsonaro has scaled back efforts to fight illegal logging, mining and farming, which have led to widespread destruction in the world’s largest rainforest', by Ernesto Londoño and Letícia Casado, New York Times, 18th November 2019.

• 'Amazon Deforestation "at Highest Level in a Decade": Almost 10,000 sq kms lost in year to August, according to Brazilian government data', by Jonathan Watts in Altamira, The Guardian, 18th November 2019.

• 'Deforestation rate in Amazon rises by a third', by Lucinda Elliott, Sao Paulo, Ben Webster, Environment Editor, The Times, 19th November 2019.

• 'The Amazon: On the Trontline of a Global Battle to Tackle the Climate Crisis: Brazil’s National Institute of Space Research Said the Number of Fires Detected by Satellite in the Amazon Region in August Was the Highest Since 2010', by Jonathan Watts Terra do Meio, The Guardian, 17th November 2019.

• 'The Amazon at a Tipping Point: Can We Turn It Around? Keynote address by Leila Salazar-López, Amazon Watch Executive Director, at the 2019 Bioneers Conference', Amazon Watch, 14th November 2019.

• 'World Scientists Call for Global System Change to Address Climate Emergency', by Curtis Johnson, Truthout, 12th November 2019.

• 'Poorly planned Amazon dam project 'poses serious threat to life': Operator faces choice of weakening 14km barrier or potentially devastating a biodiversity hotspot', by Jonathan Watts in Belo Monte, The Guardian, 8th November 2019.

• 'Deforestation in Brazil Jumped by 80% in One Year: Study', Telesur, 7th November 2019.

• 'The Life and Death of the Guajajara', by Carol Marcal, Greenpeace, 8th November 2019.

• 'Bolsonaro Puts Up Brazilian Richest Oil Wells for Sale to Foreign Companies', by Tortilla Con Sal, Telesur, October 31, 2019.

• 'Norway Is The First Country In The World To Ban Deforestation, More Countries Need To Follow Suit', by Andrea D. Steffen, Intelligent Living, 5th April 2019.

• 'Illegal loggers kill Amazon indigenous warrior who guarded forest, wound another', Reuters, Yahoo News, 2nd November 2019.

• 'BlackRock's Ghoulish lack of action for the Amazon', by Moira Birss, Amazon Watch, 31st October 2019.

• 'Amazon Rainforest "Close to Irreversible Tipping Point": Forecast Suggests Rainforest Could Stop Producing Enough Rain to Sustain Itself by 2021', by Dom Phillips in Rio de Janeiro, The Guardian, 23rd October 2019.

• 'Brazilian Congress Approves Neoliberal Pension Reform, Human Wrongs Watch, 22nd October 2019.

• 'Why Climate Deniers Hate Activists So Much: Guilt', by Rosie McCall, Newsweek, 27th September 2019.

• 'People Are Seriously Talking About Invading Brasil to Save the Planet: With the Amazon Burning, Some Foreign Policy Experts Foresee a New Era of Global Conflict Shaped by Climate Catastrophe', by Aaron Gell, Medium, 24th September 2019.

• 'Imagine Jair Bolsonaro Standing Trial for Ecocide at The Hague', by Ernesto Londoño, Times’s Brasil bureau chief, New York Times, 21st September 2019.

• 'LatAm in Focus: Can International Law Save the Amazon?', by Luisa Leme, AS/COA (Americas Society / Council of the Americas), 20th September 2019.

A Dialogue for a Possible Amazon, United Nations, 22nd September 2019, shared by Marlucia Martins.

• 'The Amazon Burns. But Another Part of Brasil Is Being Destroyed Faster', by Amy Woodyatt, CNN, 22nd September 2019.

• 'Incêndio em Alter do Chão (PA) se agrava, e estado pede ajuda da Força Nacional', by Eliane Trindade, Folha de S.Paulo, 15th September 2019.

• 'Incêndio atinge área de proteção ambiental no Pará', Deutsche Welle, 16th September 2019.

• 'The Right to a Future - With Naomi Klein and Greta Thunberg', The Intercept, 11th September 2019.

• '"Chaos, Chaos, Chaos": A Journey Through Bolsonaro's Amazon Inferno', by Tom Phillips, The Guardian, 9th September 2019.

• 'State Governors Support Bolsonaro’s Amazon Mining, Agribusiness Plans', by Jenny Gonzales, Mongabay, 9th September 2019.
Mongabay is a U.S.-based non-profit conservation and environmental science news platform.

• ‘The World Has Never Seen a Threat to Human Rights of this Scope’, by Agence France-Presse in Geneva, The Guardian, 9th September 2019.

• 'Brasil: Attorney General Warns About Attack on Indigenous Lands', Telesur, 3rd September 2019.

• 'The Burning of the Amazon Is Just the Tip of the Iceberg: Plundering Nature Is the Norm within Our Legal and Economic Systems. Our Survival Depends on Charting a New Course', by Alex May, Open Democracy, 30th August 2019.

• 'Global NGOs: Dirty Dozen Companies Driving Deforestation Must Act Now to Stop the Burning of the World's Forests', Amazon Watch, 30th August 2019: Groups call for the immediate suspension of all business and financing with traders active in the Brazilian Amazon: 'The Amazon is on fire. Corporations share the blame. They need to become part of the solution'.

• 'Bolsonaro and Ecocide in the Amazon – Some Questions Answered' from the Stop Ecocide Team, 30th August 2019

• 'Reserva indígena arde em chamas', Por Redação, Correio de Carajas, 29 de agosto de 2019.

• 'Beyond Brasil: Who Benefits from the Fires in the Bolivian Amazon?' by Damián Andrada, IWGIA - International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs, 29th August 2019.

• 'In Bolsonaro’s Burning Brazilian Amazon, All Our Futures Are Being Consumed', by Eliane Brum, The Guardian, 28h August 2019: 'The rainforest might seem a remote place, but it is the heart of the planet – and it is under attack as never before'.

• 'Uncontacted Tribes Now Threatened by Amazon Fires', Survival International, 28th August 2019.

• 'Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Key in Stemming Amazon Fires', IWGIA - International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs, 28th August 2019.
The International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs is a global human rights organisation dedicated to promoting, protecting and defending indigenous peoples’ rights.

• 'Let the World’s Future Not Turn into Ashes', by Beverly Longid, Inter Press Service (IPS), 28th August 2019.

• 'Widespread Fires Harm Global Climate, Environment', World Meteorological Organization (WMO), 28th August 2019.

• 'Brazilian Amazon Deforestation Surges to Break August Records: 1,114.8 sq km Cut Down this Month, the Same Area as Hong Kong – on Top of Damage from Fires', by Jonathan Watts Global environment editor, The Guardian, 27th Aug 2019.

• 'Stop Blaming Cows and Start Targeting the Corporations that are Destroying the Amazon', by: Anthony Pahnke, Telesur, 27th August 2019.

• 'Brasil Officials Failed to Act after Warning of 'Fire Day’ in Amazon, Prosecutors Say': Investigation into Why Environment Agency Ignored Warnings that Farmers and Land-Grabbers Were Planning Day of Coordinated Fires', by Dom Phillips in Rio de Janeiro, The Guardian, 26th August 2019.

• 'Amazon Rainforest Fire: Brasil Federal Prosecutors Open Official Investigation into Fires', by Georgina Laud, Express, 23rd August 2019.

• 'How Long Do We Have to Limit the Climate Crisis: 18 Months or 11 Years?', by Anca Rusu, Ethical Net, 22nd August 2019.

• 'Environmental Activist Murders Double in 15 Years: Death Toll Almost Half that of US Troops Killed in Afghanistan and Iraq since 2001, Data Shows', by Jonathan Watts, The Guardian, 5th August 2019.

• 'The Religion of This People Is Their Land,' say Sr. Dorothy Stang's successors', by Carlos Tautz, Global Sisters Report, 13th June 2019.

• 'The Guardian View on Higher Education: Humans Need the Humanities: The Subjects of Least Obvious Use May Prove to Be of Ultimate Value', The Guardian, 30th April 2019.

• '2018 Sees Deforestation of 12M Hectares, Brasil Leads in Losses', Telesur, 26th April 2019.

• 'Edir Macedo Has a Church, a Bank, a TV Channel, and a Moses Complex. And with the Election of Jair Bolsonaro, He Has emerged as the Country’s Most Controversial Kingmaker', by Alexander Zaitchick and Christopher Lord, New Republic, 7th February 2019.

• 'Amazon Deforestation, Already Rising, May Spike under Bolsonaro', by Robert T. Walker, The Conversation, 28th January 28, 2019.

• 'Brasil Environment Chief Accused of "War on NGOs" as Partnerships Paused: Civil Society Groups Condemn Move by Minister, Appointed by Far-Right President Jair Bolsonaro, as Illegal Attack on Environment', by Anna Jean Kaiser in Rio de Janeiro, The Guardian, 17th January 2019.

• 'Could One Man Single-Handedly Ruin the Planet?' by David Wallace-Wells, Intelligencer, 31st October 2018.

• 'Brasil: 1 Millon Women Unite Against Alt-Right Bolsonaro', Telesur, 14 September 2018.

• 'How Brasil Can Beat the Odds and Restore a Huge Swathe of the Amazon', by Danilo Ignacio de Urzedo and Robert Fisher, The Conversation, 28th August 2018.

• '207 miljøvernere ble drept i fjor. Nå reagerer Norge', by Torgeir P. Krokfjord, Dagbladet, 27. august 2018.

• 'We Only Protect What We Love: Michael Soule On The Vanishing Wilderness', by Leath Tonino, The Sun Magazine, April 2018, pp. 4 - 16.

• 'UN Moves Towards Recognising Human Right to a Healthy Environment', by Jonathan Watts, Global environment editor, The Guardian, 9th March 2018: 'Formal recognition would help protect those who increasingly risk their lives to defend the land, water, forests and wildlife, says the UN special rapporteur on human rights and the environment'.

• 'Latin American Countries Sign Legally Binding Pact to Protect Land Defenders', by Arthur Neslen, The Guardian, 5th March 2018: 'New treaty compels states to investigate and punish killings and attacks on people defending their land or environment'.

• 'Brasil Announces End to Amazon Mega-Dam Building Policy', Mongabay Series: Amazon Infrastructure, Global Forests, by Sue Branford, Mongabay News & Inspiration from Nature's Frontline, 3rd January 2018.

• 'Dams Hurt Indigenous and Fishing Communities in Brazilian Amazon', by Mario Osava, Inter Press Service, October 22, 2017.

• Invitation to Rivers of Creativity, cultural action for life, which includes ‘Future Now!’ (exchange of projects, February-July 2017); ‘Worldwide Wave‘ (solidarity action with the Amazon, 27-30 May 2017); and ‘Forum of Wellbeing’ (28 July-04 August 2017).

• Community University of the Rivers: Cultivating transformative pedagogies within formal education in the Amazon, by Dan Baron, 2017.

• Community University of the Rivers: Cultivating transformative pedagogies within formal education in the Amazon, by Dan Baron, 2016.

There Is a River Above Us, TEDxAmazonia talk by Antonio Donato Nobre, 15. mar. 2011.

• Waste, poem by Dan Baron, 2005.

• 'Living with Brasil's landless', by BBC News Online's Dominic Bailey, BBC News, 14th April, 2003.