December 9, 2022
11.00 am – 4.00 pm New York Time
This will be a virtual workshop
representing the
19th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
and the 38th Annual HumanDHS Conference

hosted by
The Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution
(MD-ICCCR)
Columbia University, Teachers College (TC)
525 West 120th Street, New York City, NY 10027
in cooperation with the World Dignity University initiative

You may want to calculate your local time (Aotearoa/New Zealand one day ahead)

Kindly see the program further down on this site or download it as Pdf
See your invitation sent out on October 16, 2022, and on November 14, 2022

In preparation for attending this workshop, all participants are kindly asked to make themselves familiar with
the Appreciative Enquiry Frame that we use in our work
See an introduction created by Linda Hartling on August 23, 2022
(see also 2021, 2020, 2019, 2016, 2015, 2014 (see also Pdf), 2012, 2011,
and see An Appreciative Frame, written by Linda Hartling in 2005, and see also an early overview)

All participants were furthermore asked to kindly learn about our
Dignilogue (Dignity + Dialogue) Approach and Connection-Reflection Groups

This workshop series is being hosted annually since 2003
by
The Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution
(MD-ICCCR)
Columbia University, Teachers College (TC)
525 West 120th Street, New York City, NY 10027
in cooperation with the World Dignity University initiative

Honorary Convenor since 2003
Morton Deutsch
First HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award Recipient in 2009

(he sadly passed away in March 2017, and we honor his memory)

Linda Hartling & Morton Deutsch & Evelin Lindner
Evelin Lindner, Morton Deutsch, Linda Hartling
This photo was taken in 2014
Please click on the picture to it larger


Message of gratitude to Linda M. Hartling
Linda Hartling nurtured this workshop series into being. See a round of appreciations for Linda at the end of Day Two (Video) and at the end of Day Three of the workshop (Video). See also a message of gratitude from Evelin Lindner, recorded prior to the 2020 workshop on November 25 and December 9, 2020 (Video)


All our workshops are invitations to explore how we can best deepen, grow, and practice the global message of dignity — now and far into the future.

If you wish to participate in our workshops, please send an email to workshops@humiliationstudies.org. Please kindly include your contact information and any other details you would like to share with our community (such as CV, papers, articles, presentations, video links, etc.).

Please know that you are always invited to spend the entire workshop with us, so that true dignity-family building can emerge. All our events are part of an ongoing effort to nurture a global community of people who wish to nurture more dignity in the world. The workshop series follows a format of organic growth, and is thus different from mainstream conferences. In all our events, our aim is to create a community — rather than having an "audience" listen to "speakers" or "presenters." All participants are warmly invited to fill out our Appreciative Introduction form (Word | PDF) and send it to us or bring it with them.

There is no registration fee, we share minimal cost according to ability. To cover our expenses, we always summarise the costs during the conference and invite participants to contribute according to their ability. This collaborative approach to financing allows us to keep the conference affordable for all. Our work is a labor of love and maintained entirely by those who give their time and energy as a gift. All our efforts are pro bono and not-for-profit endeavors. Everyone who participates does so because of dignity, because of their appreciation for our work for dignity. Nobody is there "for the money," nobody is being paid, there is no "paid staff." This is our way of walking our talk of "being the change we want to see in the world." We welcome all donations to this workshop, be it your time, your creativity, or, if you wish, your economic support (please see this secure link). We thank all participants in our conferences for being fully responsible for bearing the cost of their own travel, transportation, and accommodation arrangements. We also strive to organize our conferences as Green Conferences. Thank you for your loving support!

This page is part of our larger website that serves as a "virtual field journal" and an open resource, documenting all of our events and initiatives over time, always remaining available to our global dignity community. Our members regularly consider a variety of electronic options for sharing our efforts on social media (see, for instance, the Digniworld initiative), and we have found it beneficial to keep the main HumanDHS website organized by posting the contents of events on extended pages, with links to additional information both on other pages of our website and on external places. The entire website resembles a large "organism," a large web of content that weaves together our entire work since 2001.

During our conferences, we always ask all participants for their permission to have their pictures or videos posted on our website, however, if you change your mind later, either in total or for specific pictures/videos, please let us know! Thank you! Since we wish to walk the talk of dignity, it is very important for us to do our utmost in respecting everybody's privacy. We refrain from gathering written permissions from you during our conferences, since we value the building of mutual trust in relationships, and we also would like to refrain from contributing to an ever more bureaucratic and legalistic society.

• See the program of this workshop further down on this site or as Pdf
• See the post-workshop gratitude letter sent out on February 7, 2022, "Celebrating Everyone's Contribution to Our December Workshop!"

Please see here the invitations that were sent out prior to this workshop:
Welcome to the World Dignity University Initiative! sent out on October 16, 2022 (backup on this website)
Dignity Letter — The Latest News from Your Dignity Community! You Are Personally Invited to Our December Workshop! sent out on November 14, 2022 (backup on this website)

• For previous workshops, see a compilation of all NY workshops and the newsletters written after these conferences.

• This workshop is the nineteenth workshop in a series that began in 2003. See an overview over all our previous conferences and see the workshops of 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021.


Thank you for reviewing the following tips for smooth "zooming"

 


Please click on the images to see them larger

• Please watch Linda Hartling explaining the use of the camera and microphone during this workshop (Video on Day Three of last year's workshop)

• Please note that all sessions are being recorded except for the Connection-Reflection Groups.
If you do not wish to be recorded, you are asked to please kindly turn off your video and microphone.

• In all our gatherings, we ask you to please kindly mute your microphone and turn off your video during plenary sessions
to protect the quality of our electronic connection. Thank you!


Program of the Workshop (still evolving)


11:00 – 11:30 am
• Welcome and Greetings, Introducing this Special Workshop
Linda Hartling, Director of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network
Danielle Coon, Associate Director of the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR), Columbia University, Teachers College (TC)
Evelin Lindner, Founding President of HumanDHS
• Building a Mutual-Learning Community: The Appreciative Enquiry Approach (Thank you for viewing the Appreciative Enquiry video prior to the workshop)

Danielle Coon joined the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution as the Associate Director in September 2015. With over 10 years’ experience overseeing direct service programs in diverse settings and as an alumna of the Negotiation and Conflict Resolution program at Columbia University, Danielle is dedicated to applying principles of conflict resolution and systemic structural change to all management and project activities.


11:30 am – 12:00 pm
The Way Out Challenge — Peter Coleman, Director of the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR), Columbia University, Teachers College (TC)

Please watch: Thanksgiving table conversations can get tense. Here’s how to prepare, PBS NewsHour, November 22, 2022
Food, family … and friction. Thanksgiving gatherings can be filled with great joy and connection, but they can also devolve into arguments over the recent midterm elections, the ongoing COVID pandemic or the best way to cook a turkey. To cope with – and strategize for – potential strife at your Thanksgiving table, PBS NewsHour digital anchor Nicole Ellis spoke with Columbia University psychology professor Peter Coleman to get his best tips for anxious feast-goers. “It’s possible just to start the dinner by saying, ‘I love you all and I’m so glad you’re here and I’m glad we’re connected with each other. And in the past, we’ve gotten into some rough conversations. If possible, let’s agree to respect each other today,’” Coleman said.


12:00 am – 12:15 pm
• Meet and Greet – Small Group Dignilogues – Introduced by Janet Gerson

Dr. Janet C. Gerson is a HumanDHS Board Member and she co-hosts Dignity Now circles in New York City since 2015. She is a political theorist, writer, artist, and activist educator who has taught peace education, conflict processes, transformative learning, and futures envisioning. She is the Education Director of the International Institute on Peace Education (IIPE), and former Co-Director of the Peace Education Center at Teachers College, Columbia University in New York City (2001- 2010). She has collaborated with the Morton Deutsch International Center on Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR) at at Teachers College since 1996. Her research and writing focus on the interrelatedness of dignity, justice, democracy and peace.


12:15 pm – 12:30 pm
• Learning for a Dignified and Dignifying Future — Evelin Lindner, Founding President of HumanDHS and Global Ambassador of the WDUi, and Linda Hartling, Director of HumanDHS

Evelin: The World Dignity University (WDU) initiative is an invitation by its founders to all educators and learners who wish to place dignity at the core of teaching and learning. The word university is derived from the Latin universitas magistrorum et scholarium, meaning "a community of teachers and scholars." The WDU initiative envisions returning to the original meaning of the word and form a universitas magistrorum et scholarium globalis, a global community of teachers and scholars, who share the aim of furthering dignity in the world. All like-minded educators and learners of the world are invited, whether they are part of local universities or not, to share their knowledge as a gift to the world.

Linda: The WDU initiative is an invitation to all who wish to walk the talk of dignity in mutually shared learning activities and experiences. The WDU initiative is dedicated to doing so by realizing the spirit and practice of dignity in all of its proceedings. It is an invitation to develop ideas for dignity within a global community, and to explore how those ideas can be turned into dignifying action.
The WDU initiative aspires to be a bridge-building space for learning, bringing together individual teachers and learners, in concert with supportive institutions, who share in this effort according to their ability, and where their gift is not measured and calculated.
The WDU initiative wishes to create a mutually beneficial community of educators and learners, that supports the personal growth and intellectual development of all involved. We like to think of the experience of the WDU initiative as a gift to the world.
The many benefits of the WDU initiative, especially for the educators involved, include:

• it provides a one-of-a-kind platform for global learning in a diverse community of learners and scholars
• it brings global attention to the important work of educators who put dignity at the core of learning
• it provides the opportunity for practical training in online learning and conducting dignilogues (dignity + dialogue)
• it provides the opportunity for mutual support within a community of dignity-minded people.

Evelin: Two points are particularly important:
1. Love: We wish to transcend the academic tradition of combative debate and detached objectivity, not least because these practices are informed by a misunderstood concept of science. Instead, we wish to make loving relationship building central to our academic work. Philosopher Ágnes Heller warned that "masculinist models of consciousness objectify world order, obfuscating how fluid and continuously malleable it in reality is" (in Everyday Life, London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1984). In other words, we wish to transcend masculinist models of consciousness in our work. We sympathize with philosopher Iris Murdoch, who said, "We need a moral philosophy in which the concept of love, so rarely mentioned now by philosophers, can once again be made central" (in Existentialists and Mystics: Writings on Philosophy and Literature, Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1999, page 337). We sympathize with the concept of kama muta, Sanskrit for "moved by love," that anthropologist Alan Page Fiske and his team have developed.

2. Money: We acknowledge that people need livelihoods, and we support them in their efforts. However, we wish to develop our WDU initiative as a space outside of the money-making academic "business." We have established a climate of generous collaboration, unencumbered by competition for financial resources, by inviting our friends to contribute according to their ability and no more — be it with giving their time, their knowledge, their skills, or creativity, and this could also include donations of money. If this initiative went toward conventional monetization, it would not only undo the not-for-profit status of our work, it would also be profoundly humiliating, because it would disregard the enormous amount of labor-of-love work donated by hundreds of our community members over the last decades. Through our members' labors of love, a foundation of integrity has been built, integrity derived from not monetizing our efforts.

We therefore invite all those friends into our WDUi project who deeply understand and value the generous action gifts of our community. We invite all those friends into this project who deeply acknowledge and honor the fact that it is through others' generosity they receive extraordinary global visibility and credibility. Just to clarify the size of the donations offered so far, Linda left a job where she had 80,000 USD per year, and if she were to be compensated for donating her past 19 years, this would make 1,520,000 USD. The same goes for me, to avoid burdening our network with expenditure, I live a precarious life without global health insurance while serving as our dignity work's global ambassador. If money should be involved at all, we wish it to be in the form of donations, and the first donations should go to the dignity work itself. After that, participating educators can guide their students, if they want to, to their own private websites, where students could be invited to offer donations to their teachers.

Linda and I have almost twenty years of shared leadership experience. We are often asked, typically by men, "Why don't you do A or B or C?" We answer, "Because we are far beyond that, we are at X, Y, Z." We have kept our work largely free of internal strife for the past decades, which is unique, given that most similar organizations crumble from internal conflict triggered by competition for resources.

We invite everyone who wishes to contribute to do so in a spirit of a gift economy. We are privileged to have the "mother" of the concept of a gift economy in our community, Geneviève Vaughan. Also Howard Richards is an esteemed member in our community, have a look at his new book, Economic Theory and Community Development: Why Putting Community First Is Essential to Our Survival (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2022). You may also want to see Evelin's book from 2012 on a Dignity Economy.

Linda: We have come to believe that a “World Dignity University” — a human-to-human network of networks — is a powerful and highly practical approach to realizing an inclusive and creative model of learning. As peace poet William Stafford notes: “The creative life of unknown people might be a tremendous hidden river.” And we need to follow that river if we are going to find solutions to the crises we are facing in the world today!

We envision that the WDUi as a bridge-building learning community that unites scholars and learners in concert to put dignity at the core of learning, locally and globally! Reaching out to those who are integrating dignity into their efforts in many diverse ways, such as the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution under the leadership of Peter Coleman, the Center for Rebuilding Sustainable Communities After Disasters at the UMass Boston, under the direction of Adenrele Awatona, and the Western Institute of Social Research in Berkeley, California, under the leadership of John Bilorusky in collaboration with David Yamada!

We invite educators, scholars, practitioners, activists, learners, and people from all walks of life, from all corners of the earth, to share responsibility for leading the world toward greater cooperation by joining in this endeavor. Though the world is drowning in a sea of information and “angertainment,” we seek to foster a mutually energizing space for "a deep ecology of thought,” as Philosophers Arne Naess and Elizabeth Minnich inspire us to do. His Royal Highness Prince El Hassan bin Talal of Jordan is leading the world toward a dignifying “cogitosphere,” a thought sphere that generates new life-saving solutions to the humiliating crises of sociocide, ecocide, and genocide.

Our dignicommunity wants “to learn our way to a better future,” as Board Member Michael Britton emphasizes. Summarizing the vision of the WDUi, he asks: “When it comes to wisdom and experience, what if all the world is our university?”

Kindly see more about the WDU initiative on our
education page
• newsletter 12
• and in last workshop's Pre-Planned Dignilogue #4: Plotting the Future of the World Dignity University Initiative


• Introducing the Director of the WDUi, David Yamada, and Uli Spalthoff, Director of Operations of WDUi and Dignity Press

David is a law professor at Suffolk University Law School in Boston, where he has been doing important work on addressing workplace bullying and expanding the field of therapeutic jurisprudence. He has been a member of our HumanDHS Board for many years and recently agreed to become the director of the WDUi.

Uli worked with innovation management at Alcatel-Lucent in Germany and France. As Director of Advanced Technologies, he worked with a global team, mentoring start-ups and consulting high-tech companies in IT, telecommunication and semiconductor industries from countries all over the world. Being interested in a broad range of professional fields and diverse social contexts, he has acquired expertise in a large range of technical, economic, and social areas. After his retirement, he wanted to nurture more innovative ideas to shape our future. In 2021, he kindly wrote, "I regard the concept of human dignity as a most valuable tool for organizing our societies. After retiring from a technical career I am happy to explore this and to learn more ways how people can work for a dignified common future. Currently I am working with Dignity Press, publishing books covering a wide range of themes connected with human dignity."


12:30 – 12:45 pm
• Bio-Break/Coffee Break (please mute) — Chat Open


12:45 – 2:30 pm
Workshop within a Workshop: Non-Degree Higher and Adult Education to Advance Human Dignity — facilitated by David Yamada, Director of the WDUi
Kindly see an evolving set of links that lead to information about ancient famous schools, historic learning institutions, adult education centers, universities offering substantial non-credit course offerings, informal and self-directed learning initiatives, and platforms for hosting online courses.


2:30 – 3:00 pm
• Introducing the WDUi Electronic Learning Platform — Uli Spathoff, Director of Operations


3:00 – 3:45 pm
• Don Klein Memorial Lecture: Rediscovering the Wonders of Learning Through Dignity — Michael Britton, HumanDHS Board Member (Video recorded on November 21, 2022)

Michael is a HumanDHS Board Director, who has been part of the community since 2007. He has been our Don Klein Memorial lecturer since it was created, and is the recipient of our 2017 Lifetime Commitment Award! He is a co-founder of Dignity Now NYC which, thanks to Zoom, is now also global. He is Vice President of the International Psychohistory Association, and has lectured locally and internationally.


3:45 – 4:00 pm
(and beyond for those who wish to stay longer)
• Concluding Appreciations and Inspirations for Continuing the Dialogue — Evelin Lindner, Linda Hartling, David Yamada, and Michael Britton


Music, Movement, and Poetry

A big thank you to all
music, movement, and poetry contributors
throughout the workshop!

Bonnie Selterman kindly recited Ways of Learning, a spoken poem composed for the specific theme of this year's workshop (Spoken recording on November 18, 2022 | Pdf)
Thank you so much, dear Bonnie! Each year, you offer us your immensely dignifying creativity!

Francisco Gomes de Matos kindly composed a rhymed reflection as a contribution to this Workshop on November 17, 2022

Dignity is a mulltidimeñsional
Intercultural innovation
Dignity is human character Elevation
Dignity is deep interpersonal Transformation
Dignity is sustainable peace Education
Dignity is econoqualĺty Proclamation
Dignity is global harmony Communications
Dignity is Human Rights application

 

 


 

Registered Participants (alphabetical according to the first name)

In the 2020 registration form, participants were warmly invited to reflect on the following question: What does dignity mean to you?
In the 2021 registration form, the question was: What does dignity through solidarity mean to you?
Many participants kindly offered their conceptualization of dignity and their responses are listed below. Furthermore, the relational nature of our dignity work is made visible by small personal "love letters" that honor the dignifying connectivity that forms the foundation of the global dignity fellowship.

Alayar Kangarlu, New York City

Associate Professor of Neurobiology at Columbia University.

Alayar Kangarlu kindly wrote on February 16, 2022:

Dear Dr. Lindner, I am writing to express my appreciation and admiration for your book entitled "A Dignity Economy". I am particularly interested in the concept of dignity, its relationship to sovereignty and their effect on multilateral cooperation and globalization. Recently, I have been working on the possibility of elevating human dignity to the state of a legal natural right and its precedence over national sovereignty. As you well know this issue has been controversial in the past and particularly in the US foreign policy...

   

Abuelgassim Gour, Khartoum, Sudan

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Abuelgassim Gour explained, "It means Human Rights and culture of peace."

Dear Abuelgassim Gour, thank you so much for sharing with us your play The Trilogy of Rejected War.

   

Angélica Walker, New York City and Brazil

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Angélica responded by saying, "Everything! Without solidarity 'dignity' is just an institution."

Thank you, dear Angélica, for your loving support! Thank you for your important "Message to the World" (Video Day Two | Video Day Three | Video recorded on December 8, 2021)! Welcome as wonderful Dignigardener for our "Connection/Reflection Groups!

   

Angelyn Voss, Oregon, U.S.A.

Dear Angelyn, it was great to have you with us in our 2018 December Workshop and to honor you! (Video)
Thank you so much for your wonderful support!

In her registration for this workshop, Angelyn wrote: "As a teacher and member of society, she concludes, one must exude respect to all students and individuals. Promoting dignity opens the doors to acceptance, encouragement, peace, learning, and ultimately, love."
Angelyn invites everyone to visit her website www.angelynchristyvoss.com. She is happy to donate a book or a piece of artwork if that could help.

   

Anke Winchenbach, Guildford, England

What does "dignity through solidarity" mean to you? "Makes me think about the core values of the Economy for the Common Good, where solidarity spans across all stakeholders."

A very warm welcome to our workshop, dear Anke!

   

Anna Strout, Albuquerque, New Mexico, New York City, U.S.A.

Dear Anna! We have many names for you, and all the names we have for you express our love, gratitude, and admiration for you! We have names such as Dignity Angel...!
How can we ever thank you enough for your wonderful presence, including your gift of photography! We cannot imagine our workshops without your presence anymore, since Zehlia Babaci-Wilhite brought you to us in 2012!

Thank you so much for jumping in and doing Zoom photography in these times of a pandemic where everything had to be virtual:

2021: All of Anna Strout's group photo sessions:

Day One • With Danielle Coon (Video recording 1 | Video recording 2 | Video recording 3)
• End of Day (Video recording 1 | Video recording 2)
Day Two • End of Day (Video)
Day Three • After Evelin Lindner's talk (Video)
• End of Day (Video | Video with Banner)

2020: All of Anna Strout's group photo sessions:

Day One • Day One (Video | see also long | short)
Day Three • End of Dignilogue 5 (Video)
• End of Day (Video)

• Thanks so much also for sharing this Message to the World — Prevent Domestic Violence in our 2020 workshop! (PSA shared on November 15, 2020 | Small poster | Video)
(PSA = a public service announcement in the public interest disseminated without charge, with the objective of raising awareness)

   

Asma Ahmad, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Zaha Experience Fouder/ UN consultant Human narrative, accountability, ownership, diversity and inclusion

Dear Asma, thank you for sharing your thoughts in your registration for this workshop:

A human that is utterly fascinated and empowered by two questions in life: What is home? And where do I end and where does the other start? This strong drive led me to explore the human narrative in the form of "the I in the presence of the Other" that teaches us that the other restes deeply in our narrative and inside of us.
I was born in a farmer family, experienced war at the age of 7, feeling aliented for 15 years later. But my parents' resilience got me to places and I graduated from one of the top schools in the UK. I currently work for the UN.

   

Beth Boynton, Dover, New Hampshire, U.S.A.

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Beth explained, "We are creating a rippling effect of dignity throughout the world. A way of being together."

Thank you so much, dearest Beth, for offering the Bonus Session in last year's workshop, titled "Warm-up Activities for Engaging & Connecting Your Groups on Zoom" to us and sharing your

Thank you for sharing a few samples noting the learning context can vary:
Building-situational-awareness
Hello-goodbye-ease-into-improv-activities
Dignity Exchange: An Experiential Activity for Promoting Dignity Everywhere

• Thank you for sharing also a brief update on your work on June 2nd, 2020. You and your colleague Liz Korabek-Emerson piloted a virtual field trip with Creative Mornings where you did an hour of mindfulness and improv.
• Thank you also for making us aware and commenting on this article: "Elevating Dignity as a Goal for Health System Achievement in the COVID-19 Era and in the Future"

   

Bonnie Selterman, Greater New York City Area

You are among our deepest and most complex thinkers and most loving nurturers of dignity, dear Bonnie! We cannot imagine our workshop series without you anymore! You generously joined us in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021! Thank you for sharing your profound reflections also in this workshop, as always!

Ways of Learning, a spoken poem composed for the specific theme of this year's workshop (Spoken recording on November 18, 2022 | Pdf)

Dignity Through Solidarity — A Spoken Essay and Poem (Video | Text | Spoken recording on November 21, 2021)
…shall we see the light of possibility
Through ingenuity
Through human dignity
Respecting ecology
The life-sustaining
Strategy
Of solidarity?

Escaping Complicity — A Poem (Video | Pdf | Spoken recording on November 21, 2020)
Notes on Human Dignity as a Concept That Can Be Taught, reflections prepared in May 2019 for the 2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City, December 5 – 6, 2019.

Message from Evelin Lindner: I am so thankful to Maria Volpe for bringing us together, dear Bonnie! Thank you for coming to my talk Understanding and Addressing Humiliation, December 2, 2010, 8-10 am, convened by our esteemed Maria Volpe at her monthly breakfast meeting (since 9/11 on the first Thursday of each month) at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City (see the 2010 pictures)! I will never forget when you took me to hear Bill McKibben speak in the Tishman Auditorium at the New School University Center, on November 10, 2016, and our conversation afterwards. In the book that I am finalizing now, I am widely quoting you, among others from the questions you asked us in 2018.

   

Brian Ward, Christchurch, New Zealand/Aotearoa

What does "dignity through solidarity" mean to you? "It means the ultimate solidarity that equal dignity offers all humans."

A very warm welcome to you, dear Brian! Thank you so much for sharing the poem The River of Life that you had composed at the occasion of the passing of your dear mother at the age of 101 (Video)

The River of Life
I float
I float on the river of life
I get washed under only to rise again
I bump into the bank only to bounce back
I can steer myself but cannot steer others
I can only show others how I steer myself
It’s wonderful I am part of the river
And once I reach the river mouth
I become part of the sea of everything
That make all journeys possible

Thank you also very much for sharing your thoughts at the end of the workshop (Video)!

We will never forget how generously you hosted our 2011 Dignity Conference in Dunedin!

   
 

Camille Elliott

   

Carly McCarty, Riverside, U.S.A.

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Carly explained, "Dignity is the intrinsic value in every human being. Solidarity is acknowledging, empowering, and advocating for the value that every human being deserves."

A very warm welcome to you, dear Carly!

   

Charlott Macek, New York City

Thank you so much, dear Charlott, for your untiring support to our dignity work since you began working with the MD-ICCCR in 2013, after your time at the book shop of Teachers College! Each year, you give us great courage! What would we do without your expert caring hand in the background and your wonderful presence!

   

Chipamong (Chipa) Chowdhury, or Bhante Revata Dhamma (monk's name, known in the monastic communities), Nomad Eco-Monk, with interest in Nomadic life, Buddhism/Cinema, Pali literature, Religion/Politics/global affairs

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Bhante Revata explained, "It reminds me of the words 'Agitate, educate and organize' by Dr. Ambedkar."

Thank you so much, dear Bhante, for your most inspiring life as a "nomad eco-monk"! We remember how you wrote to us in 2008 after you got to know about our work in the United Nations Indigenous Forum, in the Seventh Session “Climate change, bio-cultural diversity and livelihoods: The stewardship role of indigenous peoples and new challenges,” April 21 – May 2, 2008. Your wish was to participate in our 2008 Norway conference, however, you were ultimately hindered to join us, and we were delighted to have you with us in our 2008 workshop in New York City! From then on you have been a gift of dignity in every single of our workshops, every year! By now, you have grown to be a core member of our dignity nurturing team, and we thank you for being such a gift to the world and to our dignity community!

Thank you so much for initiating and co-editing this important and most touching book, and for writing the Preface:
Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael F. Britton, and Linda M. Hartling (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

Thank you for your many generous and important contributions to this workshop:
A Poem — Inner Dignity for Daily Meditation and Reflection shared on Day Two (Video)
• You offered a Bonus Session titled Pandemic, Inner Adventure, and Nomad Mindfulness! on Day Two of the workshop (Video)
• You contributed to Dignilogue 5 on Day Three with Buddhism Activism Democracy in Myanmar (Video)
• At the end of the workshop, you introduced your friends (Video)

You also contributed richly to last year's workshop:
Bhante Revata Dhamma: The Nomad Monk (Videos recorded in 2020, brought together by Linda Hartling on December 3, 2020)

   

Christine de Michele, North Carolina, U.S.A.

Dignity (2020): "Equity and a good life for all living beings."

Thank you so much for bringing your amazing art to our workshop every year since 2014, dear Christine! How happy we are that Anna Strout brought you to us!

Thank you so much for your contribution to this workshop:
Christine de Michele Sings About the Black Community's Significance for Jazz Music on Day Two of this Workshop, in Honor of Tony Gaskew's Talk the Day Before (Video)

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dearest Christine, I will never forget how you lifted our spirits with just your voice, without words, in an interlude during our 2016 workshop!

   

Christine Marie Katas, Utah, U.S.A.

Christine Marie Katas is a media psychology professional and founder of Voices for Dignity, an organization that promotes online kindness and compassion, and that contributes resources and advocacy for survivors of humiliation and oppression such as human trafficking, spiritual abuse, public humiliation, etc.
She is a survivor of cult-based human trafficking herself.

   

Donna Fujimoto, Osaka, Japan

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Donna explained, "To me it means learning about the plight of others — not just second-hand through reading or documentaries--but by meeting with those who have lived experience and they can open our collective eyes to what is happening in our world."

Dear Donna, we are privileged to be connected with you! You kindly joined us in our 2014 Dignity Conference in Chiang Mai and, together with your husband, in our 2017 Dignity Conference in India. We miss you! Welcome back!  

   

Danielle Coon, New York City

We are very glad that we could honor MC-ICCCR's director, our dear Peter Coleman, with our Lifetime Commitment Award this year!

Dearest Danielle, ever since you took over as Associate Director of the Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation & Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR) in 2015, you grew very close to our hearts! What a beacon of dignity you are! We are deeply grateful to you for your untiring ongoing loving support!

   

David Yamada, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

David C. Yamada is the recipient of the 2015 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award. David is a professor of law and director of the New Workplace Institute at Suffolk University Law School in Boston. David is a globally recognized scholar and authority on workplace bullying and worker dignity. At our annual workshops, he has frequently shared topics such as workplace bullying and abuse, dignity at work, and therapeutic jurisprudence. See this article in the journal of the American Bar Association, "David Yamada is fighting to end workplace bullying," by Amanda Robert, ABA Journal, December 1, 2021.

Thank you, dear David, for being a beacon of dignity in the world, a pillar of our global dignity work, and a pillar of this workshop series since 2007! We CELEBRATE you as the new Director of the World Dignity University initiative! HOORAY!

Thank you so much for your important contribution to this book:
"Growing Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies: Without Falling Prey to Neoliberal Norms." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael Britton, and Linda Hartling. Chapter 2. (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

THANK YOU so much for your many contributions alo to this workshop! You were part of Dignilogue 3, you hosted Dignilogue 4, and you offered a Bonus Session for "newcomers" together with Janet Gerson!

Dignilogue 3: Reframing Global Leadership in a Dignitarian Context (Video)
Yamada, David C. (2021). "Therapeutic Jurisprudence: Foundations, Expansion, and Assessment." In University of Miami Law Review, 75 (3), p. 660 (Pdf)

Dignilogue 4: Yamada, David C. (2021). Advancing the Promise of the World Dignity University, November 2021 (version 1) (Video 1 | Video 2)

Thank you, dear David, for your wonderful post-2020-workshop blog "A welcomed online workshop helps to conclude a challenging year" (Link | Pdf). In 2020, you were a pillar of Dignilogue 1 and Dignilogue 2 in particular! And we had the privilege of enjoying your wonderful musical voice (Text | Video)! We have no words to thank you!

Thank you sharing this work in 2020, dear David:
• "Should Public Policy Center on Society’s Well-Being?" by David Yamada, The American Commentator, October 2020 (Pdf)
• Yamada, David C. (2019). "Therapeutic Jurisprudence, Intellectual Activism and Legislation." In The Methodology and Practice of Therapeutic Jurisprudence, edited by Nigel Stobbs, Lorana Bartels, and Michel Vols. Chapter 5. Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press. (Pdf)
• Yamada, David C. (2018). "On Anger, Shock, Fear, and Trauma: Therapeutic Jurisprudence as a Response to Dignity Denials in Public Policy." In International Journal of Law and Psychiatry. doi: 10.1016/j.ijlp.2018.06.009 (Pdf). This article asserts that when policymaking processes, outcomes, and implementations stoke fear, anxiety, and trauma, they often lead to denials of human dignity.

   

Elaine Meis, New York City

Elaine Meis is a political activist and a member of the New York City Dignity Now Group.

Thank you so much, dear Elaine, for being a pillar of the Digniplanning Team for this workshop and for hosting Dignilogue 5 both in 2020 and 2021!

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Elaine, Linda and I have recently discussed that we share a loving and tender affection for all living creatures, including us humans, something that can move us to tears when we see the beauty of it. For me, I can say that the joy of connection and loving care is what keeps me alive. Not all people seem to share this affection, YOU have it! We CELEBRATE you!

2020: Continuing Connections: Dignity Now Groups for Developing Ongoing Dialogue (Video)

   

Elenor Richter-Lyonette, St. Sulpice, Switzerland

What does "dignity through solidarity" mean to you?
"Dignity through solidarity means to me that I am ready to listen and to express support. This may be practical support or simple empathy."

A very warm welcome to our workshop, dear Elenor!

   

Ella Nygård Autti, Rovaniemi, Finland

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Ella explained, "The actions, words and language I take and use every day towards my fellow human beings."

In our 2020 workshop, Ella defined dignity as follows, "Dignity for me is very practical, treating other people with respect and with acceptance.
"

Ella Nygård Autti is filled with a desire to help healthcare organizations to have mutually respectful and humane work cultures. She is currently undertaking PhD research into shame and humiliation in healthcare work communities at the University of Lapland, Finland. She aims to pursue an understanding of the systems and dialogues that humiliate or cause shame in work settings. She holds a master's degree in social sciences and has a background in marketing and communications.

Dearest Ella, what a gift you are to our dignity work! We simply love what you have created!


   

Emmanuel Ndahimana, Kigali, Rwanda

• Thank you, dear Emmanuel Ndahimana, for contributing to this Dignilogue with your most valuable reflections (Video | Video recorded on November 13, 2021 | Pdf prepared on December 9, 2021 | Pdf prepared on November 19, 2021)

Thank you also so much for your wonderful "Message to the World" (Video | Video recorded on November 30, 2021)!

• Thank you for writing to us so kindly on December 12, 2020 (Video| Bishop Desmond Tutu Explains Ubuntu Video):
"The theme of the conference is very inspiring. Indeed transforming humiliation into a pandemic of dignity for every one should be a mission of all of us. As someone said, we are one, united by our essence, by our humanity, our Ubuntu. We are also different by our forms, the circumstances of our developments, our experiences, our colors, talents. These differences make the creation even more artistic, beautiful in the Planet garden. That perspective should lead us to more admiration and respect rather than humiliation and conflicts. Not easy!! Félicité is among the few who have reached that level of maturity and understanding. She has left to all of us a living example that even big challenges can be overcome. Making this known is a good contribution to the world. We are grateful to Father Jean D'Amour who has offered this example, grateful to HDHS for making Félicité an example of humanity, dignity and compassion!"

• The African Ubuntu philosophy says "I am because of you, we are because of each other," "Umunthu ngamunthu ngabantu": "A person is a person through other people"!
• We thank Bishop Desmond Tutu for his explanation of ubuntu. We are grateful to both Emmanuel Ndahimana and Bishop Desmond Tutu for their wonderful support to our dignity work! Bishop Tutu kindly contributed with the Foreword to Evelin's book on love in 2010, and Emmanuel Ndahimana hosted our 2015 Dignity Conference in Kigali, Rwanda, June 2–5, 2015, that we held as a tribute to Felicitas Niyitegeka in the spirit of the United Nations agenda towards "A Life of Dignity for All," and in the spirit of umuganda, "coming together in common purpose" (the traditional practice of communities self-solving their problems).
• We thank, furthermore, scholar Joy Ndwandwe for explaining ubuntu on 26th April 2013 in our 2013 Annual Dignity Conference in Stellenbosch, South Africa, that was titled ‘Search for dignity’, April 24–27, 2013.

   

Evelin Lindner, Global

"Dignity, for me, is the ability to stand tall with open arms, lovingly welcoming all others as equals in worthiness."

• Synopsis: From Humiliation to Dignity: For a Future of Global Solidarity. Lake Oswego, OR: World Dignity University Press, Dignity Press, 2022 (Pdf)
From Humiliation to Dignity: For a Future of Global Solidarity – The Coronavirus Pandemic as Opportunity in the Midst of Suffering (Original | Pdf), in InterViews: An Interdisciplinary Journal in Social Sciences, 7 (1), 2020, pp. 30–50, doi: 10.36061/IV.7.1.20.30.50
Bringing Dignity to Globalisation: A Psychologist’s Personal Experience as a Global Citizen - Evelin Lindner’s Global Life. Book proposal created in response to an invitation by Louise Sundararajan, Series Editor of the Palgrave Studies in Indigenous Psychology, 2019

   

Gavin Andersson, South Africa

Adjunct Professor, University of Cape Town Graduate School of Business
Co-Founder, Unbounded Academy
Co-Founder Ancient Wisdom Africa
Director, InvestRural Academy

   

Gay Rosenblum-Kumar, New York City

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Gay, your support for our dignity work since 2001 has been immensely enriching and of exceptional substance! Every fall, when I was in New York City, we met in the UN cafeteria for lunch and we shared past year's insights! And you joined our workshops in 2004 2007, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, and 2021!

Dear Gay, I learned so much each time you invited me to share my reflections:
How Are Dignity and Humiliation Relevant in Our Lives, Our Societies, and for the United Nations?
The UN Interagency Framework Team for Preventive Action cordially invited to a brown bag lunch event on Tuesday, November 26, 2013, 1pm – 2.30 pm at 1 UN Plaza (DC-1), 20th Floor Conference Room. The host is Gay Rosenblum-Kumar.
Understanding and Addressing Humiliation and Conflict
Brown Gag Lunch at the UN Interagency Framework Team for Preventive Action, December 2, 2010, 12-2.30 pm, convened at the United Nations, New York City, U.S.A., organized by Gay Rosenblum-Kumar
See pictures.
• These talks connected back to Humiliation, Conflict Management, and Policy Making, brown bag lunch at the Governance and Public Administration Branch, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, on December 15, 2004.

   

Georg Geckler, Hameln (Hamelin), Germany

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Georg explained, "I try to be in solidarity especially to those people who need it most."

Georg in an engineer who worked in the oil and gas business and in planning depositories for radioactive waste. He is now helping Yezidi refugees from Iraq in Germany. He is a member of the DignityNowHameln and ambassador for the EU climate pact. Together with friends and relatives, Georg creates videos that offer established knowledge and hopeful visions to audiences wherever this is wished for or needed. His message is: Stop climate warming and burning fossil fuels and instead foster renewable energy, stop wars and humiliation and instead work for dignity world wide. Children and students should learn in dignity, because this prevents them from learning to harm other persons, which, in turn, can help to bring dignity to the world in the future.

In the 2020 workshop, Georg described dignity as follows, "For me dignity is a condition of a person who is respected and can live in freedom, peace, with good nutrition, a safe home, and without physical or psychical violation. Dignity could be the attitude of a person that is recognized by others as a proud and decent human being."

Thank you for for your important messages in 2020!
• "Message to the World" (Text | Video recorded on November 30, 2020)
Reduce Overproduction! Hameln, Germany, November 2020

Thank you, dear Georg, also for your amazing work with our DignityNowHameln group, since 2019!
Dignity Now: Hameln Removes Plastic Waste from the Banks of its River Weser (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel, recorded in September 2021, finalized on November 25, 2021)
• The Dignity Now Hameln Group sings Dona Nobis Pacem ("Grant Us Peace" in Latin) in the Chapel of Wangelist near Hameln (Hamelin) on November 8, 2021
2020:
Dignity Now: Hameln Presents Good Ideas from the Past and the Future for a More Sustainable Future. Thoughts Are Unchained (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel, recorded in October and November 2020, finalized on November 21, 2020)
Die Gedanken sind Frei / Thoughts are Unchained sung by the DignityNowHameln group
This is the contribution of the DignityNowHameln group that was recorded in October and November 2020, and finalized on November 21, 2020 (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel)

   

Grace Feuerverger, Toronto, Canada

"Dignity: compassion for oneself and others, reconciliation, an open heart and mind."

Message from Evelin: How wonderful that our dear Sharon Burde brought us together in 2002, dear Grace, and that I had the privilege of paying you a visit in your home in Toronto on August 26, 2002! What a gift you have been to us in our workshops in New York City in 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, and 2016, and our 2009 Dignity Conference in Hawai'i!

Thank you for your important work, dear Grace!
• Feuerverger, Grace (2001). Oasis of Dreams: Teaching and Learning Peace in a Jewish-Palestinian Village in Israel. London, New York: Routledge/Falmer.
The "School For Peace": A Conflict Resolution Program in a Jewish-Palestinian Village (2005)

   

Hayal Köksal, Istanbul, Turkey

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Hayal explained, "Individuals must learn how to be dignified persons in time but if this is realized altogether, with the support of others, the influence will be larger and the speed of success will be higher."

In the 2020 workshop, Hayal described dignity as follows, "The quality of being worthy of honor or respect. Being satisfied with self and working to bring sistership/brotherhood to the world people for the sake of happy and healthy future generations."

Dearest Hayal, we will never forget the loving care with which you hosted our 2010 Dignity Conference in Istanbul, Turkey! And then you came to New York City for our 2014 workshop! We are deeply thankful to you!

Thank you so much, dear Hayal, for the "Message to the World" of 2021 (Video | Video recorded on November 4, 2021), and your 2020 "Message to the World" that you recorded on November 28, 2020 (Video)! And thank you for sharing your paper on peace training titled Training Peace-Focused and More Qualified New Generation: Turkey Case, 2019.

   

Janet Gerson, New York City

Dr. Janet C. Gerson is the recipient of the 2018 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award.

What does "dignity through solidarity" mean to you? Janet's answer:
"Dignity is the core value of a moral society. Dignity is taken to be inherent in each and every person. Entitlements, in contrast, are what governments and societies give through laws, policies, and practices. These can be both given and also taken away, unlike dignity. Dignity is operationalized through respect, the ethical principle for interpersonal interactions. From a relational conception based on dignity, justice is what each person is due and what we owe each other (Dale Snauwaert). Justice is dynamic, always balancing moral and ethical norms with practical challenges and institutional (stabilizing) formulations. Solidarity is based on the moral understanding that we know that we need each other, that human beings are interconnected and interdependent. Solidarity can be operationalized as an ethical interactive principle like respect, but how is it further enacted? From a dignity-based perspective, solidarity must be grass-roots, inclusive, communitive, and based on willing cooperation of all those involved. It is necessary to state this because solidarity has often been imposed, engaging a domination-and-control model of social-political organizing.
Solidarity is possible through dialogic means engaging deliberation and consensus-based decision-making. In reality, solidarity is often made up of a willingness to participate together based on mutual respect and understanding. Rawls stated that reasoned argumentation can lead to a congruence of opinion, a recognition that an understanding and agreement has been reached that, nevertheless, does not mean that every participant agrees 100%. Instead, it implies that despite differences that continue to be respected, a congruence of opinion has been reached thereby enabling decision-making processes to move ahead. From these, policies and courses of action can be formulated and dynamized.

In our 2020 worskhop, Janet described dignity as follows, "Dignity is inherent in each person and is operationalized interpersonally as respect. Dignity is moral autonomy in which each person is an end in herself, recognized as the author of his own story, and as a subject in society where dignity is operationalized as equality, inclusion, freedom, fulfillment and well-being. Dignity is blighted when persons are treated instrumentally as means to ends, subjected to domination, humiliation and other forms of violence."

Thank you so much, dearest Janet, for being a pillar of this workshop in so many capacities! Thank you for explaining the Connection and Reflection Groups (Video), for hosting a Bonus Session for "newcomers" together with David Yamada, as well as hosting Dignilogue 1. Thank you for your wonderful contribution to Dignilogue 3, The Interrelatedness of Dignity, Justice, Democracy, and Peace (Video), based on your recent book, Reclaimative post-conflict justice: Democratizing justice in the World Tribunal on Iraq (Cham, Switzerland: Springer International, 2021) co-authored with Dale Snauwaert!

Dr. Janet C. Gerson is a political theorist, writer, artist, and activist educator who has taught peace education, conflict processes, transformative learning, and futures envisioning. She is the Education Director of the International Institute on Peace Education (IIPE), and former Co-Director of the Peace Education Center at Teachers College, Columbia University in New York City (2001- 2010). She has collaborated with the Morton Deutsch International Center on Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR) at at Teachers College since 1996. Her research and writing focus on the interrelatedness of dignity, justice, democracy and peace.

Janet came to the talk titled Humiliation and the Roots of Violence that Evelin Lindner gave at the MD-ICCCR on December 17, 2001, 3.30 pm, upon the invitation of Betty Reardon, attended by Morton Deutsch, among others. She particiated in Evelin Lindner’s first conference that was hosted by Morton Deutsch at the MD-ICCCR in 2003, and she was part of Morton Deutsch's last project, titled Imagine a Global Human Community (Video, December 11, 2013 | transcript, see the pledge Morton Deutsch brought to the 2013 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York, December 5-6, 2013).

As a Board Member of HumanDHS, Janet co-hosts Dignity Now circles in New York City since 2015, initiated by Michael Britton with Judit Révész and Chipamong Chowdhury. The first meeting took place in Janet Gerson's NYC art gallery home on November 14, 2015, on the occasion of Gaby Saab's return to the city.

Thank you very much for your important contribution to this book:
"Reclaiming Common Bases of Human Dignity." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael Britton, and Linda Hartling. Chapter 4. (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

   

Jeyver Rodríguez Baños, Santiago, Chile

Professor Faculty of Philosophy, Temuco Catholic University
Doctor en Filosofía, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
Doctor of Philosophy, Australian Catholic University
Member of Contemporary Humanism Program

Thank you, dear Jeyver, for offering to speak about "Dignity and Epistemic Injustice and Human Dignity: A critical reflection from the Global South"!

   

Judit Révész, New York City, Geneva, Switzerland, Hungary

Message from Evelin: Dearest Judit, I will never forget the day when you welcomed me to Teachers College, Columbia University, on December 17, 2001, just before I gave the talk titled Humiliation and the Roots of Violence at 3.30 pm, upon the invitation of Betty Reardon, attended, among others, by Morton Deutsch!

Since 2001, you are a pillar of our dignity work, and since the inception of this website in 2003, you offer your time and energy to reply when people click on the "contact us" button! Over the years, you often worked late at night for us, even while holding two jobs and being a student. Words will never suffice to express our gratitude and admiration to you! Your deeply deeply thankful Evelin!

Thank you so much for your important contribution to this book:
"Full Circle: With Gratitude to Our Dearest Evelin Lindner." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael Britton, and Linda Hartling. Chapter 14. (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

   

Julian Bodnar, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada 

Mediation, Arbitration, & Conciliation Services

   

Kimberly Eriksen, Oslo, Norway

Kimberly Eriksen initiates and leads research and investigatives efforts into human rights related issues. She identifies destructive disrespect and humiliating practices and works to promote dignity, humility, compassion, and mutual respect. Se develops content and material to raise awareness to issues while simultaneously bolstering support for positive solutions. She collaborates with cross-functional and transdisciplinary researchers and investigators to advocate for the protection of fundamental human rights and dignity.

   

Larry Visser, Casselberry, Florida, U.S.A.

Founder of Dignity Dialogues
formerly LCSW (Licensed Clinical Social Worker), formerly PCIP (Payment Card Industry Professional)

Dear Larry, thank you for sharing your background with us, "I am retired from two careers. First, I worked for 25 years in social work, leading a non-profit substance abuse prevention and treatment center for much of that time. Second, I worked for 20 years in IT systems engineering and cybersecurity. I am currently working on a volunteer initiative called Dignity Dialogues which builds bridges to peace through civil dialogue that, first and foremost, honors dignity."

 

Leland "Lee" R. Beaumont, Middletown, New Jersey, U.S.A.

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Lee explained, "When we can recognize that respecting the human dignity we are each born with provides the basis for moral reasoning and daily decision making, we can unite on this common ground."

Thank you so very much, dear Lee, for your life work! We are happy that you found our work in 2007, and that you came to our workshops in 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2010! Thank you so much for sharing your valuable work over all these years!

Dear Lee, how can we ever thank you enough! As a consultant in computer networking, you have single-handedly, you have built a monumental contribution to our World Dignity University initiative!

Wisdompage: “I wonder how that works?” is the question that has propelled much of the life and career of Leland R. Beaumont. Expressed early on as an interest in science, math, engineering, and computer science, he obtained Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Electrical Engineering as he began his career at Bell Laboratories and Lucent Technologies.

• In your registration for 2021, you kindly shared an amazingly comprehensive graphical overview over the Causal Relationships Shaping Our Universe! Thank you also for sharing your ideas for future Dignilogue (Dignity + Dialogue) topics:
1) Seeking real good
2) Creating a Human Rights Olympics event
3) Moral reasoning

• Thank you for creating for us in the past years more than 60 pages of wise affirmations, a thought experiment that can help better understand the role luck plays in one's life, a course on problem finding, and on confronting tyranny. Thank you for offering an optimistic vision of the future, and a Wikiversity Possibilities curriculum.

• You wrote in 2019:
As a gift to you and the people of the world I have developed the Wisdom and the Future Research Center, where researchers are exploring the question How can we wisely create our future?
I have also developed a freely available course on Moral Reasoning."

   

Linda Hartling, Portland, Oregon, principle convener of this workshop, please see her bio further down!

Dignity? "A world without humiliation dignifies us all!"

Dearest Linda, no message of gratitude will ever be enough to express how we — the entire global dignity community — feel about your immeasurable work of love and dignity!
YOU nurtured also this workshop into being! See a round of appreciations for your efforts at the end of Day Two (Video) and at the end of Day Three of the workshop (Video). See also a message of gratitude from Evelin Lindner, recorded prior to the 2020 workshop on November 25 and December 9, 2020 (Video). And then see also a message of gratitude at the end of last year's workshop (Video), where all participants expressed their deep gratitude and admiration for your leadership, as, after all, YOU make all our workshops possible!

Thank you so much, dear Linda, for co-editing this important and most touching book, and for writing the Foreword and the final chapter:
"Moving Beyond Humiliation: A Relational Conceptualization of Human Rights." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael Britton, and Linda Hartling. Chapter 15. (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

   

Linda Longmire, Nassau County, New York, U.S.A.

Linda is Professor of Global Studies and Geography at Hofstra University, where she teaches Globalization and Human Rights, Globalization and Human Trafficking, and Women’s Studies.

   

Lucien Xavier Lombardo, Virginia, U.S.A.

Dignity (2020): "An essence of our lives that connects with its meaning and others. It exists in experience and does not need to be judged, measured or defined. Unlike justice, equality, fairness, equality, dignity does not yield to power; it is not subject to measurement; it is not based on a judgment; it is not political! Dignity is!"

Thank you, dear Lou, for kindly writing in the registration for this workshop: "Working to integrate 'dignity' into world of children. Started working career as a teacher in a maximum security prison and from there, taught for 40 years act Old Dominion University, Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice. Latest research involved implementation of UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Southern Cayuga Anne Frank Tree Project, National No Hit Zone Committee, Harriet Tubman Center for Justice and Peace, National Partnership to End Interpersonal Violence It shapes HOW teachers and learners interact with the problems and material they are studying. Doing so as co-investigators — implementing Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of Hope! Exploring how "a dignity perspective" can shape curriculum across disciplines at the college/ university level. Discussing how dignity can be integrated into the mission statements of public and private school systems! What would it mean? How would it look?

Dearest Lou, we are privileged that you found our work in 2013! Thank you so much for sharing your work since then at each of our workshops, dear Lucien, and also this time!
• "Message to the World — Learning about Dignity" (Text | Video recorded on December 5, 2020)
Thank you also for:
Human Dignity and Childhood, Workshop with Leadership Team, Auburn Enlarged City School District, Auburn, NY, November 18, 2019
Finding My Way to Questions about Violence, prepared for Senior Scholar Lecture, College of Arts and Letters, November 4, 2006... Dr. Lombardo's Journey: It's Never Been Just Academic — Was It Following Me Around?

   

Maggie O'Neill, Ireland and England

What a gift, dear Maggie, that esteemed Ruth Lister brought you to us in 2005, and that you came all across the Atlantic to our workshops in New York City in 2005, 2006, 2007, 2012, and 2013! How WONDERFUL to have you with us now again!

Thank you so much, dear Maggie, for your contribution to Dignilogue 1 of our 2020 workshop: Dignity Studies: Reimagining Learning in of World of Crises (Video)

Thank you for sharing your work, dear Maggie:
Participation Arts and Social Action in Research (PASAR): Theatre Making and Walking in Research with Migrant Women, with Umut Erel, Ereni Kaptani, Tracey Reynolds and Maggie O’Neill, a short film by Marcia Chandra that shares the work and importantly the process, (Video | Pdf comment | PASAR)

Walking Conversations with Maggie O’Neill, Arpad Szakaloczai, Ger Mullally, the Dingle Creativity and Innovation Hub and students and teachers from the Pobalscoil Chorca Dhuibhne. Walking is a mundane activity but also fundamental to our way of being and sociality, taking a walk with someone is a powerful way of communicating about experience, we can become attuned and connected in a lived embodied way with the feelings and lived experience of another. Pioneering Anthropologist Tim Ingold talks about walking as the ‘art of paying attention’. Walking opens a space for dialogue, and embodied knowledge and experience can be shared, it is ‘convivial’ in the senses described above. This short film by Jan Haaken and Maciej Klich shares this work in progress and in process on walking conversations and the walking classroom. (Video | Pdf comment)

   

Mara Alagic, Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kansas, U.S.A.

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Mara explained, "Supporting each other, globally and locally, ubuntu, being part of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies ... "

In 2020, Mara defined dignity as follows: "A way of human existence..."

Mara Alagic (2021)
A Pivotal Moment for the Future of World Dignity University (Video | Text)
Contribution to Dignilogue 4 of the 2021 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Virtual at Columbia University, New York City, December 9 – 11, 2021.

Dear Mara, we are so thankful to Adair Linn Nagata for bringing you to us in 2008! Thank you for being a pillar of our work since then, and for being a core member of the Digni-Planning Team for this workshop!

Thank you so much for your contribution to Dignilogue 1 in the 2020 workshop: Dignity Studies: Reimagining Learning in of World of Crises (Video)

   

Mariana I. Vergara Esquivel, New Jersey, U.S.A., and Ecuador

Thank you so much for establishing a Ruku Kausay World Dignity University Amazonian Branch in the Rainforest of Ecuador in 2012 together with Evelin Lindner! And thank you for being such a wonderful host to Evelin also in Quito in 2012!

Welcome to our workshop, dear Mariana!

Thank you so much for your important contribution to this book:
"World Dignity University Initiative in the Amazon Rainforest: A Transformational Learning Experience." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael Britton, and Linda Hartling. Chapter 13. (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

   

Martha Eddy, New York City

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Martha explained, "Compassion compassion compassion and truthful dialogue."

Dignity (2020): "Dignity is internal — I know I have value and purpose. external — I can dignify others by being caring and curious without judgement."

Dearest Martha, what a gift that Pascal Rocha and Karen Bradley brought you to us in 2010! Thank you for offering a DigniStretch Activity to us on Day Two of this workshop (Video) and your "Message to the World" on Day Three (Video)! Thank you for pre-recording your DigniCalm and DigniStretch activities on December 4, 2020! Thank you also for contributing with your Rise Up: Cancer Survivor/Thriver Dance, created on September 29, 2020!

As introduction to your work, you recommend How to Be Alone...
Thank you for your profound global dignity work: Somatic Resources for Stressful Times | Global Water Dances Mission | Global Water Dances (GWD) YouTube Channel | Global Water Dance: Documentary, 3 minutes | Global Water Dance, 12 minutes

   

Mechthild "Mecke" Nagel, Cortland, New York, Germany

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Mecke explained, "A positive peace approach and selfless service to others."

Dignity (2020): "compassionate way with all there is."

Dear Mechthild, how wonderful that Lucien Lombardo brought you to us in 2016!
Thank you so much for your "Message to the World" that you shared on Day Three of the workshop (Video)!

Congratulations on your important work!
• Nagel, Mechthild (2018). "Policing Families: The Many-Headed Hydra of Surveillance", in Feminism and Psychology, 17 (2), pp. 2–11.

   

Michael Boyer, Hameln (Hamelin), Germany

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Michael responded, "Solidarity with your fellows should prerequisite dignified relations."

Dignity (2020): "Dignism!"

Thank you, dear Michael, for your loving support for dignity and your amazing work with our DignityNowHameln group! Thank you for your Digniworld initiative that you created in 2019 (Video): Digniworld WordPress | Digniworld Facebook | Digniworld Twitter | Digniworld Instagram | World Dignity Movement (on YouTube)

All these lovely contributions to our 2021 workshop from Hameln came true due to your untiring support:
Dignity Now: Hameln Removes Plastic Waste from the Banks of its River Weser (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel, recorded in September 2021, finalized on November 25, 2021)
• The Dignity Now Hameln Group sings Dona Nobis Pacem ("Grant Us Peace" in Latin) in the Chapel of Wangelist near Hameln (Hamelin) on November 8, 2021
Dear Michael, thank you for devising a lovely "script" for the introduction of the Hameln group during Dignilogue 5 of our workshop: Evelin describes the Group > Evelin to Michael > Michael to Regina > Regina to Andrea > Film - BUND Plastic Action > Andrea to Georg > Georg to Claudia > Claudia to Gisela > Gisela to Dorothee > Dorothee to Andreas > back to Evelin greeting Zuzana Lučkay Mihalčinová > Dona Nobis Pacem.

Thank you also for your wonderful contributions to our 2020 workshop:
Dignity Now: Hameln Presents Good Ideas from the Past and the Future for a More Sustainable Future. Thoughts Are Unchained (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel, recorded in October and November 2020, finalized on November 21, 2020)
This is the contribution of the DignityNowHameln group that was recorded in October and November 2020, and finalized on November 21, 2020 (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel)
See more in detail:
• 01 Marienhof (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel)
• 02 Unverpackt Laden (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel)
• 03 Song Die Gedanken sind Frei / Thoughts are Unchained (World Dignity Movement channel | HumanDHS channel)
• Dear Michael, thank you also for your wonderful vocal interlude! (Video at the end)
• Hameln Sings (all vocal interludes brought together) (Video)

   

Michael Britton, Highland Park, New Jersey, U.S.A.

Dearest Michael! What a gift it is to have you as a core pillar of our dignity work since 2006! Thank you so much for kindly accepting that we honored you with our 2017 Lifetime Commitment Award!

In the annual Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict that takes place each year at Columbia University, you hold the Don Klein Celebration Lecture in place of the lecture that Don Klein held each year until he passed away in 2007, titled The Humiliation Dynamic: Looking Back... Looking Forward

In 2021, this was Michael Britton's Don Klein Celebration Lecture of 2021 (Video | Video recorded on December 5, 2021, edited by Linda Hartling on December 6, 2021 | Video recorded on November 30, 2021, edited by Linda Hartling on December 1, 2021 | Pdf from PowerPoint)

In 2020, this was Michael Britton's Don Klein Celebration Lecture: Video | Video recorded on October 18, 2020 | Video recorded on October 18, 2020, and edited by Linda Hartling on December 3, 2020
All of your Don Klein Celebration Lectures since 2007 are listed here

Message from Evelin Lindner: Dear Michael, I will never forget how we met on November 14, 2006, when you kindly attended my presentation titled Humiliation and the Roots of Violence: Human Conflict in a Globalizing World, to which our dear Philip Brown had invited me at the New Jersey Center for Character Education, Center for Applied Psychology, Rutgers University, New Jersey. I still have some pictures.

Thank you so much, dear Michael, for co-editing this important and most touching book, and for writing the Introduction:
Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael F. Britton, and Linda M. Hartling. Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019.

   

Michael Perlin, New York City, New Jersey, U.S.A.

Dear Michael! What a pillar of our dignity work you have been since our dear George Woods brought you to us in 2006! Thank you so much for kindly accepting that we honored you with our 2012 Lifetime Commitment Award!

Michael L. Perlin is Professor of Law Emeritus at New York Law School (NYLS), where he was director of NYLS’s Online Mental Disability Law Program, and director of NYLS’s International Mental Disability Law Reform Project in its Justice Action Center. He is co-founder of Mental Disability Law and Policy Associates, and has written 34 books and over 300 articles on all aspects of mental disability law, focusing primarily on issues related to criminal law and procedure. He has litigated at every court level from police court to the US Supreme Court, and has done advocacy work on every continent. He is the honorary life president of the International Society for Therapeutic Jurisprudence and a member of that society’s current Board of Trustees. He is also a member of the Lawrence Township (NJ) Community Concert Band, the Temple University Night Owls band, and the board of directors of the Washington Crossing (NJ) Audubon Society.

Dear Michael, you wrote about dignity: "I have been writing about this for years. See my articles, among others, my chapter "Dignity and Therapeutic Jurisprudence: How We Can Best End Shame and Humiliation," in Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations 113 (Chipamong Chowdhury and Michael Britton eds. 2019) (Dignity Press); See more here."

Thank you so much for sharing:
• "In These Times of Compassion When Conformity's in Fashion": How Therapeutic Jurisprudence Can Root out Bias, Limit Polarization and Support Vulnerable Persons in the Legal Process (Video 2021)
• “Therapeutic Jurisprudence: Foundations, Expansion, and Assessment,” University of Miami Law Review (2021)
• "Message to the World" (Text | Video | Video recorded on December 7, 2020)

Thank you in particular for your important contribution to this book:
• "Dignity and Therapeutic Jurisprudence: How We Can Best End Shame and Humiliation." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael F. Britton, and Linda M. Hartling. Chapter 6. (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

   

Azad Mohammad Abul Kalam, Dhaka, Bangladesh

"Dignity: Ensure the rights of the people and treat people equally as well as equity."

Dearest Azad! How wonderful that we first met you in our 2006 Dignity Conference in Costa Rica, and then you came to Chiang Mai in Northern Thailand for our 2014 Dignity Conference! How wonderful to have this long-standing loving connection with you!

   

Monty Marshall, Virginia, U.S.A.

Monty G. Marshall, Ph.D., produces global societal-systems data and analyses through a for-profit corporation, Societal-Systems Research Inc., and a not-for-profit corporation, the Center for Systemic Peace, which continues to provide the Web vehicle to disseminate data resources and reports as in the past. Until 2010, he was a Research Professor at the School of Public Policy George Mason University and a Senior Research Associate, Center for International Development and Conflict Management (CIDCM) at the University of Maryland, College Park. He has established and until recently directed the Center for Systemic Peace (CSP), a not-for-profit social science research enterprise focusing on global systems analysis and, especially, the problem of political violence within the context of complex societal-system development processes. Since August 1998, he has served as a Core Member of the State Failure Task Force, a data-driven global research project mandated by the Office of the Vice President of the United States, and a Senior Research Associate with CIDCM.

   

Nimrod Sheinman, Tel Aviv

Nimrod Sheinman B.Sc., N.D. is an Integrative Naturopathic Physician and one of Israel's most experienced and well respected mind-body authorities. He is the founder of Israel's Center for Mindfulness in Education (2013), and an active participant in The Van Leer Jerusalem Institute's group for Spirituality in Education. He was the co-founder of Israel's Center for Mind-Body Medicine (1998), and past director of the mind-body unit, Integrative Medicine Department, Rabin Medical Center, Israel. [read more]

   

Noriko Ishihara, Tokyo, Japan

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Noriko explained, "By connecting truly with others, we can grow trust, love, and bonds with each other."

In our 2020 workshop, Noriko described dignity as follows, "Having our human rights respected and respecting others' rights at the same time."

In the registration to our 2022 workshop, Noriko kindly wrote: "I’m an applied linguist based in Japan, exploring how to make a bridge between intercultural communication, language learning, and global citizenship. I research linguistic politeness with a focus on how to integrate intercultural understanding and peace education in language learning and language teacher education. As a language teacher and teacher educator, I would like to go beyond just technicality of teaching grammar, vocabulary, etc. to integrate issues of linguistic (in)equality and social (in)justices in relation to linguistic rights into the curriculum."

We thank our dear peace linguist Francisco Gomes de Matos for bringing you to us in 2016, dear Noriko, and it was wonderful to have you with us in our 2016 workshop! Thank you for the many gifts with which you have contributed to our work since then! For instance, you wrote a wonderful chapter in this book:
"The Language of Respect and Dignity for Intercultural Understanding and Conflict Resolution: Application to Diplomacy and Education." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael Britton, and Linda Hartling. Chapter 5. (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

Thank you so much for sharing the artistic expressions of your students from July 16, 2020: "Different Color — Same Human!"
You kindly wrote on April 8, 2019: "This week I’m starting a new course on art-based language teaching. I intend to expose my students (prospective teachers) to various forms of language-mediated artworks especially with social activism or humanitarian themes. Language learning/teaching can be rather dry if grammar or accuracy is focused too much, but some inspiring content on human rights can truly engage students while they use/learn language effectively through that content. Also, social activism isn’t as prevalent here in Japan but I’m hoping that Japanese and international students in this class will learn together and from each other. This, I’d say, is one of the concrete ideas that came to me out of attending your NY workshop in 2016. I’m hoping to take this to a national conference in language teaching in the fall. With my love and gratitude for inspirations ... Noriko"

Thank you also for sharing:
• "Teaching to Develop Learners’ Sociocultural Competence," by Noriko Ishihara, Hosei University, Columbia University Teachers College Tokyo, Soleado, Spring, 2011
• Ishihara, Noriko (2017). "Teaching Pragmatics in Support of Learner Subjectivity and Global Communicative Needs: A Peace Linguistics Perspective." In Idee in form@zione, 6 (5), pp. 17–32. doi: 10.4399/97888548998652

 

Nora Alfano, Punta Gorda, Florida, U.S.A.

Nora Alfano is a retired teacher, dedicated to fostering the dignity of the disabled through education of the students and the community. She has promoted social inclusion through sports as a Special Olympics volunteer. Nora has a B.S. in Education, Special Education from Fitchburg State University.

   

Omkareshwar Pathak, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

Assistant Professor of Law at Jagran Lakecity University, Jagran Lakecity University.

Omkareshwar Pathak is a legal professional and an academician who graduated from Rajiv Gandhi National University of Law in Punjab, India, specializing in Criminal Laws. Thereafter, he did a LL.M. in Intellectual Property Laws from the National Law Institute University (JLU) in Bhopal. As an academician, he coordinated activities under the Center of Law, Policy, and Good Governance at JLU. At present, he is coordinating the activities of the Centre for Business and Intellectual Property Laws at JLU's Faculty of Law. He has also actively participated and contributed to conferences across the country. Furthermore, he worked as faculty convenor of the II SAARCLAW-JLU Moot Court Competition, organized by Jagran Lakecity University-School of Law in 2020. He is an active member of various committees.

Omkareshwar Pathak insists on being called Om. He is a minimalist with keen interest in travelling and likes to go on unplanned long drives on weekends and tasting regional cuisines across India. He is inclined towards constitutional law, IPR and clinical legal education.

Thank you, dear Omkareshwar, that you attended Evelin's Igniting Minds lecture on 10th September 2020!

   

Peter Barus, Jacksonville, Whitingham, Vermont, U.S.A.

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Peter responded by saying, "Connection. Being 'out here' with you."

In the 2020 workshop, Peter described dignity as "a question in which to live."

We are very glad, dear Peter, that our dear Howard Richards brought you to our global dignity community!

Thank you so much for sharing your reflections during the coffee break of Day Three of this workshop (Video) and for sharing more thoughts at the end of the workshop (Video)!

Thank you also very much for your touching and profound "Message to the World" in 2020!

   

Peter Coleman, New York City

Peter Coleman is the recipient of the 2020 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award. It is a great honor to have him contribute with his crucially important work to this workshop!

Peter Coleman is a co-sponsor of this event and our anchor at Columbia University. Without his support, there would be no workshop. He is a distinguished contributor since the inception of our dignity community since 2001, together with Morton Deutsch. It is a great joy and immense honor for us that he is willing to give us his time this December. Peter and his team are a shining example of putting ideas into practice, practice that transcends international and institutional boundaries. Our relationship with Columbia University is one model for our WDUi of working in concert with a degree-granting institution, rather than in competition.

   

Peter Pollard, Hatfield, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

What does "dignity through solidarity" mean to you?
"I think it speaks to the notion that Dignity must be extended universally and unconditionally. While embracing a commitment to accountability for harmful actions, we must resist the impulse to "otherize" those who threaten or cause harm to us and those we love. Together, we must commit to humanizing those we disagree with or find threatening, while challenging harmful behaviors."

In the registration for this workshop, Peter wrote:
My work has been focused on supporting dignity and healing for those who have been exposed to violence and trauma, with a particular focus on males.
Several simple (though certainly not simple to implement), trauma-responsive guidelines for working with males have emerged. Most relate to emotional and physical safety:
• Promote dignity by eliminating shaming as a tool to motivate change.
• Provide males cover for walking in the door. Frame services around initially establishing safe, meaningful relationships related to something other than victimization.
• In our families and circles, self-consciously support norm changes in rigidity about masculinity. Expand the emotional survival options for men when they feel vulnerable or face conflict.
• Explore the many ways that fear has been an historic driver of harmful personal interactions, social policy and laws.
• Increase knowledge about positive, evidence-based, alternative solutions to motivate changes in behavior and encourage healing.
• Advise less. Listen more
"I believe the quest for dignity is the foundation of all emotions, behaviors and actions — both positive and harmful. When dignity is secure, the impulse to deflect vulnerability through dominance or violence diminishes. Openness to nuanced ideas becomes safe.

In the 2020 workshop, Peter described dignity as "positive self-regard — a birth right."

We are so glad, dear Peter, that Donna Hicks brought you to us, and we thank you for joining us in our 2018 and 2020 workshops! Thank you for sharing:
1in6 Thursday: "Good" and "Evil"...Not So Fast, by Peter Pollard, Joyful Heart Foundation, March 22, 2012 (Pdf)
1in6 Thursday: Decriminalizing Trauma: Some New Alternatives to “Fight, Flight or Freeze,” by Peter Pollard, Joyful Heart Foundation, October 23, 2014 (Pdf)
• "Fighting a Contagious Disease in Boston," by Peter Pollard, Social Innovations Journal, December 4, 2017 (Pdf)

   

Philip Brown, Colorado Springs, Colorado, and New Jersey, U.S.A.

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Phil explained, "We need each other to build and maintain social cohesion rooted in a just, fair, and caring vision of civilization. Solidarity must be defined in a way that is distinguished from a tribalistic approach to survival."

In the 2020 workshop, Phil defined dignity as follows, "Opportunities for genuine connection with other's humanity under the umbrella of egalitarian principles and respect for all sentient beings."

Dr. Philip Brown is the recipient of the 2016 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award. He is a Coach for the National School Climate Center, and is President of the newly reorganized International Center for Assault Prevention.

Thank you so much, dear Phil, for hosting Dignilogue 3 of this workshop, and for contributing to Dignilogue 5 with your important contribution:
Dignifying the Individual Has Both an Interpersonal and Institutional Context and Dimension: Solidarity can happen for good or evil purposes; without prosocial core anchors, it can lead in the wrong direction (Video | PowerPoint)

Phil Brown is a developmental psychologist who has worked to support K-12 education for more than 45 years. He has been part of the HumanDHS network since his doctoral committee chair, Don Klein, invited him in 2004. He is a devotee of intentional networking. He currently serves as President of the International Center for Assault Prevention and as a senior consultant for the National School Climate Center. His special areas of interest, study, and research are the conditions and work that is necessary to support prosocial school cultures, where character, caring, fairness, and equity are equally important as academic achievement.

Thank you, dear Phil, for being a pillar of our dignity work since 2004, when our esteemed Don Klein brought you to us. Thank for joining our 2004 workshop and for accepting that we honored you with our 2016 Lifetime Commitment Award! In 2008, you contributed to the Special Symposium Issue of Experiments in Education, "Humiliation in the Academic Setting", published by the S.I.T.U. Council of Educational Research. Professor D. Raja Ganesan, the editor of this Special Symposium Issue, has kindly prepared a "Message to the World" for this workshop on November 10, 2021.

Thank you for sharing:
Summary of a Human Rights Based Child Protection Prevention and Early Intervention Program "Empowering Children, Parents and Schools to Be Safe, Strong and Free", The International Center for Assault Prevention (ICAP), October 2020

Thank you in particular for your important contribution to this book:
• "School Discipline: A Prosocial Perspective." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael F. Britton, and Linda M. Hartling. Chapter 8. (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

   
 

Raj Patel

   

Qin Shao, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., China

How can we ever thank Michael Perlin enough, dear Qin, for bringing us together in 2014! Thank you for your loving and dignifying support!

Thank you so much for sharing, dear Qin!
The Pursuit of Transitional Justice from Below: A Case Study from Shanghai, by Qin Shao, 2020

   

Rebecca (Becky) Tabaczynski, Lexington, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

What does "dignity through solidarity" mean to you?
"When people are joined together, they create a barrier to humiliation and support dignity."

We are so happy to have you with us in our dignity community, dear Becca! Thank you for sharing your research on conspiracy theories in Dignilogue 2! The Threat of Conspiracy Theories (Video | Video recorded on November 29, 2021)

Rebecca (Becky) Tabaczynski holds a certificate in Global Post-Disaster Studies from the Center for Rebuilding Sustainable Communities after Disasters, under the Direction of Adenrele Awotona, at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. In 2017, Becky became connected to HumanDHS as student in the course: Human Dignity, Human Rights, and Sustainable Post-Disaster Reconstruction. Over the last year she has been donating her research skills as a gift to HumanDHS by studying conspiracy theories. She has a bachelors degree in nursing and masters degrees in counseling and business administration.

   

Redjane Andrade, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil

Thank you, dear Redjane, for your dignifying presence in this world! We are glad that our dear Peace Linguist Professor Francisco Gomes de Matos brought you to us!
Congratulations! You were among the finalists of the Grade 10 Educator Award, July 16, 2020!

You kindly wrote on November 16, 2021: "...we have here a song call Felicidade with Caetano Veloso as a singer, and I put new lyrics call Dignity, and change the lyrics to open the eyes about dignity life.”

   

Robert Anderson, New York City

What does "dignity through solidarity" mean to you? "Gaining awareness of multiple perspective on dignity and building global capacity."

Dear Robert, what a gift you are to our dignity work! It is such a privilege to have your support!

   

Sam Manickam, Mysore, India

Professor in Clinical Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, J.S.S. Medical College & Hospital, Ramanuja Road, Mysore, India

Leister Sam Sudheer Manickam kindly wrote on February 11, 2017:

Hi, I found the concept of WDU on the website. It is an interesting concept and much needed one. Years ago, a similar concept ( virtual university) was floated by Guru Nityachaitanya Yati a psychologist from Kerala, but established an ashram at Fern Hill, Ootty, Tamil Nadu, India- and he is no more now. Would like to be part of such an initiative, especially when people are discriminated due to the 4 C's- 'color', class, caste and country. Regards Sam Manickam

   

Sarah Sayeed, New York City

Sarah Sayeed, Ph.D., is the Chair and Executive Director of the Civic Engagement Commission of New York City. She is a Bronx resident and has been dedicated to building an inclusive public square for almost two decades. She kindly wrote in her registration for this workshop on November 23, 2022: "The Commission identified dignity as one of its core values for how we approach engagement — alongside other values including listening; dynamic learning; collaboration; accessibility & justice; manifesting community power and imaginative ways of working."

Prior to this appointment, Dr. Sayeed was a Senior Advisor to former Mayor Bill de Blasio in the Mayor's Community Affairs Unit, where she worked with a diverse, multi-ethnic and multi-lingual Muslim constituency to strengthen civic engagement. Her public service builds upon seven years of bridge building projects at the Interfaith Center of New York, where she regularly convened New York's diverse grassroots religious leaders with secular and city agencies, and implemented an extended collaboration between Catholic and Muslim social service providers. Dr. Sayeed also taught Communications to graduates and undergraduates at Baruch's School of Public Affairs for five years. Through her years of volunteer work with diverse Muslim organizations, including Women in Islam, Inc., she has been an avid promoter of interfaith relations and Muslim women's public engagement. Sarah earned a B.A. in Sociology and Near East Studies from Princeton University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Communications from the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. She also holds a certificate in Reconciliation Leadership through the Institute for Global Leadership and is an alumna of the American Muslim Civic Leadership Institute (AMCLI) Fellows program.

   

Shahid Khan, Brooklyn — Little Pakistan

Dear Shahid, you are a dear member of our dignity community since many years, and we are deeply thankful for your initiative to organize one of our future conferences in Pakistan!

   

Sharon Steinborn, Las Cruces, New Mexico, U.S.A.

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Sharon explained, "Our belief/need to feel that we are separate, distinct, completely individualistic humans living on this planet leads to isolation and fear; an existential threat of aloneness and the resultant anxiety. That we are truly and deeply one and connected to each other physically, emotionally and spiritually is what leads to healing. What hurts one hurts the other. When I accept that truth it makes it more difficult to harm another. Dignity is a communal responsibility."

A very warm welcome to our workshop, dear Sharon!

   

Suni Muraleedharan, Perinthalmanna, Kerala, India

Suni kindly wrote in the registration that he is a clinical psychologist by Passion and Profession. "I am a Human being as well as a Clinical Psychologist by profession, understanding human as human."

   
 

Susanna Pearce, Ithaca, New York

Welcome to our workshop, dear Susanna!

   

Sushrut Jadhav, London, United Kingdom

Sushrut S. Jadhav, MBBS, MD, MRCPsych., PhD, Professor of Cultural Psychiatry, University College London, is also a Research Associate of the Department of Anthropology, SOAS, in London.

He kindly wrote:

I am a street psychiatrist and clinician anthropologist in London, UK. I work as Professor of Cultural Psychiatry, University College London, & Consultant Psychiatrist, Camden Homeless Outreach Services & Islington Mental Health Rehabilitation Services. I am also a Lead Clinician, Cultural Consultation Service, Camden and Islington Community Health and Social Care Trust. In addition, I am Founding Editor and Editor-in-Chief, Anthropology and Medicine journal (Taylor & Francis, UK). My current interests include mental health dimensions of marginal groups with a focus on Caste in India. I have taught extensively in medical anthropology and cultural psychiatry programmes, at several national and international Universities, and was an advisor to DSM 5 Task Force for Cultural Formulation. I have supervised UCL doctoral and post-doctoral scholars conducting research on the cultural appropriateness of mental health theory and practice in low-income nations with a specific focus on India. More recently, I am engaged in field testing cultural psychological therapy for social defeat amongst Dalits (former ‘untouchables’), identity distress among 'upper-ed' and 'forward-ed' Castes in India, mental health dimensions of human-animal relationship, and addressing digital oppression in Human-Artificial Intelligence relationship. My work is translational, deploying anthropological theory in the clinic, and bidirectional in applying insights from socially defeated peoples in India to the homeless-ed population the London.

 

Sonja Ewerdt-Schlaak, Saxony, Germany

Judge, Mediator, Lecturer, Coach and Supervisor for mediators and legal professionals.

At the interface between law and digitization, many new questions and challenges arise for lawyers.
Sonja contributes with her many years of experience as a district court judge, mediator and supervisor to develop good concepts for people in the judiciary who are confronted with these challenges.

   
 

Susan Adams, Oregon, U.S.A.

Susan is a retired teacher. Welcome, dear Susan!

   

Tony Gaskew, Pittsburgh, New York City

Thank you so much, dear Tony, for being our inspiration since our Annette Anderson-Engler brought you to us in 2008! You brought your important message to many of our December workshops in New York City! Thank you so much for your important contribution this year to Dignilogue 3 (Video)!

Dr. Tony Gaskew was awarded the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (DHS) Beacon of Dignity Award in 2015 for his outstanding dedication to equality and human rights.
Tony Gaskew is Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Professor of Criminal Justice, Affiliate Faculty in Africana Studies, and Director of the Prison Education Program at the University of Pittsburgh, Bradford. He is a Fulbright Hays Scholar, who has conducted ethnographic field work throughout Africa. His research and publications focus on revolutionary violence within the Black Radical Tradition. His book, Stop Trying to Fix Policing: Lessons Learned from the Front Lines of Black Liberation (Rowman & Littlefield, 2021), examines the Pan-Afrikan rituals for dismantling the institution of American policing. [read more]

Thank you so much for your important contribution to this book:
"Mindfulness, the Reawakening of Black Dharma, and Mastering the Art of Policing." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael Britton, and Linda Hartling. Chapter 9. (Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019)

   

Tracey-Leigh Wessels, Durban, Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa

Dear Tracey-Leigh, thank you for kindly sharing your thoughts on 7th November 2021: "The longer I work in my field, the greater the sense that recognition of an individual's inherent dignity starts in the family unit and then filters out... if we can get it right in the family, we are on the road to success for the next generation. My motto, it's one family, one child at a time."

   

Valerie Owolo, New York

Valerie Owolo has a Masters in Organizational Psychology from MD-ICCCR Teachers College, Columbia University.
Welcome to our workshop, dear Valerie!

   

Uli Spalthoff, Southern Germany

When asked "What does 'dignity through solidarity' mean to you?" Uli explained, "For me, these are almost synonyms, as solidarity always implied recognizing equal dignity of others."

Ulrich J. Spalthoff, Ph.D., is the Director of Operations of Dignity Press, HumanDHS Director of Project Development and System Administration, and also a Member of the HumanDHS Board of Directors.

Dear Uli, we cannot imagine our dignity work without you. You have offered your dignifying support as a free gift for more than ten years now! On behalf of humanity, please allow us to express our deepest gratitude!

Since you got to know our work in 2003 and joined us in 2010, you and your wife have traveled all the way to come to some of our conferences — for instance, the one in 2011 in New Zealand, and the one in 2015 in Rwanda — and with your immense knowledge and expertise you have built up the platform for the World Dignity University initiative.

Thank you so much for your great contribution to Dignilogue 4 on Day Two of our workshop, titled, My Experience with the WDU Platform (Video)!

   

Vinita Raj, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India

Welcome to our workshop, dear Vinita! Our entire global dignity community is grateful for the 2017 Dignity Conference in Indore that YOU helped convene!

   

Walid Sarhan, Amman, Jordan

Walid Sarhan, MD, FRCPsych, IDFAP, is a Senior Consultant psychiatrist working in Amman, Jordan. He is the Chief Editor of The Arab Journal of Psychiatry, a Member and Fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists (FRCPsych), an International Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association (IDFAPA), and an honorary member of the World Psychiatric Association. He is very active in continuous medical education and public awareness building. He has been honored as "the best Arab Psychiatrist in the world" in 2022.

   

 


 

Rationale, Methodology, and Frame

 

Rationale

This workshop series is part of a larger process. Each workshop is much more than a stand-alone event. It is part of the overall mission of our global dignity movement, which is to create an atmosphere in which people can meet on a plane of mutual friendship and equality in dignity. The workshop invites its participants to experiment with creating a new culture of global cohesion and togetherness, and to nurture a global family of dignity, a family that truly acts like a good family should act and protects and cherishes our unity in diversity. The workshop invites into enlarging and transcending concepts such private versus public, or family/friends/good neighbors versus "bad neighbors" (or even "enemies"), as well as concepts such as life mission versus job/hobby..

Given the current context of the field of international conflict, the impact of emotions on conflict has become one of the most important questions worldwide. However, there are only scattered publications in the research and applied literature that would address issues on conflict and emotion directly, as well as their relations and their impact on public policy.

The first one-day meeting was held at Teachers College, Columbia University, in 2002, convened by Morton Deutsch personally, the first two-day workshop in 2004, hosted by the Columbia University's Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN), since 2009, AC4 stepped into the place of CU-CRN), with special help from SIPA – Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR) and The Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR)

Since 2004, CICR on behalf of CU-CRN and later AC4, together with the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network and, since 2011, also the World Dignity University (WDU) initiative, invites selected groups of scholars, counselors, conflict resolution practitioners, mediators, and teachers among other professions for a two-day workshop every year to explore issues of conflict and emotions and its application to actual negotiations and diplomacy. The aim is to particularly probe the role of the notion of humiliation from the two different angles of conflict and emotion.

The workshops are envisaged as a learning community gathering, interactive and highly participatory. The purpose is to create an open space to identify and sharpen our understanding of the discourse and debate on emotion and conflict and the role that might, or might not be played by humiliation within this field. We hope to be able to continue this effort in follow-up workshops in the future.

We see humiliation as entry point into broader analysis and not as "single interest scholarship." We are aware that most participants focus on other aspects than humiliation in their work and have not thought about humiliation much, or even at all. We do not expect anybody to do so beforehand. We encourage that everybody comes with his/her background, his/her theoretical concepts and tools, and that we, during the conference, reflect together. We invite everybody to use their focus and give a thought to whether the notion of humiliation could be enriching, or not, and if yes, in what way. We warmly invite diverging and dissenting views.

How We Go About

In our conferences, we choose a dialogical methodology that stresses interaction and participation, because we wish to create an atmosphere of openness and respectful inquiry through "dignity dialogues" or dignilogues and, when appropriate, the use of Open Space Technology. We believe that notions such as dignity and respect for equal dignity are important not only for conflict resolution, but also for conferences such as our workshops. The name Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies attempts to express this. We wish to strive for consistency between what we think are important values for conflict resolution, and the way we conduct our work and our conferences.

We believe in "waging good conflict" (Jean Baker Miller). We believe that diverging opinions and perspectives need to be expressed and not avoided, because diversity enriches. However, diversity only enriches if embedded into mutual connection and appreciation. If not harnessed lovingly and caringly, diversity has the potential to divide, create hostility, and foster hatred and even violence. In the spirit of our vision, we, the HumanDHS network, wish therefore to avoid the latter and foster an atmosphere of common ground and mutually caring connections as a space for the safe expression of even the deepest differences and disagreements, and the toughest questions of humiliation, trauma, and injustice.

Every dignilogue is being opened by brief remarks by each participant to present their entry points into the inquiry. In order to facilitate feedback, we wish to make available a brief synopsis of 1 to 4 pages, preferably with references, from each participant, prior to the workshop through this site so that all participants can meet virtually before meeting in person. Longer papers are welcome as well both prior and subsequent to our workshops, not least for the envisaged publications of the results of our conferences. Please notify us, if you wish to submit any of your papers also as a book chapter or as a journal article in our Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.

All participants are warmly invited to send in their papers as soon as they can. We would be grateful if you could help us by formatting your contribution as follows:
1. Title: bold and in a large font.
2. The author's name under the title, proceeded by a copyright sign Creative Commona.
3. In case the text is longer than one page: A footer for the name of the author, and a header for the title and the page number (in Word, you can use View > Header and Footer > Page Setup > Different first page, etc.).
4. Spacing: Single-spacing.
5. For non-natural English speakers who need support to make a text readable, please let us know and we try to find help.
5. The final Word document needs to be transformed into a Pdf file (use, for example, convert.neevia.com), and given a name. Please use your family name, and then identify the conference, in case of the 2008 NY workshop, this would read as follows: "FamilynameNY08meeting."
6. Please send us both you Word and Pdf files. Thank you!

Peace Linguist Francisco Gomes de Matos commented on this format as follows (May 2, 2012): "It enhances RELATIONAL DIGNITY. Everyone will make the most of such dignifyingly used time! A great humanizing, interactive format: a little bit of MONOlogue, followed by much DIALOGUE, will help create DIGNILOGUE."

Frame

by Linda M. Hartling, Ph.D., Director of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (until 2008 Associate Director of the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute at Wellesley College in Boston, USA)

In our conferences we aim at creating a humiliation-free, collaborative learning environment characterized by mutual respect, mutual empathy, and openness to difference. The perspective of "appreciative enquiry" is a useful frame of our work. Our HumanDHS efforts are not just about the work we do together, but also about HOW WE WORK TOGETHER. At appropriate points during our conferences, for example at the end of each day, we take a moment to reflect on the practices observed that contributed to an appreciative/humiliation-free learning experience.

It is important to emphasize that an appreciative approach is not about expecting people to agree. In fact, differences of opinion enrich the conversation and deepen people's understanding of ideas. This could be conceptualized as "waging good conflict" (Jean Baker Miller), which means practicing radical respect for differences and being open to a variety of perspectives and engaging others without contempt or rankism. As we have seen in many fields, contempt and rankism drain energy away from the important work that needs to be done. Most people only know "conflict" as a form of war within a win/lose frame. "Waging good conflict," on the other side, is about being empathic and respectful, making room for authenticity, creating clarity, and growth.

Please see also the following background material, mainly created by Linda Hartling:
Dignilogue Tips and Dynamic Dignilogue List, created on October 10, 2015, for the 2015 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 3 – 4, 2015.
Dignilogue: An Introduction to Dignity + Dialogue, created on 31th May 2015 for the 2015 Kigali Conference
Greetings to All (short version), created on 16h April 2013 for the 2013 South Africa Conference
Greetings to All (long version), created on 16h April 2013 for the 2013 South Africa Conference
Welcome to Everybody, created on 12th August 2012 for the 2012 Norway Conference
Our Open Space Dignilogue Format, created on 12th August 2012 for the 2012 Norway Conference
• A Summary of Our Dignilogue Format for you to download
An Appreciative Frame: Beginning a Dialogue on Human Dignity and Humiliation, written by Linda Hartling in 2005
Appreciative Facilitation: Hints for Dignilogue Moderators, written by Judith Thompson in February 2006 to support the moderators of our workshops
Buddhist Teachings on Right Speech, kindly provided to us by Thomas Daffern in 2006, relating to our quest for appreciative enquiry, caring and being

• Please see also the videos on our Appreciative Frame, created by Linda Hartling:
- Appreciative Frame, recorded on August 23, 2022, in Portland, Oregon, USA, for our 37th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, in Amman, Jordan, 5th – 7th September 2022
- Appreciative Frame, recorded on December 9, 2021, for our 2021 New York Workshop
- Appreciative Frame, recorded on December 10, 2020, for our 2020 New York Workshop
- Appreciative Frame, recorded on December 5, 2019, for our 2019 New York Workshop
- Appreciative Frame, recorded on December 8, 2016, at the 2016 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 8 – 9, 2016
- Appreciative Enquiry 4, recorded on May 27, 2015, in Portland, Oregon, USA, for the 25th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, in Kigali, Rwanda, 2nd – 5th June 2015
- Our Appreciative Frame 3, a video created in December 2014 (see also Pdf), for the 2014 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 4 – 5, 2014
- Appreciative Enquiry 2, a video that was uploaded onto YouTube on August 11, 2012, in preparation of the 19th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 27th – 30th August 2012, in Oslo, Norway
- Appreciative Enquiry 1, a video that was recorded on October 30, 2011, in Portland, Oregon, USA, by Evelin Lindner, for the World Dignity University initiative

 



List of Conveners

Honorary Convener 2003 – 2017: Morton Deutsch (February 4, 1920 – March 13, 2017), E. L. Thorndike Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Education, and Director Emeritus of The Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR), Teachers College, Columbia University

Morton Deutsch has been one of the world's most respected scholars and the founder of The Morton Deutsch International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution (MD-ICCCR). MD-ICCCR was part of the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN), and since 2009 co-founded the Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict, and Complexity (AC4). Professor Deutsch has been widely honored for his scientific contributions involving research on cooperation and competition, social justice, group dynamics, and conflict resolution. He has published extensively and is well known for his pioneering studies in intergroup relations, social conformity, and the social psychology of justice. His books include: Interracial Housing (1951); Theories in Social Psychology (1965); The Resolution of Conflict (1973); Distributive Justice (1985); and The Handbook of Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice (2000, 2nd edition 2006). Please note, in particular, Morton Deutsch's pledge titled Imagine a Global Human Community and its progress.
Morton Deutsch has been a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board since the inception of our dignity work in 2001, and, in 2014, he accepted, "with delight," our invitation to be our HumanDHS Board of Directors Honorary Lifetime Member. Morton Deutsch has also been the first recipient of the HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award, which he received at the 2009 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict. Furthermore, Morton Deutsch has been a Founding Member of the World Dignity University initiative.
Morton Deutsch founded this workshop series in 2003 and has been its Honorary Convener until his passing in 2017. We will honor his memory by conducting this workshop also in the future. The first "Annual Round Table of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies" (as we called it then) was convened by Morton Deutsch at the MC-ICCCR on July 7, 2003, with Peter T. Coleman, Beth Fisher-Yoshida, Janet Gerson, Andrea Bartoli, Michelle Fine, and Susan Opotow and as participants.
We wish to give special thanks to Peter Coleman, Beth Fisher-Yoshida, and Janet Gerson for their ongoing substantive support for our dignity work since 2001. Andrea Bartoli inspired this workshop series and helped design it in 2003. He was at that time the Director of the Center for International Conflict Resolution (CICR) at the School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University, and Chairman of the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN). Andrea Bartoli is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board since its inception. Also his successor, Aldo Civico, kindly supported this workshop, as did his successor, Jean-Marie Guéhenno, who became the President of the International Crisis Group in 2014. We wish to give special thanks to all three for their kind support. Since 2015, CIRC is dormant and the Arnold A. Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies (SIWPS) at the School of International and Public Affairs offers courses in specialization in conflict resolution (ICR Concentration).

Linda M. Hartling, Ph.D., Social Psychologist, organizer of the HumanDHS conferences, in support of the local conveners

Linda M. Hartling, Ph.D., is the recipient of the 2015 Human Dignity (Half!) Lifetime Commitment Award.
She is the Director of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) and contributes to the leadership and development of workshops, conferences, Dignity Press publications, and the World Dignity University initiative. She works in daily collaboration with HumanDHS Founding President Evelin Lindner and is the orchestrator and key creator of the Dignity Letter. She is also a member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board, HumanDHS Global Core Team, HumanDHS Global Coordinating Team, HumanDHS Research Team, and HumanDHS Education Team.
Linda Hartling's husband Richard Slaven, formerly Brandeis University, Massachusetts, U.S.A., is the Director of HumanDHS Dignifunding. Richard Slaven is a Member of the Board of Directors of HumanDHS, he is a mamber of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board and a Member of the HumanDHS Planning Committee. He is the recipient of the 2014 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award.
Prior to the founding of HumanDHS, Linda Hartling was the Associate Director the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) at the Stone Center, which was part of the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College in Massachusetts. She worked closely with Jean Baker Miller, MD, and other colleagues on the development of Relational-Cultural Theory. She holds a doctoral degree in clinical/community psychology and she developed the first scale to assess the internal experience of humiliation in 1996, which has been translated into many languages. In addition, she has published papers and chapters on resilience, substance abuse prevention, shame and humiliation, relational practice in the workplace, and Relational-Cultural Theory. [read more]
Linda Hartling kindly co-edited this book, wrote the Foreword and the final chapter:
"Moving Beyond Humiliation: A Relational Conceptualization of Human Rights." In Human Dignity: Practices, Discourses, and Transformations: Essays on Dignity Studies in Honor of Evelin G. Lindner. Edited by Chipamong Chowdhury, Michael Britton, and Linda Hartling. Chapter 15. Lake Oswego, OR: Dignity Press, 2019
Please see also:
• Humiliation: Real Pain, A Pathway to Violence, the draft of Linda's paper for Round Table 2 of our 2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University, New York City
Humiliation: Assessing the Impact of Derision, Degradation, and Debasement, first published in The Journal of Primary Prevention, 19(4): 259-278, co-authored with T. Luchetta, 1999
• Shame and Humiliation: From Isolation to Relational Transformation, the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMIT), Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College No. 88, Wellesley, MA 02481, co-authored with Wendy Rosen, Maureen Walker, Judith V. Jordan, 2000.
• Humiliation and Assistance: Telling the Truth About Power, Telling a New Story, paper prepared for the 5th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies 'Beyond Humiliation: Encouraging Human Dignity in the Lives and Work of All People', in Berlin, 15th -17th September, 2005
•  Dignilogue Tips and Dynamic Dignilogue List, created on October 10, 2015, for the 2015 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, in New York City, December 3 – 4, 2015
Mini-Documentary of the Annual Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict "The Globalization of Dignity," December 8 - 9, 2016
See also Linda Hartling's introductions to the Appreciative Frame that we use in our work.
[read more]

Evelin Gerda Lindner, Medical Doctor, Clinical and Social Psychologist, Ph.D. (Dr. med.), Ph.D. (Dr. psychol.), organizer of the HumanDHS conferences, in supporting of the local conveners

Evelin Gerda Lindner is the Founding President of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network and initiator of the World Dignity University initiative. She is a transdisciplinary social scientist and humanist who holds two Ph.D.s, one in medicine and one in psychology. In 1996, she designed a research project on the concept of humiliation and its role in genocide and war. German history served as starting point. She is the recipient of the 2006 SBAP Award, the 2009 "Prisoner’s Testament" Peace Award, the 2014 HumanDHS Lifetime Commitment Award, and she has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2015, 2016, and 2017. She is affiliated with the Columbia University Conflict Resolution Network (CU-CRN), which was superseded, in 2009, by the Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict, and Complexity (AC4), at Columbia University, New York City. She is also affiliated with the University of Oslo, Norway, with its Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, and with its Department of Psychology (folk.uio.no/evelinl/), and, furthermore, with the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme in Paris. Lindner is teaching globally, including in South East Asia, the Middle East, Australia, Africa, and other places globally. [read more]
Please see:
Interview with Evelin Lindner - Challenges of our Time; Learning to Connect, December 8, 2016
Mini-Documentary of the Annual Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict "The Globalization of Dignity," December 8 - 9, 2016

 


 

Participants in all NY workshops since 2003

 


 

Papers

All participants are warmly invited to send in full papers after the workshop.
Please notify us, if you wish to submit any of your papers also as a book chapter or as a journal article in our Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies.

Please see earlier submitted papers here:
•  List of all Publications
•  2004 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2005 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2006 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2007 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2008 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2009 Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2010 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2011 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2012 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2013 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2014 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2015 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2016 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2017 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2018 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2019 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2020 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2021 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict
•  2022 Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict

 

Abstracts/Notes/Papers of 2022

Please see further down the papers/notes that participants send in prior to the workshop so that everybody can get acquainted with all others beforehand.

See here the work by:
Andrea Bartoli
Linda M. Hartling
Donald C. Klein

Victoria C. Fontan

Evelin G. Lindner


 

Material