Video-taped Dialogues on Dignity or Dignilogues
#dignism


 

We often use #dignism when we upload videos on YouTube (see also Evelin Lindner's channel, and Gaby Saab's WDUi channel).

Evelin Lindner's Contributions to the World Dignity University (WDU) Initiative, 1998 til present

• Introductory Lectures: Dignity or Humiliation (2 hours)

Video-taped introductory lectures on Dignity or Humiliation (2 hours)
These lectures were open to everybody and hosted since 2002 by the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, until 2014 as part of PSYC3203 – Anvendt sosialpsykologi, in 2015 as guest lecture in Kultur- og sammfunnspsykologi / Cultural and Community Psychology, and from 2016 as part of PSY4506 – Human Rights, Democracy and Reconstruction after Conflict; A community based approach, by Nora Sveaass and Inger Skjelsbæk. See the video site of the Faculty of Social Science and search for "Lindner." Thank you, dear Lasse Moer, for your untiring support!

– 27th February 2020: On Dignity and Humiliation: The Case of the Amazon Rainforest (UiO Podcast edition | YouTube edition)
22nd March 2019: On Dignity and Humiliation (UiO Podcast edition | YouTube edition)
2nd March 2018: On Dignity and Humiliation (UiO Podcast edition | YouTube edition)
2nd March 2017: Post-Conflict Reconstruction and Reconciliation: The Case of Rwanda (YouTube edition | YouTube clip by Esben Østbye)
3rd March 2016: From Humiliation, Vengeance, and Genocide to Reconciliation: Experiences from Rwanda (UiO Podcast edition | YouTube edition)
11th February 2015: Hva har kultur- og samfunnspsykologi med verdighet å gjøre? (UiO Podcast av foredraget og samtalen på slutten | YouTube utgave av samtalen)
22nd January 2014: Verdighet eller ydmykelse? (UiO Podcast utgave | YouTube utgaven av samtalen på slutten)
23rd January 2013: Dignity and Humiliation: Norway and the Concept of likeverd (UiO Podcast edition | YouTube edition | A summary in Norwegian by Tone B. Bergflødt, Om vår kulturelle arv og om ydmykelse: The nuclear bomb of emotions)
25th January 2012: Humiliation and Terrorism (UiO Podcast edition | YouTube editions Part 1 | Part 2 dialogue)
12th January 2011: Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad (UiO Podcast edition | YouTube editions part 1 | part 2)
– 13th January 2010: Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad
14th January 2009: Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad (UiO Podcast edition | YouTube editions part 1, part 2 | part 3 | part 4)
– 30th September 2008: Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad
– 2004, 2005, 2006: Ydmykelse og konflikt: Forelesning i Anvendt psykologi for fjerde semester Sosialpsykologi, Profesjonsstudiet, ved Reidar Ommundsen, Universitetet i Oslo, Psykologisk institutt / Lecture in Applied Psychology for 4th Semester Social Psychology, University of Oslo, Department of Psychology.
- 14th October 2003: Humiliation and Conflict

Please see background material for these lectures full texts of books, chapters, and articles here. See, for example, the first issue of the Journal of HumanDignity and Humiliation Studies, March 2007. For an earlier version for the introductory paper, see here or http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742).
For more recent papers see, among others, The Need for a New World, What the World’s Cultures Can Contribute to Creating a Sustainable Future for Humankind, or Terror in Norway.

• Initial Doctoral Research: Somalia - A Case-Study: Humiliation and Coping in War
The film Somalia - A Case-Study: Humiliation and Coping in War (see also a MP4 version on YouTube, earlier title: Humiliation, Genocide, Dictatorship, and the International Community: Somalia As a Case Study) is a compilation of short videos from Somaliland, cut from altogether ca. 10 hours of video material and 100 hours of audio material that Evelin Lindner collected in Somaliland in 1998 (the film was produced in 2000), in Kenya, and Rwanda/Burundi in 1999 for her doctoral thesis The Psychology of Humiliation: Somalia, Rwanda / Burundi, and Hitler's Germany (Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, submitted 31st October 2000, ISBN 82-569-1817-9).
I would like to thank Lasse Moer, member of the HumanDSH Global Advisory Board, for his work in helping create this film.
This film aims at giving an impression of Evelin Lindner's field work in Somaliland with a selection of local views and descriptions of occurrences of humiliation and resilience to humiliation. For resilience to humiliation, see particularly the stories of the SORRA group, whose members spent almost a decade in solitary confinement as punishment for wanting to help the hospital in Hargeisa (sharing the fate of many intellectuals around the world who are the first victims of dicators), and the experience of former first lady Edna Adan, who is now a Member of the Global Advisory Board of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network that grew out of Lindner's doctoral research. Also Hassan Keynan is a Member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board.
See here a transcription of parts of the interview with Edna Adan on 3rd December 1998:
- I think humiliation is a very difficult thing to describe. But I think humiliation is when someone tries to bring someone down to their level. They think that you are above them and they want to hurt you, humiliate you, bring you down to their level, so that you have no more self-respect, so that you lose the respect you have for yourself and others lose the respect they have for you. Once they said I was planning to escape from the country, and I spent six days in jail for that. For the first, why didn't they wait until I tried to escape, why arrest me from my house! They put me in a cell of my own, but I didn't have a toilet. And right in front of the place where they put me, there was a toilet, and it had no doors. And there was the cell next to me, it was full of men, of criminals, of thieves, I don't know, just men, men all behind the bars. And, so I called out, and I said, - you know, - 'I, - I, - I need to go and use the bathroom!' And that is after I had been the first lady of the country! And they said: 'Well, you want to use the bathroom? There is the bathroom! You use everybody's bathroom! There! You are not better than the others! There is the bathroom they use!' And I thought - how can I use the bathroom with no doors facing a cell full of men! Full of criminals and people who, - you know, - and I just came out of my cell and I just looked at those men, and I said: 'Listen. I am going to use this bathroom. And, would you be watching your mother or your sister if she was using a toilet and she had no door, - is this the kind of men you are that you would watch a woman using a bathroom?' And they said, 'No.' And the first one said 'turn around,' and they made everyone turn the other way, until I finished using the bathroom. And that was one of the most emotional moments of my time. And the police was so shocked, because they couldn't get their objective, they couldn't get me to be humiliated and using a bathroom with all these men watching and shouting at me. So, this is another form of resistance, and resisting humiliation!
- Does humiliation lead to war? I would answer that question by saying, 'Yes, it does!' You can push human beings too far, just far enough until they turn back and say 'Hei, wait a minute, enough is enough.' And then they begin to resist with violence, with strength, with force, with whatever way they know. And, I think a good example of resisting humiliation through war is what has happened to our country, the people of Somaliland.
- The former first lady of Somalia, Edna Adan, also said: ‘I hope you have strong cupboards to put your conscience into! Where are all the weapons produced which kill innocent people?’

• 00 Welcome Video
This welcome video was created by Lasse Moer on 18th October 2007, on the Blindern campus of the University of Oslo in sunny but very cold autumn weather. The blue jacket is part of the World Clothes for Equal Dignity project.
The text for this video has been written by Brian Ward.
Here is the full text:
"Hello! My name is Evelin Lindner and I have committed my life to engaging with people and communities around the world to end the cycles of violence resulting from people humiliating or putting other people down. To protect our planet for future generations we all need to hold hands in equal dignity and lead each other towards a peaceful, sustainable and a richly diverse global community. Your knowledge, experiences, creativity and inspiration is needed wherever it might be as without your help the journey to peace and sustainability will take so much longer. If you are able to join our network of friends on this wonderful journey please have a look at the opportunities in this website and let us know! Thank you very much!"

• 00 The World Dignity University (WDU): How It Works, see Pdf files in English, Norsk, Deutsch, see also a Flyer in English)
The following videos introduce the WDU initiative:

- Evelin Lindner's Invitation to Join the World Dignity University Initiative
Evelin Lindner is being interviewed by Ragnhild Nilsen about her vision of the World Dignity University. This dialogue took place at the University in Oslo in Norway on 8th February 2011. Lasse Moer, Chief Engineer for Audiovisual Technology at the Faculty of Social Sciences of the University in Oslo, was the technical director of this video-take. See it also on Lasse's Youtube channel and on lasse-videos.blip.tv/file/4782737/. Ragnhild Nilsen uses the artist name Arctic Queen. See also a WDU introduction in pdf format and a flyer. See a copy of this video on a site in China.

- World Dignity University Initiative: Introduction by Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner

This video was recorded in Portland, Oregon, U.S.A., on October 28, 2011. It is a dialogue between Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner. Annette Engler recorded the conversation. See also a WDU introduction in pdf format and a flyer. See a copy of this video on a site in China.

- World Dignity University Initiative: Introduction by Evelin Lindner

This video was created by Evelin Frerk in Berlin, Germany, on 5th April 2011, for the launch of the World Dignity University (WDU) initiative in June 2011. Evelin Lindner explains how the World Dignity University iniative is envisioned to unfold. See also a WDU introduction in pdf format and a flyer.

- Norwegian/Norsk: Verdensuniversitet for verdighet og likeverd: En kort innføring av Evelin Lindner
Denne videoen ble tatt opp av Evelin Lindner i New York City den 3. november 2011. Se også teksten i pdf format.
Se også Inga Bostad, prorektor av Universitetet i Oslo, og hennes kall for dialog som hun lagde i august 2011 til vår 17 årlige verdighetskonferanse i New Zealand. Hun bekreftet hvor viktig det er å arbeide for en global verdighetskultur og at å utvikle Verdensuniversitetet for verdighet og likeverd må være vår høyeste prioritet. Lasse Moer lagde videoen med Inga Bostad i Oslo. See a copy of this video on a site in China.

- Norwegian/Norsk: Norge etter den 22. juli 2011: Betydningen av et Verdensuniversitet for verdighet og likeverd, av Evelin Lindner
Denne videoen ble tatt opp av Evelin Lindner i New York City den 3. november 2011. Se også teksten i pdf format.
Se også Inga Bostad, prorektor av Universitetet i Oslo, og hennes kall for dialog som hun lagde i august 2011 til vår 17 årlige verdighetskonferanse i New Zealand. Hun bekreftet hvor viktig det er å arbeide for en global verdighetskultur og at å utvikle Verdensuniversitetet for verdighet og likeverd må være vår høyeste prioritet. Lasse Moer lagde videoen med Inga Bostad i Oslo. (Nøkkelord: Anders Behring Breivik, Utøya)

- German/Deutsch: Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies & World Dignity University: Eine kurze Einführung von Evelin Lindner
Dieses Video wurde aufgenommen von Evelin Frerk in Berlin am 5. April 2011, mit Blick auf die Lanzierung der Weltuniversität für Menschenwürde Initiative im Juni 2011. Es ist eine kurze Einführung in die Arbeit des Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) Netzwerkes und ihrer Weltuniversität für Menschenwürde/World Dignity University (WDU) Initiative. Siehe auch einen einführenden Text in Pdf Format.

- German/Deutsch: Weltuniversität für Menschenwürde Initiative: Eine kurze Einführung von Evelin Lindner

Dieses Video wurde aufgenommen von Evelin Frerk in Berlin am 5. April 2011, mit Blick auf die Lanzierung der Weltuniversität für Menschenwürde/World Dignity University (WDU) Initiative im Juni 2011. Es ist eine kurze Einführung. Siehe auch einen einführenden Text in Pdf Format.

- French/Francais: Initiative de l'Université Dignité Mondiale: Une Introduction par Evelin Lindner
Ce vidéo a été créée par Evelin Lindner, à New York City, le 4 Novembre 2011, pour l'Université Dignité Mondiale initiative. Evelin Lindner explique comment le Université Dignité Mondiale initiative est envisagé de se dérouler. Voir aussi une introduction en format pdf.


The following videos summarize Evelin Lindner's contributions as a WDU educator:

• 00 Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad (UiO Podcast edition | YouTube edition part 1, part 2 | part 3 | part 4)
Lecture at the Department of Psychology/Psykologisk institutt at the University of Oslo (Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, Auditorium 1, as part of PSYC3203 – Anvendt sosialpsykologi), given on 14th January, 2009. Audience: full auditorium with 56 persons.
Please see a background paper for this lecture in the first issue of the Journal of HumanDignity and Humiliation Studies, March 2007. For an earlier version for the introductory paper, see here or http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742).
For more recent papers see, among others, "The Need for a New World," and, since this lecture was given in Norway, "What the World’s Cultures Can Contribute to Creating a Sustainable Future for Humankind," a paper prepared for the 11th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS), 23th June-1st July 2008, in Norway. The latter paper hightlights the significance of Norway and Norwegian contributions to world peace.
See pictures.

• 00.1 Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad
Lecture at the Department of Psychology/Psykologisk institutt at the University of Oslo, Norway (Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, as part of PSYC3203 – Anvendt sosialpsykologi), 13th January 2010, 10.15-12.00. See pictures.
Please see a background paper for this lecture in the first issue of the Journal of HumanDignity and Humiliation Studies, March 2007. For an earlier version for the introductory paper, see here or http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742).
For more recent papers see, among others, "The Need for a New World," and, since this lecture was given in Norway, "What the World’s Cultures Can Contribute to Creating a Sustainable Future for Humankind," a paper prepared for the 11th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS), 23th June-1st July 2008, in Norway. The latter paper hightlights the significance of Norway and Norwegian contributions to world peace.
See pictures.

• 00.2 Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad (UiO Podcast edition | YouTube editions part 1 | part 2)
Lecture at the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo (Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, Auditorium 1, as part of PSYC3203 - Anvendt sosialpsykologi), given on 12th January 2011 (10.00-12.00), and 14th January, 2009 (9.15-11.00). Lecturer: Evelin Lindner. See the video site of the Faculty of Social Science at the University of Oslo.
Please see a background paper for this lecture in the first issue of the Journal of HumanDignity and Humiliation Studies, March 2007. For an earlier version for the introductory paper, see here or http://ssrn.com/abstract=668742 (this paper's SSRN ID is 668742).
For more recent papers see, among others, "The Need for a New World," and "What the World’s Cultures Can Contribute to Creating a Sustainable Future for Humankind." See pictures and video. See a copy of this video on a site in China.

• 01 Introduction: Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad
This video was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
It invites into Evelin Lindner's introductory lecture "Dignity or Humiliation: The World at a Crossroad." Please see two full lectures (two hours each) from 2009 and 2011. In these introductory lecture Evelin Lindner highlights the fact that dignity and humiliation have become more important topics for inquiry than ever before. She agrees with philosopher Avishai Margalit that the point is not justice but decency.
See also: "In Times of Globalization and Human Rights: Does Humiliation Become the Most Disruptive Force?" in the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, Volume 1, Number 1, March 2007.
• Abstract: This article is about humiliation, globalization, human rights, and dignity. The central question is the following: Could it be the case in a globalizing world in which people are increasingly exposed to human rights advocacy, that acts of humiliation and feelings of humiliation emerge as the most significant phenomena to resolve? This paper suggests that this is the case. It claims that all humans share a common ground, namely a yearning for recognition and respect that connects them and draws them into relationships. The paper argues that many of the observable rifts among people may stem from the humiliation that is felt when recognition and respect are lacking. The article proposes that only if the human desire for respect is cherished, respected, and nurtured, and if people are attributed equal dignity in this process, can differences turn into valuable diversities and sources of enrichment — both globally and locally — instead of sources of disruption.

• 02 Making Enemies: Humiliation and International Conflict
This video was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
In her first book on dignity and humiliation, Making Enemies: Humiliation and International Conflict (2006), Evelin Lindner describes how we can envision a more dignified world. The Foreword was written by Morton Deutsch. It is the first book on dignity and humiliation and how we may envisage a more dignified world, and it has been characterized as a path-breaking book and been honored as "Outstanding Academic Title" by the journal Choice for 2007 in the USA. This book discusses dignity and humiliation and how we may envisage a more dignified world. It first lays out a theory of the mental and social dynamics humiliation and proposes the need for "egalization" (the undoing of humiliation) for a healthy global society. It then presents chapters on the role of misunderstandings in fostering feelings of humiliation; the role of humiliation in international conflict; and the relationship of humiliation to terrorism and torture. It concludes with a discussion of how to defuse feelings of humiliation and create a dignified world.
In her second book, Emotion and Conflict: How Human Rights Can Dignify Emotion and Help Us Wage Good Conflict (2009), Lindner describes how realizing the promise of equality in dignity can help improve the human condition at all levels—from micro to meso to macro levels. This book uses a broad historical perspective that captures all of human history, from its hunter-gatherer origins to the promise of a globally united knowledge society in the future. It emphasizes the need to recognize and leave behind malign cultural, social, and psychological effects of the past. The book calls upon the world community, academics and lay people alike, to own up to the opportunities offered by increasing global interdependence.

• 03 Gender, Humiliation, and Global Security
This video was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
Gender, Humiliation, and Global Security: Dignifying Relationships from Love, Sex, and Parenthood to World Affairs (2010) is Evelin Lindner's third book. Archbishop Desmond Tutu contributed with a Foreword. The book rounds off with an Afterword by Linda Hartling in honor of Jean Baker Miller and Don Klein. The book examines the social and political ramifications of human violations and world crises related to humiliation. It charts how humiliation is conditioned into individuals by large-scale, and systemic social forces. It offers ideas for counteracting the powerful psychological effects of humiliation in order to encourage constructive social, political, and cultural change. The book is being "highly recommended" by Choice (in July 2010).
In her second book, Emotion and Conflict: How Human Rights Can Dignify Emotion and Help Us Wage Good Conflict (2009), Lindner described how realizing the promise of equality in dignity can help improve the human condition at all levels—from micro to meso to macro levels. This book uses a broad historical perspective that captures all of human history, from its hunter-gatherer origins to the promise of a globally united knowledge society in the future. It emphasizes the need to recognize and leave behind malign cultural, social, and psychological effects of the past. The book calls upon the world community, academics and lay people alike, to own up to the opportunities offered by increasing global interdependence.

• 04 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Intercultural Communication and Global Interhuman Communication
"The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Intercultural Communication and Global Interhuman Communication" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
See, among others, the article "Avoiding Humiliation - From Intercultural Communication to Global Interhuman Communication," in the Journal of Intercultural Communication, SIETAR Japan, Number 10, June 2007, pp. 21-38. See a draft for this lecture, which was revised and published in the Journal of Intercultural Communication, SIETAR Japan in June 2007.
• Abstract: Intercultural communication has the potential to fertilize transformative learning due to its power to unsettle us. This article suggests that we may go beyond being unsettled ourselves and let the very field of intercultural communication be unsettled. This article puts forward the proposal to inscribe intercultural communication into global interhuman communication. We suggest founding a new field, the field of “Global Interhuman Communication.”...
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.
See a copy of this video on a site in China.

• 05 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Trauma Therapy
"The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Trauma Therapy" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
See, among others, the article "Humiliation - Trauma that Has Been Overlooked: An Analysis Based on Fieldwork in Germany, Rwanda / Burundi, and Somalia," in TRAUMATOLOGYe, 7 (1), 2001, Article 3 (32 pages), tmt.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/7/1/43, or www.fsu.edu/%7Etrauma/v7/Humiliation.pdf.
• Abstract: What differentiates trauma from humiliation? This is one of the questions this article tries to answer. Trauma may occur without humiliation, as in the case of natural disaster, however, humiliation may be the core agent of trauma. Furthermore, this paper suggests that the role and significance of humiliation for traumatic experiences has long been overlooked by researchers and practitioners. The paper highlights the macro-historical backdrop for this neglect. It is the unfolding of human rights as opposed to more traditional honour codes at all levels of society both national and international. This change is a major force in making the category of trauma increasingly important, and in moving such practices as 'breaking the will of the child,' that were once legitimate and even prescribed, into the category of trauma. The paper also addresses the fact that social science is part of this transition and would benefit from making more visible how it is deeply interlinked with this process.
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.

• 06 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Terrorism
"The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Terrorism" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
We are still all shocked and profoundly saddened that Norway, where we had the most wonderful and peaceful launch of our World Dignity University initiative (on 24th June 2011), has been struck by such violence.
The rose-processions in July in Norway gave courage. They highlighted that the future lies in the mobilization of responsible citizens who stand together in solidarity. Today, there is no place on this earth that is not affected by what happens in the rest of the world, be it that people are opening up or closing themselves off to this larger world.
Inga Bostad, Vice-Rector of the University of Oslo, greeted the conference participants of the 17th Annual Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Conference in Dunedin, New Zealand. Lasse Moer video-taped Inga Bostad's personal message to the conference participants on 26th August 2011. In the light of the terrible 22/7 terror attacks in Oslo and Utøya, Inga Bostad encourages and urges everybody to engage in dialogue. She urged the conference participants to work on the World Dignity University Initiative during the conference.
Her words confirm that we must work locally and globally: Dignity must be a movement, a culture, a spirit, both locally and globally.
And this is precisely what we work for in our Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network and with our World Dignity University initiative.
Joining hands, nurturing a culture of mutual care, working for dignity, locally and globally, is what we need to invest all our energy in. Even though it cannot undo any harm that has happened in the past, it will, hopefully, help contribute to preventing more harm being perpetrated in the future. Never has work for dignity been more important.
In our work, we see it as our responsibility to create and disseminate narratives that respect the grievances that stand behind such violent narratives, yet, lead them into the direction of the dignity of a Mandela, rather than the direction of terror, genocide, and war.
We believe that the terrible tragedy that happened in Oslo and on Utøya is not just a Norwegian "problem" but a call that we, as humankind, have to show much more civic responsibility. The dignity of "unity in diversity" is the path to go, rather than "uniformity in division," or one camp trying to achieve "strength" through inner uniformity, in hostile division to the "enemy" camp that responds in kind (Christian versus Muslim, for example). Global interdependence, and the need for global cooperation in the face of global challenges, requires that we understand that narratives of hostile division bring demise to all of us, from whatever background such narratives may originate.
This was the message from the HumanDHS network after 22nd July 2011: "We are with you in Norway now, all of us, from all around the world, with our hearts and our tears, and, let us all understand that here we face a global responsibility, for all of humankind!"
See Terror in Norway: How Can We Continue from a Point of Utter despair? Promoting a Dignity Culture, not Just Locally, but Globally, a paper prepared for the 17th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies “Enlarging the Boundaries of Compassion” in Dunedin, New Zealand, 29th August - 1st September 2011.
Introduction: On 22nd July 2011, Norway suffered two sequential terrorist attacks against its civilian population, the government, and a political summer camp in Norway. This tragedy has shocked Norway to the point that even mentioning the name of the 32-year-old perpetrator Anders Behring Breivik was being avoided for a while and ABB was being used to refer to him. He was first regarded as right-wing terrorist and later, in an initial evaluation, diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia. A second evaluation began on 13th January 2012. The guiding questions of this paper are the following: What should be done after such atrocities have occurred? How can one continue from a point of utter despair? What can a society do to help its members? What can a society do to help prevent repetitions of similar acts of violence in the future?
See also a chapter written by Evelin Lindner earlier (among others), "The Relevance of Humiliation Studies for the Prevention of Terrorism," in Pick, Thomas M., Speckhard, Anne, and Beatrice Jacuch (Eds.), Home-Grown Terrorism: Understanding and Addressing the Root Causes of Radicalisation among Groups with an Immigrant Heritage in Europe, Section 3.1: The Societal Subsoil Nurturing Intolerant Militancy and Terrorism, as Against Measures and Processes Nurturing Tolerance, Section 3.1, pp. 163-188, Amsterdam, The Netherlands: IOS Press, supported by the NATO Science for Peace and Security Programme, E: Human and Societal Dynamics, Vol. 60, 2009. These are Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop Indigenous Terrorism: Understanding and Addressing the Root Causes of Radicalisation Among Groups with an Immigrant Heritage in Europe, Budapest, Hungary, 7-9th March, 2008. Please see a long first draft of this paper, and see also some pictures of the event at www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.
• Abstract: Why do young people who grew up in Europe kill innocent citizens in suicide attacks? In her paper, the author makes a link between the deep structure of terrorism and genocide, and offers humiliation as an explanation for both—feelings of humiliation, which carry the potential to lead to acts of humiliation and cycles of humiliation. Current historic times are characterised by two historically novel trends, first, rapidly increasing global interdependence, and second, a growing impact of the human rights message. Furthermore, new research indicates that one can feel as humiliated on behalf of victims one identifies with, as if one were to suffer this pain oneself, a phenomenon that is magnified when media give access to the suffering of people in far-flung places. Human rights ideals also compound this effect because humiliation represents the core violation of the human rights ideal of equality in dignity for all human beings. In the context of globalisation and human rights, therefore, humiliating people no longer produces humble underlings but risks fostering angry 'terrorists,' who have yet to realise that equal rights and dignity for all can only be attained by non-humiliating means. The Nelson-Mandela path out of humiliation, namely his strategy of embarking on proactive constructive social change instead of re-active cycles of humiliation, requires the nurturing, locally and globally, of a social and societal climate of mature differentiation, embedded into respect for the equality in dignity of all.
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.
See a copy of this video on a site in China.

See also Norway and the World after the 22nd of July 2011: The Significance of the World Dignity University Initiative (in Norwegian)
Norge og verden etter den 22. juli 2011: Betydningen av et Verdensuniversitet for verdighet og likeverd, av Evelin Lindner
Denne videoen ble tatt opp av Evelin Lindner i New York City den 3. november 2011. Se også teksten i pdf format.
Se også Inga Bostad, prorektor av Universitetet i Oslo, og hennes personlige videohilsen som hun sendte til oss i august 2011, når vi hadde vår 17 årlige konferanse. Hun bekreftet hvor umåtelig viktig det er å arbeide for en global verdighetskultur og at å utvikle Verdensuniversitetet for verdighet og likeverd må være vår høyeste prioritet. Lasse Moer lagde videoen med Inga Bostad i Oslo. (Nøkkelord: Anders Behring Breivik, Utøya)

• 07 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Genocide
"The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Genocide" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
See, among others, article titled "Genocide, Humiliation, and Inferiority: An Interdisciplinary Perspective," in Robins, Nicholas and Adam Jones (Eds.), Genocides by the Oppressed: Subaltern Genocide in Theory and Practice, Bloomington, chapter 7, pp. 138-158. IN: Indiana University Press, 2009.
Abstract: Genocide has many perplexing characteristics. For example, is it solely and fundamentally about killing? If so, why are so many genocide victims not “merely” killed, but elaborately humiliated beforehand? Furthermore, are the victims of genocide not members of rather powerless minorities whose significance is blown up artificially? If so, why are resources mobilized to humiliate and kill people who are already powerless? Why, in short, are the powerless perceived as a threat? This chapter draws on the author’s work on humiliation studies, and other analyses of humiliation in the genocide-studies literature. It suggests that neither ethnic fault lines, nor dwindling resources or other “rational” conflicts of interest, nor simple scapegoating, nor any general “evilness” of human nature may lie at the heart of genocide. Rather, complex psychological mindsets and behavioral clusters operate according to their own “rationality.” These may entail acts of humiliation as a response to fear of humiliation – or, more precisely, to an imagined fear of future humiliations, based on past ones. Accordingly, genocide’s perpetrators may be drawn not only from elites, but also from a recently risen underclass exhibiting a complex web of features, sometimes labeled as an “inferiority complex.” These dynamics are relevant not only for genocide, but also for global terrorism and thus represent an important field of inquiry not only locally but also for global human security.
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.

• 08 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for War
"The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for War" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
Evelin Lindner's reflections derive from close to forty years of international experience, first as a clinical psychologist, then coupled with social psychological research on humiliation. Her four-year doctoral research project in social psychology was titled The Feeling of Being Humiliated: A Central Theme in Armed Conflicts. A Study of the Role of Humiliation in Somalia, and Rwanda/Burundi, Between the Warring Parties, and in Relation to Third Intervening Parties (2000, University of Oslo). See also the chapter titled "Emotion and Conflict: Why It Is Important to Understand How Emotions Affect Conflict and How Conflict Affects Emotions," in Deutsch, Morton, Coleman, Peter T. and Eric C. Marcus (Eds.), The Handbook of Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice. (2nd ed.), Chapter Twelve, pp. 268-293, San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2006.
Introduction to Evelin Lindner's chapter: We have all experienced strong emotions related to conflict. Our emotions affect the conflicts in our lives and conflict, in turn, influences our emotions. This chapter begins with two brief examples, one international and one personal, to show the interaction between emotions and conflict. For the international example, let us look at World War II. Hitler was an isolated and alienated loner obsessed by the weakness of Germany during World War I and after. At some point, however, his obsessions began to resonate with the feelings of what was called in Germany "the little people" (die kleinen Leute, or the powerless). He offered a grand narrative of national humiliation and invited "the little people" to join in with the personal grievances they suffered due to the general political and economic misery. "The little people" occupied a distinctly subordinated position in Germany 's social hierarchy prior to Hitler's rise. They rallied to Hitler's cause because he provided them with a sense of importance. He was greeted as a savior, as a new kind of leader promising them love and unprecedented significance instead of insignificance. Only after World War II did they have to painfully recognize how he had abused their loyalty. As soon as he had enough popular support, Hitler built institutions that forced his manipulation on everybody, evoking noble feelings of loyalty and heroic resistance against humiliation, convincing the German people that the Aryan race was meant to lead and save the world. Hitler was an expert on feelings. Many Germans put such faith in Hitler that they followed him until 1945, even when it became clear that the situation was doomed. Intense loyalty and highly emotional participation in a collective obsession undercut even the most basic rational and ethical considerations. See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.
See a copy of this video on a site in China.

• 09 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for World Economy
"The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for World Economy" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
A Dignity Economy is Evelin Lindner's fourth book (2012). Please read here a quote from this book: "Linda Hartling and I, since we are not economists, hesitate to analyze economic topics. On the other hand, we cannot avoid witnessing the humiliating effects of existing economic practices and institutions. Furthermore, since economic structures represent the largest frames within which human activities are played out, they are of utmost importance and cannot be overlooked. If the largest frames were to introduce systemic humiliation, in the way apartheid did, this would be extremely significant. Under apartheid, since it was an all-encompassing system, all lives and relationships were tainted with humiliation. It was impossible to dignify apartheid by merely being kinder to each other or creating well-intentioned small-scale initiatives: the entire system had to be shaped anew at the appropriate large-scale level. What if today's apartheid is represented by the fact that (exponential) growth is incompatible with sustainability?
Or should we encourage everybody to agree with Herman Cain, United States Republican presidential candidate, to individualize systemic problems? He said on October 5, 2011: "Don't blame Wall Street. Don't blame the big banks. If you don't have a job and you're not rich, blame yourself." Should we follow Cain and try to make people fitter for a rat race that might be unfeasible and damaging for us all and our environment?
We often feel as helpless as the Archbishop of Canterbury, who called for a "rehumanising of economics", and a "discussion on the relationship between wealth and well-being," in a debate at the British Library on Tuesday evening, on October 1, 2010. "The Archbishop described himself as an 'economic illiterate.' He said the Church had been 'hypnotised by the assertion of expertise' on issues related to the economy."
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin043.php and www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.

• 10 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for National Sovereignty
"The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for National Sovereignty" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
Evelin Lindner's reflections derive from close to forty years of international experience. These are some of her reflections: Throughout history, leaders were known to "unite" countries or even world regions. Unification, wherever it was undertaken, usually had "good" and "bad" aspects: there was the newly-found unity to be celebrated, yet, also oppressive uniformity to be decried. It was not unity in diversity that manifested, but uniformity without diversity. It is not impossible to propose that we, as a human family, find ourselves in a similar situation with respect to globalization today. A fragmented world is being united, globalized, however, this brings not just unity to the fore, also uniformity, in this case it is the uniformity by way of global corporation. The "king" who unites, is now the global corporation. Colonization started with trade, and trade typically treats all players as equal partners. Yet, throughout history, economic power has at some point been translated into political power. This is where we are now: Corporate power is being translated into global political power. National sovereignty is no longer sovereign, but a tool for global power to divide and rule.
What is the solution? A multitude of concepts have been proposed, all with the aim to honor the common interest of all of the human family. Cosmopolitanism, or world federalism are just two concepts to be mentioned. However, as it seems, the most important innovation will be to think in fluid and self-learning systems rather than the traditional rigid fixity. Democracy is already more flexible and adaptable than totalitarian systems, yet, it is not yet adaptable and resilient enough and needs to be developed further. "Harvesting" best practices for consensus building from all cultures around the world is the call of our time (see Lindners' article "Avoiding Humiliation - From Intercultural Communication to Global Interhuman Communication," in the Journal of Intercultural Communication, SIETAR Japan, Number 10, June 2007, pp. 21-38. See a draft for this lecture, which was revised and published in the Journal of Intercultural Communication, SIETAR Japan in June 2007.)
A quote from Lindner's Dignity Economy book: "The transition that is needed at this historical juncture, seems to require two core moves (using Max Weber's ideal-type approach (Lewis A. Coser, 1977, p. 224.): (1) a large enough group of committed citizens at all levels, from civil society to the gatekeepers of political and economic institutions, must muster sufficient awareness of global responsibility to implement (2) new global institutional frames of inclusionism and dignism, new frames that give new form to global institutions, form that would be truly functional for an interdependent world and would serve the interests of all of humankind, not the interests of a few. Institutions (2) have preeminence because decent institutions can drive feedback loops that foster global cooperation in a systemic rather than haphazard way. Any subsequent move will have the advantage of enjoying the support from the system, no longer depending on a few gifted individuals."
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.

• 11 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Peace, Harmony, Reconciliation, and Forgiveness
"The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Peace, Harmony, Reconciliation, and Forgiveness" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
See, among others, the article titled "Why There Can Be No Conflict Resolution as Long as People Are Being Humiliated," with the short version of a response by Finn Tschudi and a rejoinder by the author, see here the long version of A review by Finn Tschudi & Evelin Lindner's responses, July and August 2008, in the International Review of Education, Special Issue on Education for Reconciliation and Conflict Resolution edited by Birgit Brock-Utne, Volume 55 (2-3, May): 157-184, 2009, published in OnlineFirst on 27th December 2008, with DOI 10.1007/s11159-008-9125-9, and ISSN 0020-8566 (Print) and 1573-0638 (Online). Published by Springer (Dordrecht), with the original publication available at www.springerlink.com.
See a quote from Lindner's writing on harmony. "At present, we, the human family on planet Earth, take part in a large-scale historical Zeitgeist shift. It is the transition from unequal to equal worthiness, away from social arrangements where “higher” beings preside over “lesser” beings, toward ranking everybody as equally worthy. The first sentence of Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) states, “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.” This represents also a transition from one definition of harmony to a new definition. Traditionally harmony is being defined as quiet submission of underlings in rigid authoritarian dominator systems (Riane Eisler’s coinage). The new definition acknowledges life as being a process, reality as being in flow, and it manifests itself through a never-ending dialogue between equals who nurture relationships of mutual respect and partnership.
A harmony revolution is profoundly different to former revolutions. In past times, revolutionaries simply replaced their former masters as new dominators, maintaining the same authoritarian style as their former masters, dominating underlings and militating against the "enemy camp." A harmony revolution means more. It means co-creating new forms of living together, as a united human family, in never-ending dialogues between equals who nurture relationships of mutual respect and partnership."
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.
See a copy of this video on a site in China.

• 12 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for a Sustainable World Future
"The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for a Sustainable World Future" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner are the co-authors of the book The Moment Is Now (2012), which explains: "We live in extraordinary times. Never before in history have we, as human species, been presented with a window of opportunity as wide as now. None of our ancestors was able to see pictures of our Blue Planet from the perspective of an astronaut and see how we humans are one species living on one little planet. None of our ancestors lived in a world with such a comprehensive knowledge base, knowledge that - if we decide to use itis substantial enough to tackle all our challenges.
In a shrunk world, in contrast, we are now faced with the undeniable reality of global interdependence, a reality that is making itself felt in ways that would astonish our forefathers. Living on one planet has never been about anything else but interdependence—a planetary ecosphere is interconnected by default—however, this fact was obscured by lack of knowledge and by the dynamics of the security dilemma. Today, human interdependence must be taken seriously, it must be addressed with urgency. We now have the means to understand and to act upon the new reality that the world has grown too small for walls and too small for wars. Security is no longer to be had in the same ways as in the past. In the past, contention and enforced separation sometimes did bring a certain measure of security, at least temporarily. Powerful empires did succeed in giving their citizens a sense of security, at least as long as they had rulers who guarded and expanded the empire’s borders with due ruthlessness and cunning. In contrast, security in an interconnected world can only be had by nurturing relationships of global cohesion. Cohesion that is informed by equal dignity for all, a dignity that is manifested through the principle of unity in diversity."
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.

• 13 The Role of Human Rights Ideals for Honor, Dignity, Shame, and Humiliation
"The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Peace, Harmony, Reconciliation, and Forgiveness" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
See, among others, the article titled "How the Human Rights Ideal of Equal Dignity Separates Humiliation from Shame," written for the Journal of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in 2007. Please see the first draft here.
Abstract: Usually, science, at least until recently, has been dominated by Western scholars. Therefore, much research is situated in Western cultural contexts. A Western scholar typically begins research within his or her own cultural setting and then makes some allowances for historic and cultural variations. In the case of research on emotions, the focus is usually on affect, feeling, emotion, script, character and personality, while larger cultural contexts and an analysis of historic periods in human history are less emphasized. Dialogue and bridge-building with other academic fields and other cultural realms are not easy to achieve even in today’s increasingly connected world.
The author of this article has lived as a global citizen for more than thirty years (due to being born into a displaced family) and has thus acquired an understanding not just for one or two cultural realms, but for many. The result is that she paints a broad picture that includes historic and transcultural dimensions. In this article the usual approach is inversed: Larger cultural contexts as they were shaped throughout human history are used as a lens to understand emotions, with particular emphasis, in this article, on humiliation and shame. This is not to deny the importance of research on affect, feeling, emotion, script, character and personality, but to expand it.
Subsequent to the conclusion of the doctoral dissertation on humiliation in 2001, the author has expanded her studies, among others, in Europe, South East Asia, and the United States. She is currently building a theory of humiliation that is transcultural and transdisciplinary, entailing elements from anthropology, history, social philosophy, social psychology, sociology, and political science.
The central point of this article is that shame and humiliation are not a-historic emotional processes, but historical-cultural-social-emotional constructs that change over time. Humiliation began to separate out from the humility-shame-humiliation continuum around three hundred years ago, and there are two mutually excluding concepts of humiliation in use today around the world, one that is old, and one that is new.
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.

• 14 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Conflict
"The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Conflict" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
In her second book, Emotion and Conflict: How Human Rights Can Dignify Emotion and Help Us Wage Good Conflict (2009), Lindner describes how realizing the promise of equality in dignity can help improve the human condition at all levels—from micro to meso to macro levels. This book uses a broad historical perspective that captures all of human history, from its hunter-gatherer origins to the promise of a globally united knowledge society in the future. It emphasizes the need to recognize and leave behind malign cultural, social, and psychological effects of the past. The book calls upon the world community, academics and lay people alike, to own up to the opportunities offered by increasing global interdependence. Please see more details on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin041.php.
Quoted from the Emotion and Conflict book (p. xv): "Imagine that you are a social worker and Eve is a woman in your district. She is regularly and severely beaten by her husband, Adam. You are afraid that Eve might not survive the abuse. Neighbors describe scenes of shouting and crying, and the bruises on Eve’s body are only too obvious. You visit her as frequently as your schedule permits. You try to convince her to protect herself better, for example by leaving her unsafe home and seeking refuge in protected housing designed for cases like hers. You consider her a victim and her husband a perpetrator. You explain that “domestic chastisement” has long been outlawed. You suggest that Adam’s behavior humiliates her and urge her to develop a “healthy” rage as a first step toward collecting sufficient strength to change her life for the better. In your eyes, this situation clearly represents a destructive conflict loaded with hot and violent emotion and you wish to contribute to its constructive resolution.
Sometimes, Eve is so exhausted that she seems to listen to you. At other times, however, she resists you, arguing: “Beating me is my husband’s way of loving me! I am not a victim! It is all my fault! I bring it upon myself! My grandmother taught me that arrogant women sin against divine traditions! We have to respect our traditions!” Her husband, of course, adamantly refuses to be labeled a perpetrator. He accuses you of viciously disturbing the peace of his home, of violating his male honor. To Adam, there is no destructive conflict, no suffering victim, no violent perpetrator—except in your mind, the mind of the social worker, a third party.
You cannot help remembering the South African elite and its defensiveness about apartheid. You also think of the current attention to so-called honor killings and how this practice has recently moved from the neutral category of cultural practice to the accusatory category of violation of human rights. Or the Indian caste system, that has only recently been renamed “Indian apartheid.” All such framings—unsurprisingly—do not meet with friendly acceptance from the supposed perpetrators."
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.
See a copy of this video on a site in China.

• 15. The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Love, Hate, and Other Emotions

"The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Love, Hate, and Other Emotions" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
For Evelin Lindner, feelings of humiliation are "the nuclear bomb of the emotions." In her doctoral research, she analyzes how, during the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, were forced to "choose" between two "loves" in the service of cycles of humiliation. Her four-year doctoral research project in social psychology was titled The Feeling of Being Humiliated: A Central Theme in Armed Conflicts. A Study of the Role of Humiliation in Somalia, and Rwanda/Burundi, Between the Warring Parties, and in Relation to Third Intervening Parties (2000, University of Oslo).
In her second book, Emotion and Conflict: How Human Rights Can Dignify Emotion and Help Us Wage Good Conflict (2009), Lindner describes how realizing the promise of equality in dignity can help improve the human condition at all levels—from micro to meso to macro levels. This book uses a broad historical perspective that captures all of human history, from its hunter-gatherer origins to the promise of a globally united knowledge society in the future. It emphasizes the need to recognize and leave behind malign cultural, social, and psychological effects of the past. The book calls upon the world community, academics and lay people alike, to own up to the opportunities offered by increasing global interdependence. Please see more details on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin041.php.
She wrote, among others, in her Emotion and Conflict book (2009): "In Kenya, I heard stories of Hutu genocidaires who were in hiding and needed psychotherapy because they could not eat without seeing the small fingers of children on their plates. Many Hutus had been forced to kill their own families, their Tutsi spouses and Tutsi-looking children, to show their allegiance to the Hutu cause. Their love for the Hutu cause became pitted against their love for their family. After the genocide, they were alone, deprived of their beloved family-and the killers were none but themselves. The International Panel of Eminent Personalities confirms: "Hutu women married to Tutsi men were sometimes compelled to murder their Tutsi children to demonstrate their commitment to Hutu Power. The effect on these mothers is . . . beyond imagining."
...
This book attempts to show how the concept of ranked honor is the single largest “master manipulation” ever perpetrated (and still virulent, see more in Chapter 8). The driving force is the hideous suggestion entailed in ranked honor that it is unavoidable, either divinely ordained or nature’s order, that dignity is not equal but that “higher” beings are meant to preside over “lower” beings who are expected to subject themselves to their masters’ belief systems and decisions. In this way, ranked honor underlies and facilitates all other manipulations—it gives the power to define what is and what ought to be to a small master elite.
...
Only if we deeply understand the ideals of ranked honor versus equality in dignity can we forge a constructive transition to the latter. It is encouraging that slavery and apartheid are no longer regarded as legitimate almost everywhere on the globe. Or, for the most recent success on this path, it is a step forward that more than one hundred nations agreed in Dublin on May 30, 2008, on a treaty that will ban current designs of cluster bombs. Yet our psyches—even among the most enlightened human rights advocates—are still filled with bits and pieces of the emotional cluster bombs that our past cultural and social environments placed there. Inside ourselves and between ourselves, myriad destructive processes are still at work—we have yet to fully grasp the opportunities that human rights offer.
...
Throughout history, underlings have died for the honor of their masters, advised to define their own honor as faithful identification with their masters, without regard for their own health and survival and without questioning the reality of honor. Adolf Hitler required his followers to be ready to die for him “with enthusiasm” (“begeistert sterben”) Interview with Paul Lindner, July 22, 2008. And at the end, even the powerful themselves may pay with their own lives. Hitler’s “glory” ultimately ended in wretched death also for him personally.
...
Masters want their underlings to love them, and to hate their master's enemies. Love and hatred are being prescribed within a dominator context.
In short, honor (or, more precisely, the ranking order that is entailed in systems of honor and often in systems of power in general—read more in Chapter 5), driven by emotions, can have horrendous outcomes. Its potential for dismal destructiveness was always apparent, even in the past; however, its occasional successes worked to outweigh the perception of risk. Yet in today’s interdependent world, the concept of honor (and concepts of power that define power as “power over others”) is no longer suitable, and its outfall is even more negative. Destructive conflict is created unnecessarily when honor steers conflict resolution today. Today, global interdependence represents the ultimate deterrent for violent conflict resolution informed by honor—we need to learn much more constructive approaches to conflict."
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.
See a copy of this video on a site in China.

• 16 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Love and Sexuality
"The Role of Dignity and Humiliation for Love and Sexuality" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
Gender, Humiliation, and Global Security: Dignifying Relationships from Love, Sex, and Parenthood to World Affairs (2010) is Evelin Lindner's third book. Archbishop Desmond Tutu contributed with a Foreword. The book rounds off with an Afterword by Linda Hartling in honor of Jean Baker Miller and Don Klein. The book examines the social and political ramifications of human violations and world crises related to humiliation. It charts how humiliation is conditioned into individuals by large-scale, and systemic social forces. It offers ideas for counteracting the powerful psychological effects of humiliation in order to encourage constructive social, political, and cultural change. The book is being "highly recommended" by Choice (in July 2010).
Quoted from the Gender, Humiliation, and Global Security book (p. 96): "Humankind learned to make fire; we learned to burn fossil fuel and utilize its force. We still have a long way to go until we efficiently make use of the force of nonfinite and nonpolluting resources such as the sun, the wind, the movement of waves and tides, geothermal heat, or perhaps even of the zero-point field.
With love, we have not yet even succeeded in making fire. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin opened the Introduction to this book by saying, “Someday, after mastering the winds, the waves, the tides and gravity, we shall harness the energies of love, and then, for a second time in the history of the world, man will have discovered fire.”
Our relationship with love is unsophisticated and wasteful. Early hominids were presumably impressed by the force of the fires that at times ravaged the savannah. Likewise, we are impressed by the force of love when it comes down on us like wildfire. Early hominids could not imagine that their successors in the 21st century would succeed in using this force to change almost all aspects of our lives, from powering airplanes to staying connected through the Internet. Similarly, we cannot imagine today that the use of the force of love will change all aspects of human life in the future (under the condition that humankind has not annihilated itself before reaching this new level of expertise)."
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin042.php, and www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.
See a copy of this video on a site in China.

• 17 Evelin Lindner: Global Research Experience: Egypt, Rwanda-Burundi, Somalia, Japan, China, USA, Europe
"Global Research Experience" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
Evelin Lindner was interviewed by The Muses Journal: Love, Peace and Wisdom in 2005, and said: "'Never again' was to become central for my life. My life has turned out to be a 'project' rather than a 'normal life,' a project with the aim to learn about the world in order to apply lessons for 'never again.' My medical studies are part of this larger project. Already as a schoolgirl, I was interested in the world's cultures and languages and I eventually learned to familiarise myself with around 12 languages, among them the key languages of the world. My aim was to become part of other cultures, not only 'visit' 'them.' I wanted to develop a gut feeling for how people in different cultures define life and death, conflict and peace, love and hate, and how they look at 'others.' As a medical student, I was able to work in many parts of the world and immerse myself into various cultures."
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php. See a copy of this video on a site in China.

• 18 Evelin Lindner: A Personal Path From Humiliating Displacement to the Dignity of Global Citizenship
"A Personal Path From Humiliating Displacement to the Dignity of Global Citizenship" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
Evelin Lindner's aim it to help increase awareness that we, as a human species, form one singe human family on a tiny home planet, whose stewardship is our shared responsibility. See her reflections on her website:
"It is important for me to make clear that my global life is not a homeless or restless life. I do not even use the term "travel," since I live in the global village and in a village one does not travel, one lives there, even if one moves around in it. When I look for cultural templates for my life, which treats our planet as one undivided locality, I can think of migrating animist hunter-gatherers, a way of life that defined being human prior to 10,000 years ago. I resonate with what indigenous native American leader Sitting Bull (1831-1890) said: "White men like to dig in the ground for their food. My people prefer to hunt the buffalo… White men like to stay in one place. My people want to move their tepees here and there to different hunting grounds. The life of white men is slavery. They are prisoners in their towns or farms. The life my people want is freedom." Clearly, I do not hunt buffalo, and I do not have a teepee. Yet, what I do is refraining from defining a small geographical locality as "my home." My home is the entire global village, or more precisely, the people I love in that village. I do not even see my life as nomadic, and, as mentioned above, I do not resonate with the notion of travel. To my view, I "stay in love," rather than "travel in circles in a caged rat race." In other words, I see myself being much more "still" and true to "my place," namely love, than those who sell out their soul for a rat race that is defined by large-scale societal frames that have increasingly become toxic during the past decades. I see many people travel extensively, yet, usually, they have a "caged rat race" frame within which they travel. I prefer to "stay still" in the realm of love. I am closer to a person who chooses to opt out of the rat race to live a simpler life nearer to nature, for example, than to a frequent business flyer who travels in circles in the isolated elite bubble of international hotels. I never search for a "place to stay." I move between different relational contexts of love and "a place to stay" is secondary to being embedded into relationships of mutual care."
Please see also "How Becoming a Global Citizen Can Have a Healing Effect," a paper presented at the 2006 ICU-COE Northeast Asian Dialogue: Sharing Narratives, Weaving/Mapping History, February 3-5, 2006, International Christian University (ICU), Tokyo, Japan.
See also Jackie Wasilewski's invitation, pictures from Evelin's camera, and the organizers' pictures.
Introduction to the paper: "First versions of this paper were written for the 2006 ICU-COE Northeast Asian Boundary-spanning Dialogue Project ("Sharing Narratives, Weaving/Mapping History," February 3-5, 2006, International Christian University, Tokyo, Japan). The participants were divided into four circles and encouraged to present their personal histories. A great sense of enthusiasm, almost exhilaration, permeated the Dialogue weekend. One of the most exiting aspects was that everybody had the permission to be a "human being" - as opposed to "a Chinese," or "a Korean," or "a Japanese." Usually, by stepping out of in-group definitions, one has to pay by sacrificing one's sense of belonging and mutual connection. During the Dialogue weekend, nobody was punished for failing to be adequately "loyal" to their in-group; nobody was ostracized for failing to be sufficiently "Japanese," or "Korean," or "Chinese." On the contrary, a new "in-group membership" was on offer - the membership in all humankind. No longer had the participants to carefully hide "unfitting" aspects of themselves; on the contrary, everybody was encouraged to just be "me" and would still be connected and loved. In the Dialogue weekend, everybody was allowed to break out of narrow in-group boundaries and forge a new in-group community, humankind.
In this paper I first outline how I initially felt a painful sense of not-belonging (I am born into a refugee family) and how I proceeded to building a deeply fulfilling and satisfying global identity. In the subsequent section I discuss what I gained with this approach. I conclude with advocating that we all need to cooperate in building an inclusive world for all."
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.
See a copy of this video on a site in China.

• 19 Global Citizenship as Path to Dignity and Prevention of Humiliation
"Global Citizenship as Path to Dignity and Prevention of Humiliation" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
Evelin Lindner writes (in one of her upcoming books on dignity): "The caring element in anthropologist Alan Page Fiske's communal sharing (CS) template is currently stepping into the limelight and is taken more seriously, however, it needs to be highlighted and prioritized more, and more systematically.
The global village is currently acquiring a life of its own, beyond McLuhan’s initial connotations, but this process needs to be guided proactively. Citizens increasingly relate to each other across borders, states are losing their status as more or less isolated entities that constrain and define their citizens’ global relationships, however, such relationships can turn sour. Global terrorism is only one example for the fact that globalization does not necessarily lead to global friendship.
Even though a global 'supranational We-feeling' is in the making, and the 'struggle for recognition' by individuals alongside that of states is emerging as a force at the system level, such tendencies need to be nurtured and helped forward more systematically. We do see postindividual consciousness emerge (G. Heard, The Five Ages of Man, 1963), or unity consciousness (M. Hollick, The Science of Oneness: A Worldview for the Twenty-First Century, 2006), or a “Kantian culture” of collective security or “friendship” (A. Wendt, Social Theory of International Politics, 1999), or a global civic culture (E. Boulding, Building a Global Civic Culture: Education for an Interdependent World, 1988), or a world society (Alexander Wendt’s stage three).
A growing number of people are now joining the so-called cultural creatives movement and refuse “cynical realism” (P. H. Ray and S. R. Anderson, The Cultural Creatives: How 50 Million People Are Changing the World, 2000). Paul H. Ray and Sherry Ruth Anderson identify three main cultural tendencies: firstly moderns (endorsing the “realist” worldview of Time Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, big government, big business, big media, or past socialist, communist, and fascist movements); second, the first countermovement against moderns, the traditionals (the religious right and rural populations); and third, the most recent countermovement, the cultural creatives (valuing strong ecological sustainability for the planet, liberal on women’s issues, personal growth, authenticity, and antibig business). In the United States, traditionals comprise about 24-26 percent of the adult population (approximately 48 million people), moderns about 47-49 percent (approximately 95 million) and cultural creatives are about 26-28 percent (approximately 50 million). In the European Union, the cultural creatives are about 30-35 percent of the adult population.
What is lacking at the current point in human history is global leadership that informs the creation of a decent global community of social and ecological sustainability, following the call for a decent society by philosopher Avishai Margalit (The Decent Society, 1996). Viable global superordinate institutional structures are still lacking, structures that can effectively overcome Hobbesian anarchy among citizens and states and that can successfully attend to the wounds humankind has inflicted on its ecological environment."
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.
See a copy of this video on a site in China.

• 20 How to Be a Mandela and Create a World of Freedom and Dignity Instead of Fighting for Individual Freedom in an Undignified World?
"How to Be a Mandela and Create a World of Freedom and Dignity instead of Fighting for Individual Freedom in an Undignified World?" is a video that was recorded by Linda Hartling, in Portland, Oregon, USA, on October 30, 2011, for the World Dignity University initiative.
Margaret Mead said: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”
Evelin Lindner, together with her colleagues, aim to act on Margaret Mead's saying when they work to manifest equal dignity for all living beings as a two-tiered refolution (Timothy Ash), or a two-tiered evolutionary reconstruction (Gar Alperovitz), and it must become a continuous, never-ending refolution. It is a two-tiered process because not just dominators are to be taken down, the dominator model itself is to be taken down. In former times, when rulers were toppled by revolution, their usurpers kept the system in place without reforming it; former underlings became the new dominators. The new partnership model, in contrast, calls for entirely new ways of living together.
The new ways are those of equal dignity manifested through unity in diversity, rather than uniformity and division. The new ways emphasize continuous process and fluidity, rather than rigidity. They emphasize learning, co-creating, moving ahead together. Partnership cannot be forced, it cannot be commanded, it cannot be straight jacketed into rigid rules. Partnership must be nudged and nurtured, through lovingly asking questions, through creating common ground, through forming relationships of social cohesion, from where we can walk together toward a more favorable future for all.
The Emotion and Conflict book recommends an action plan for humankind with two core loops to travel, (1) acquiring new awareness for global responsibility, (2) acquiring new personal skills of cooperation, and (3) creating new global institutional frames that enable new forms of global and local cooperation. Institutions (3) have preeminence because decent institutions can drive feedback loops that foster (1) and (2) in systemic rather than haphazard ways. The first loop, the initial realization of new institutions, depends on a few Nelson Mandela-like individuals, who “nudge” the world’s systems into a more constructive frame. The second and subsequent loops will have the advantage of enjoying the support from the system, no longer only depending on a few gifted individuals. A new culture has to emerge, locally and globally, at all societal, social, and psychological levels, a truly humane culture of Unity in Diversity, where people have access to the full range of their emotions and learn to regulate them so that their motivational force can drive the creation of an ecologically and socially sustainable world rather than a world of destruction.
See more on www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/evelin02.php.
See a copy of this video on a site in China.

• 20.1 Humiliation and Terrorism (UiO Podcast edition | YouTube editions Part 1 | Part 2 dialogue)
Lecture at the Department of Psychology / Psykologisk institutt at the University of Oslo, Norway (Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, Auditorium 1, as part of PSYC3203 – Anvendt sosialpsykologi, see also www.sv.uio.no), 25th January, 2012, 10.15-12.00. See video tape and pictures.

• 21 "Do We Need Concepts such as Humiliation, Dignity, and Respect to Understand Majority/Minority Relations?," in high density and MP4 format
Video created on 10th May 2012 in the Valle de las Animas (Valley of the Souls) near La Paz, Bolivia, as a contribution to the seminar "Majority and Immigrants: Social Psychological Aspects" to be held on 31st May 2012 at the Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway, in honour of Reidar Ommundsen. See here some still pictures of the 10th May.
Located 40 minutes from La Paz, at about 4,000 meters above sea-level, the Canyon and Lagoon of the Souls is a sacred place to the Aymara inhabitants of the Andean highlands who come here to offer burnt-offering ceremonies to the imposing Mountain Gods that overlook our Valley, Mount Illimani (6,438 meters above sea-level) and Mururata (5,871 meters above sea-level).

• 22 The Scale of Humiliation - What Are the Smallest and Largest Effects/Impact of Humiliation in the World?
This is a video produced by Evelin Lindner and Gabriela Saab in São Paulo, Brazil, on 22nd May 2012, in response to the BBC Radio planning a programme on humiliation research. The video provides examples from the macro to the micro level of human relationships (the international, intergroup, interpersonal, and intrapersonal levels, as well as the relationship with our ecosphere).
The video begins with the global level, considering the following question: Are there connections between humiliation and genocide at the global level? The link between help provided to Somalia and help withheld from Rwanda can serve as an example to illustrate this question. For intergroup dynamics the 1994 genocide in Rwanda can serve as an example at the intergroup level (errratum: In the example of Rwanda, the patron-client ties that existed between Tutsi and Hutu, evidently, lasted for centuries, not just decades). The practice of honor killing is being highlighted as an example for humiliation playing out between families and within families.
This is the request from the BBC: Lucy Greenwell wrote to Linda Hartling (22nd May 2012): "... Our programme is very unformed at the moment, I am in the process of researching the subject, and trying to find real human stories that illustrate the effects of humiliation in the world. We find that the best stories for our series tend to be the personal ones. What appeals to me about humiliation as a subject is the incredibly personal nature of it (so there will certainly be lots of small local stories about humiliation) but at the same time the grand scale of it, the way it's a global issue. I am interested to hear from you about this scale of humiliation - what are the smallest and largest effects/impact of humiliation in the world?
I guess what would be wonderful was if you were able to point me in the direction of fascinating real stories that shed light on the importance of this issues. Are there any unfolding stories that are particularly interesting? Most people think humiliation means being shown up publicly at work, or in front of friends. Is this what it really is? Is there more to it than that? I read that a survey found that 91% of people had considered murdering someone in their lives - and the main reason given was that they were humiliated by them. ... Really looking forward to it, Lucy, Lucy Greenwell, Producer.
See a copy of this video on a site in China.

• 23 A Letter to my Father - Memories of Humiliation in International Conflicts
Lecture in the course of literature by Dr. Laura P. Zuntini of Izarra, the Faculty of Philosophy and Humanities, Department of Modern Languages​​, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, 24th May 2012.
Português: Palestra no curso de literatura pela Dra. Laura P. Zuntini de Izarra, na Faculdade de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas, Departamento de Letras Modernas, Universidade de São Paulo, Brasil, 24 de Maio 2012.
Please see here the video of this lecture. Gabriela Saab kindly did the video-taping. Please see here still pictures, kindly taken by Marcelle Guil. Please see here still photos, kindly taken by Marcelle Guil. See here the entire São Paulo Agenda organized by Gabriela Saab.
See a copy of this video on a site in China.

• 24 International Law in Relation to Humiliation and Armed Conflict
Lecture in the course taught by Prof. Cláudia Perrone-Moisés at the Faculty of Law in the International Criminal Law, University of São Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, 24th May, 2012.
Português: Humilhação e Conflito Armado, palestra na Faculdade de Direito (sala Miguel Reale, 3º. Andar) no curso Direito Internacional Penal ministrado pela Profa. Dra. Cláudia Perrone-Moisés, Universidade de São Paulo, Brasil, 24 de Maio 2012.
Please see here the video of this lecture. Fabricio Rodrigo Costa kindly did the video-taping. Please see here still photos, kindly taken by Marcelle Guil. See here the entire São Paulo Agenda organized by Gabriela Saab. See also Professor Murilo Jardelino da Costa without whom this programme would not be the same! Thank you, dear Gaby and Murilo!

• 25 Educação, Conflitos e Democracia
Mesa-redonda, participação de Evelin Lindner e Annie Dymetman, doutora em Sociologia, e membro-fundadora da Casa da Mediação de Conflitos na Universidade São Judas Tadeu. Mediação Helena Singer (pós-doutora pela Universidade Estadual de Campinas e diretora pedagógica da Associação Cidade Escola Aprendiz). Memorial da América Latina, Sala dos Espelhos, Av. Auro Soares de Moura Andrade, 664, Saõ Paulo, Brasil, 29 de Maio 2012.
English: Education, Conflict and Democracy, roundtable, participation by Evelin Lindner and Annie Dymetman, PhD in Sociology, and a founding member of the House of Conflict Resolution at the University São Judas Tadeu. Mediation by Helena Singer (post-doctorate from the University of Campinas and pedagogical director of the Associação Cidade Escola Aprendiz).
Please see the invitation. See also still pictures.

• 26 Humiliation, Dignity and Reconciliation / Humilhação, Dignidade e Reconciliação
Palestra em inglês com tradução consecutiva. Centro Universitário Maria Antonia da Universidade de São Paulo, Salão Nobre Rua Maria Antônia, 258, 3º andar, Vila Buarque, São Paulo, SP. Coordenação Sergio Adorno (FFLCH, NEV e Cátedra UNESCO - USP). Mediação Guilherme Assis de Almeida (Faculdade de Direito - USP). Apoio: Cátedra da UNESCO na USP (Cátedra Educação para a Paz, Democracia, Direitos Humanos e Tolerância), 1º de junho de 2012, 20h.
English: Lecture in English with consecutive translation together with Professor Sergio Adorno, Professor of Sociology, University of São Paulo. Mediation Guilherme Assis de Almeida, Law School, University of São Paulo. Supported by the UNESCO Chair Education for Peace, Democracy, Human Rights and Tolerance, and the Centro Maria Antônia at the University of São Paulo, 1st June 2012.
Please see the invitation. Please see also the video of this lecture. See still pictures. See here the entire São Paulo Agenda so kindly organized by Gabriela Saab.

• 27 Humilhação, Dignidade e Direitos Humanos
"Humilhação, Dignidade e Direitos Humanos," talk by Evelin Lindner to the Committee for Human Rights and Minorities at the Chamber of Deputies in Brasília, Brazil, 5th June 2012. She was invited by Deputado Domingos Dutra, President of the Committee for Human Rights and Minorities, and Ricardo Jose Pereira Rodrigues, Senior Policy Specialist in the Office of Legislative Counsel and Policy Guidance at the Chamber of Deputies. Clara Becker explained Evelin's thoughts in Portuguese. The historical moment for this talk was timely: On 16th May 2012, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff had just inaugurated a truth commission to investigate rights abuses, including those committed during military rule.
Português: "Humilhação, Dignidade e Direitos Humanos," palestra na Comissão de Direitos Humanos e Minorias, Câmara dos Deputados, Brasília, Brasil, 5 de Junho 2012. Clara Becker explicou pensamentos Evelin em Português. O momento histórico para esta palestra foi oportuna: No dia 16 de Maio de 2012, o presidente brasileiro, Dilma Rousseff, tinha acabado de inaugurar uma comissão da verdade para investigar abusos de direitos humanos, incluindo aqueles cometidos durante o regime militar.
• See the announcement prior to the event (or see here)
• Listen to an audio clip from the event
• Read a summary after the event (or see here)
• Please click here to see still photos.

• 27.2 Creating a Dignified World: A Video Message to the Brazilian People from Evelin Lindner
This video message was recorded by journalist Alex Paniago after the talk "Humilhação, Dignidade e Direitos Humanos," that Evelin Lindner gave for the Committee for Human Rights and Minorities at the Chamber of Deputies in Brasília, Brazil, on 5th June 2012. She was invited by Deputado Domingos Dutra, President of the Committee for Human Rights and Minorities, and Ricardo Jose Pereira Rodrigues, Senior Policy Specialist in the Office of Legislative Counsel and Policy Guidance at the Chamber of Deputies. Clara Becker explained Evelin's thoughts in Portuguese.
Português: "Humilhação, Dignidade e Direitos Humanos," palestra na Comissão de Direitos Humanos e Minorias, Câmara dos Deputados, Brasília, Brasil, 5 de Junho 2012. Clara Becker explicou pensamentos Evelin em Português.
• See the announcement prior to the event (or see here)
• Listen to an audio clip from the event
• Read a summary after the event (or see here)
• Please click here to see still photos.

• 28 The Role of Dignity and Humiliation in Regard to Peace, Harmony, Reconciliation and Forgiveness / O papel da Dignidade e da Humilhação no que Concerne à Paz, à Humanização e à Conciliação em Contextos Familiar e Universitário (English, with simultaneous translation into Portuguese)
This was a lecture at the Center for Philosophy and Humanities of the University of Pernambuco in Recife, Brazil, 12th June 2012. When you watch the video (see Part I and Part II), please be aware that Evelin listens to the Portuguese translation through earphones and that the pauses are caused by her waiting for Fatiha Dechicha Parahyba, the translator, to finish before continueing.
See a brief video in Portuguese (see the mp4 the flv version) by Maria José Luna, current president of the Dom Helder Camara Human Rights Commission at the University of Pernambuco, and Director of the Federal University of Pernambuco Press.
Português: Palestra na Centro de Filosofia e Ciências Humana, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, Brasil, 12 de Junho 2012. Quando você assistir ao vídeo (Part I e Part II), por favor, esteja ciente de que Evelin ouve a tradução Português através de fones de ouvido e que as pausas são causados ​​por ela à espera de Fatiha Dechicha Parahyba, o tradutor, para terminar antes de continuar. Veja um breve vídeo em Português por Maria José Luna, atual presidente do Dom Helder Camara Comissão de Direitos Humanos da Universidade de Pernambuco e Diretor da UFPE Imprensa.
See the announcements prior to the event, both as a poster and on the UFPE website 1 + 2.
Please click here to see still photos from Evelin's camera, and here to see still photos from UFPE's official camera.

• 29 Evelin Lindner: Education, Dignity, and Crosscultural Communication
Workshop in English at the Associação Brasil-América (ABA) for the ABA administrative-cultural staff and faculty, invited by Eduardo J. G. Carvalho, Executive Director of ABA, and ABA Co-founder Francisco Cardoso Gomes de Matos, Recife, Brazil, 15th June 2012. See the announcement and the invitation. See also the article Humilihação e Dignidade by Tereza Halliday, published in the newspaper Diário de Pernambuco on 4th June 2012.
Please see here photos from Evelin's camera. May I draw your attention to the work of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS, www.humiliationstudies.org), a global transdisciplinary fellowship of concerned academics and practitioners who wish to promote dignity and transcend humiliation. We wish to stimulate systemic change, globally and locally, to open space for mutual respect and esteem to take root and grow, thus ending humiliating practices and breaking cycles of humiliation throughout the world. We are currently around 1,000 personally invited members, and our website is being accessed by between 20,000 and 40,000 people from more than 180 countries per year.
See a copy of this video on a site in China.

• 30 Fostering Global Citizenship
In: Peter T. Coleman and Morton Deutsch (Eds.), Psychological Components of Sustainable Peace: An Introduction, Peace Psychology Book Series, New York, Springer Science+Business Media, 2012, DOI 10.1007/978-1-4614-3555-6_1, ISBN: 978-1-4614-3554-9, ISBN 978-1-4614-3555-6 (eBook), chapter 15, pp. 283-298. See the flyer and invitation to the book launch on November 7, 2012. Please see the video of the book launch on the ICCCR website and on YouTube.
•  Abstract: The purpose of this book is to enhance understanding of sustainable peace by supplementing the standard approach of studying the prevention of destructive conflict, violence, war and injustice with the equally important investigation of the promotion of the basic conditions and processes conducive to lasting peace. For in addition to addressing the pervasive realities of oppression, violence and war, peace requires us to understand and envision what alternatives we wish to construct. Recognizing the ultimate need for multidisciplinary frameworks to best comprehend and foster sustainable peace, we hoped to elicit what contemporary psychology might have to contribute to such a framework. This chapter provides a brief historical and conceptual context for the many fine scholarly chapters that follow in the book.

Contents:

• 1. Psychological Components of Sustainable Peace: An Introduction, Morton Deutsch and Peter T. Coleman, 1-14
•  2. Effective Cooperation, The Foundation of Sustainable Peace, David W. Johnson, Roger T. Johnson and Dean Tjosvold, 15-53
•  3. Constructive Conflict Resolution and Sustainable Peace, Peter T. Coleman, 55-84
•  4. Creative Problem Solving: Not Just About the Problem, Daniel L. Shapiro, 85-104
•  5. Transforming Communication for Peace, Beth Fisher-Yoshida, 105-120
•  6. LIF PLUS: The Life-Improving Force of Peaceful Language Use, Francisco Gomes de Matos, 121-129
•  7. The Role of Equality in Negotiation and Sustainable Peace, Cecilia Albin and Daniel Druckman, 131-151
•  8. Sustaining Peace through Psychologically Informed Policies: The Geohistorical Context of Malaysia, Daniel J. Christie and Noraini M. Noor, 153-175
•  9. Justice, Activity, and Narrative: Studying of the World March for Peace and Nonviolence, Carolina Muñoz Proto and Susan Opotow, 177-196
•  10. Gender and Sustainable Peace, Abigail Disney and Leymah Gbowee, 197-203
•  11. The Psychodynamics of Peace, Alon Gratch, 205-225
•  12. Culture of Peace, Douglas P. Fry and Marta Miklikowska, 227-243
•  13. Reconciliation Between Groups, the Prevention of Violence, and Lasting Peace, Ervin Staub, 245-263
•  14. Sustainable Peace: A Dynamical Systems Perspective, Andrzej Nowak, Lan Bui-Wrzosinska, Robin Vallacher and Peter T. Coleman, 265-281
•  15: Fostering Global Citizenship, Evelin Lindner, 283-298
•  16. A Framework for Thinking About Developing a Global Community, Morton Deutsch, Eric C. Marcus and Sarah Brazaitis, 299-324
•  17. Education for Sustainable Peace: Practices, Problems and Possibilities, Betty A. Reardon, 325-352
•  18. Conclusion: The Essence of Peace? Toward a Comprehensive and Parsimonious Model of Sustainable Peace, Peter T. Coleman, 353-369

When Evelin Lindner was first invited to contribute with a chapter to this book, its first working title was The Psychological Components of a Sustainable, Humane, Peaceful World.
The papers listed further down represent the first four drafts for this chapter, developed from February 2010 to December 2010. The papers are rather different from each other. They illustrate the process of developing the ideas for this chapter. The title of each draft was suggested by Morton Deutsch, as was the main structure of each paper, including most of the main section headings. The titles and the section headings thus represent a question, or a challenge posed by Morton Deutsch to Evelin Lindner to respond to. The text of each section can therefore be read as a responses to Morton Deutsch's formulation of the headings.
• Paper 4, March 10, 2011: Fostering Global Citizenship 2
• Paper 3, October 15, 2010: Fostering Global Citizenship 1
• Paper 2, May 30, 2010: Why Global Citizenship Is Needed for Global Peace
• Paper 1, February 25, 2010: Harmonious and Sustainable Peaceful Relations: How They Can Be Fostered by Fulfilling Basic Human Needs and Nurturing Positive Emotions and How the Frustration of Basic Needs Can Lead to Destructive Emotions and Interactions

• 31 A Dignity Economy: Creating an Economy that Serves Human Dignity and Preserves Our Planet
Lindner, Evelin (2012). A Dignity Economy: Creating an Economy that Serves Human Dignity and Preserves Our Planet. Lake Oswego, OR; World Dignity University Press.
Book presentation and introduction of the term dignism at Columbia University, Teachers College, Gottesman Library, room Russell 104b, on December 5, 2012, 4:30-6 pm. The video recording was carried out by Hua-Chu Yen.
See the invitation flyer and the event in the Gottesman Library Calendar. See the video-tape on blip.tv and on YouTube.

• 31.1 Dignity and Humiliation: Norway and the Concept of likeverd (UiO Podcast edition | YouTube edition)
See a summary in Norwegian by Tone B. Bergflødt, Om vår kulturelle arv og om ydmykelse: The nuclear bomb of emotions.
Annual open lecture at the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo in Norway, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, 23rd March 2013. We thank the Department of Psychology for this invitation and Lasse Moer for a fantastic video documantation.

• 32 Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies: Transdisciplinarity in Practice
This workshop on 'Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies: Transdisciplinarity in Practice' was convened by Robert Morrell, co-ordinator of the Programme for the Enhancement of Research Capacity (PERC), University of Cape Town, South Africa, on 4th July 2013. Evelin Lindner explains the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network (www.humiliationstudies.org). Thando Mgqolozana did the video recording. See still pictures.

• 33 Konstruktive Veränderungsprozesse in der Behandlung von traumatisierten oder anders gedemütigten Menschen
Referat 5 (simultan übersetzt ins Französische), im PSY & PSY-Kongress 2013 "Übergänge - eine Herausforderung / Les défits de la transition," einem gemeinsamen Kongress der Psychologen- und Psychiaterverbände der Schweiz in Montreux, Schweiz, 13. September 2013, 15.30 - 16.30. Ich danke besonders Heidi Aeschlimann und Hans Kurt.
Sie sehen hier:
Vortrag als Powerpoint Präsentation mit Audio und Video vom 18. September 2013 (in case of trouble with downloading the document here, it is also stored on Dropbox, and Linda Hartling created a YouTube version.)
Manuskript des Vortrages vom 18. September 2013
Photos
Four Horsemen - Feature Documentary, 2013, recommended by Anthony Marsella.

• 34 How Are Dignity and Humiliation Relevant in Our Lives, Our Societies, and for the United Nations?
Brown bag lunch, The UN Interagency Framework Team for Preventive Action, 1 United Nations Plaza (DC-1), 20th Floor Conference Room, 26 November 26, 2013, 1pm – 2.30 pm.
See here a video recording that is registered in YouTube as "unlisted," which means it is not publicly available. Please note that prior to the video-recording, Gay Rosenblum-Kumar explained Evelin's global life design, a life design that provides a perspective similar to an astronaut's gaze on the Blue Planet from space. Courtney E. Furlong did the video recording. See still pictures here.
• Abstract: What is dignity? Dignity is extremely difficult to conceptualize, as is its absence. All around the world, terms such as dignity and respect are used by an increasing number of people who are becoming aware of their rights. Questions are being asked, such as: "What does dignity mean for individuals and communities especially in relation to violent conflict and recovery from conflict? When dignity is not upheld, how is the damage incurred characterized in terms of humiliation of groups or individuals? Is there a causality and relationship between humiliation and violent conflict? What is required for a society to ameliorate situations that undermine dignity, to repair damage done, and to develop and maintain "sustainable dignity" for all people? What should the United Nations do to ensure that its activities and practices protect and promote dignity?
The Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network is a global transdisciplinary fellowship of concerned academics, practitioners, activists, artists, and others, who collaborate in a spirit of mutual support to understand the complex dynamics of dignity and its violation, through disrespect and humiliation (humiliationstudies.org). This network wishes to stimulate systemic change - globally and locally - to open space for mutual respect and esteem to take root and grow, thus ending humiliating practices and breaking cycles of humiliation throughout the world. The HumanDHS movement has currently around 1,000 members from all continents and the website (humiliationstudies.org) is accessed by 20,000-40,000 people annually from more than 180 countries since its inception in 2003. In 2011, the World Dignity University initiative (worldignityuniversity.org) and the publishing house Dignity Press (dignitypress.org) were launched and have published many books since 2012. The network organizes two conferences per year, one at a different global location each year (Paris, Berlin, Costa Rica, China, Norway, Hawai'i, Istanbul, New Zealand, and South Africa). The other conference takes place each December at Columbia University, New York entitled 'Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict', with Morton Deutsch as honorary convener. More than 20 conferences have been held since 2003.
About the presenter: Evelin Lindner is the founding president of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS, www.humiliationstudies.org) and a cofounder of the World Dignity University initiative (www.worlddignity.org), which includes Dignity Press and World Dignity University Press (www.dignitypress.org). Dr. Lindner has a dual education as a Medical Doctor and a Psychologist, with two Ph.D.s. (Dr. med. and Dr. psychol.). She is a research fellow at the University of Oslo since 1997, affiliated with Columbia University since 2001 with the Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict, and Complexity, and with the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme in Paris since 2003. Her first book Making Enemies: Humiliation and International Conflict was honored as "Outstanding Academic Title" by the journal Choice for 2007 in the USA. She published her second book in 2009 on Emotion and Conflict. Her third book on Gender, Humiliation, and Global Security was published in 2010 with a Foreword by Desmond Tutu, is being highly recommended by Choice. Her fourth book, published in 2012 by World Dignity University Press, is titled A Dignity Economy. She has received several awards, among them the "Prisoner's Testament" Peace Award in 2009.

• 35 Verdighet eller ydmykelse? (UiO Podcast utgave | YouTube utgaven av samtalen på slutten)
Årlig foredrag ved Psykologisk institutt ved Universitetet i Oslo, 22. januar 2014, 10.00-12.00, Aud 3, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3 A, 0373 Oslo, Norway. See bilder. Foredraget er del av PSYC3203 - Anvendt sosialpsykologi. Se flere av Evelins foredrag ved www.sv.uio.no/tjenester/kunnskap/podkast/index.html (søk etter "Lindner"). Oversikt ov er emnene (pensum, tider, eksamen etc.): liste over alle emnene, semester oversikt, oversikt over profesjonsstudiet i psykologi.
Sammendrag: Fra psyc3203 emnebeskrivelsen på web: Sosialpsykologi handler om kartlegging av ulike gruppers problemer i en organisasjon eller et lokalmiljø, kanskje med sikte på å utvikle tiltak for å forebygge problemer. Sentrale begreper er makt, sosial støtte og påvirkning, deskriptive og injunktive normer, konformitet og lydighet, sosial identitet, stigma og fordomsreduksjon, selvregulering, resultat- og mestringsforventninger, attribusjon, holdningsendring og implementeringsintensjoner, prediksjon og forebygging, for eksempel knyttet til helserelatert atferd, mobbing, immigrasjon og flerkulturelle forhold. Videreutvikling av kritisk vitenskapelig tenkning står sentralt i sosialpsykologi.
Onsdagens foredrag fremhever sosialpsykologi som privilegert felt. Sosialpsykologi befinner seg i midten av mikro og makro nivået og kan dermed knytte sammen, lære av, og inspirere alt fra forskning på mikrostrukturer i biologi til makrostrukturer i statsvitenskap. Sosialpsykologi får en mer relevant plass i dagens utvikling fra autoritær undertrykkelse til likeverdig kommunikasjon og atferd, og fra utpressing av sosiale og økologiske ressurser til å gi næring til bærekraftige samfunn. Alle overfor nevnte begreper går inn i denne analysen.
Foredraget belyser særlig begrepene verdighet og ydmykelse og hvordan betydningen av disse begrepene har forandret seg i løpet av de siste generasjoner. Denne endringen er relevant for faget og for det enkelte individ.

• 36 Evelin Lindner's 'Sunflower Identity' Conceptualisation and Global Living
Contribution to the 'Communication and Dignity,' Thematic Network Meeting, convened by Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Oslo, Norway, together with 'Impuls' - Student Journal of Psychology at the University of Oslo and Educationforpeace-dot-com, at the University of Oslo, Norway, 23rd - 24th January 2014. See the invitation and programme in English. We thank Randi Gunhildstad for documenting this sequence with her mobile phone on 23rd January 2014.
See also "Living Globally: Global Citizenship of Care as Personal Practice," the long version of Lindner's contribution to the anthology Norwegian Citizen - Global Citizen, 2013.

• 37 The Dignilogue Approach (Dignity + Dialogue)
Contribution to the 'Communication and Dignity,' Thematic Network Meeting, convened by Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in Oslo, Norway, together with 'Impuls' - Student Journal of Psychology at the University of Oslo and Educationforpeace-dot-com, at the University of Oslo, Norway, 23rd - 24th January 2014. See the invitation and programme in English. We thank Randi Gunhildstad for documenting this sequence with our video camera on 23rd January 2014.
The Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network has developed the Dignilogue approach (dignity + dialogue) over the years, taking the inspiration from the Open Space Technology by Harrison Owen, who is also a member of the HumanDHS Global Advisory Board. We thank Randi Gunhildstad for documenting this sequence with our video camera on 23rd January 2014.

• 38 What is Urban Dignity? How Do We Achieve It?
12th Urban Culture Forum, 'Arts and Social Outreach - Designs for Urban Dignity' by The Urban Research Plaza, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, room 105 of the Maha-Chulalongkorn Building
Convened by Kjell Skyllstad,3rd - 4th March 2014. Due to technical issues, this presentation could not be given in its full length. Deeyah Khan kindly did the recording. Please note that this video is unedited.
Abstract: Unity in diversity is at the center of urban dignity. It means that people of all classes and colors intermingle in a spirit of mutual care and respect. Traditionally, throughout the past millennia, uniformity in division has been practised almost everywhere on the planet: to strengthen their competitive advantage over enemy out-groups, in-groups maintained a strictly unequal domination of higher beings over lesser beings. Unity in diversity is a more complex experience because it requires the readiness and ability to consider everybody else as equal in dignity, and it calls for the skills to actually enter into dialogue with equals. As long as such a culture is not yet established, unity in diversity has the potential to trigger uneasiness, including feelings of humiliation, and can lead to attempts to cleanse and exclude diversity so as to return to the more familiar and less complex experience of uniformity in division. Urban contexts are prime experimental laboratories for this transition. For urban dignity to flourish and social and ecological sustainability to emerge, interdisciplinary debate and sharing needs to overcome the traditional practise of domination over people and over nature. Urban dignity flourishes when the city is regarded in terms of a family that collaborates in mutual communal sharing and stewardship of their environment, while urban dignity collapses when priority is given to clambering for power and status, be it through overt oppression or cloaked as economic necessities. Artists have a central role in creating conditions for social interactions of dignity rather than humiliation. One example was given by Oslo citizens when they reacted to the 22 July 2011 terror attacks in Norway by gathering in front of the courthouse singing 'The Rainbow People'. Music unites.

• 39 Introduction by Kjell Skyllstad and Evelin Lindner, and Presentation of Participants
The 23rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 'Returning Dignity', took place in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 8 - 12th March 2014. On Day One, 8th March 2014, Kjell Skyllstad and Evelin Lindner opened the conference. The video was recorded by a professional team invited by Chiang Mai University.

• 40 At the Learning Center of the Lahu Village Suan Lahu in Northern Thailand
The 23rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 'Returning Dignity', took place in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 8 - 12th March 2014. On Day Three and Four, on 10th and 11th March 2014, the participants of the conference had the great privilege of being welcomed to Suan Lahu, a Lahu village in Northern Thailand, by Carina zur Strassen. The video was kindly recorded by Mark Petz on 10th March 2014. It shows Evelin Lindner briefly explaining the work of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network.
Carina zur Strassen later drew our attention to the film Landfill Harmonic - An Orchestra for Kids with Instruments Made from Trash (La armonía del vertedero - Orquesta de Instrumentos Reciclados de Cateura), published on 29 Dec 2012.

• 41 At the Learning Center, Interview with Carina zur Strassen and Evelin Lindner
The 23rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 'Returning Dignity', took place in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 8 - 12th March 2014. On Day Three and Four, on 10th and 11th March 2014, the participants of the conference had the great privilege of being welcomed to Suan Lahu, a Lahu village in Northern Thailand, by Carina zur Strassen. This conversation between Carina zur Strassen and Evelin Lindner was kindly recorded by Donna Fujimotoon 10th March 2014.

• 42 Global Dignity
The 23rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 'Returning Dignity', took place in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 8 - 12th March 2014. On Day Five of the conference, on 12th March 2014, Evelin Lindner gave a brief overview over her work on global dignity. The video was kindly recorded by Donna Fujimoto.

• 43 Cambodia: Siem Reap's Killing Fields' Memorial
On 28th March 2014, Evelin Lindner visit the Killings Fields of Siem Reap. Wat Thmey is home to Siem Reap's Killing Fields' memorial. Evelin is horrified to observe that killings fields are now a tourist attraction, the one in Phnom Penh being hailed as 'the best one'... by 'cool' youngsters catering to tourists... The video was recorded by Evelin. Please note that it is not professionally done and that it is unedited.
See this article, titled 'Wat Thmey', in Siem Reap Post, 15 Aug 2013: Wat Thmey (or Wat Thmei) is located about 3 km from the centre of Siem Reap along the exit road from Angkor. If you go past the back of the Jayavaraman VII hospital heading out of town, it's on the left. Most tuk tuk drivers and tour guides know it. It is a small active Pagoda, with a not-very-inspiring statue of Buddha. The hall it's in is quite nicely decorated and you could spend a good couple of minutes there looking around. Outside there are the homes for the monks, and a teaching hall, as well as a small gift shop selling tourist tack.
So far so ordinary. There's nothing here to make you stay more than a few minutes. However at the side of the Pagoda, is a small, rather gruesome building. Wat Thmey is home to Siem Reap's Killing Fields' memorial.
Anyone who comes to Cambodia and knows anything about it's past, will know that since the 1400s it has been a troubled country. First the Thais sacked Angkor in 1432. Then in 1863, at the request of the King in Exile, the French took over. In the 1960s and 70s, Cambodia was subject to violent protests, and civil war. Finally in 1975, the Khmer Rouge took power. They renamed the country Democratic Kampuchea and started clearing people from towns. In a matter of hours, the entire population of Phnom Penh was ordered to leave. Many people died on the road. Everywhere people were put to work. People were killed for the slightest reason – for being too clever, for refusing to work. wat-thmey(10)Many more died through starvation, illness and the brutality that followed. Most were buried in mass graves, or simply thrown into hastily dug trenches. It is estimated that 2,000,000 people were killed – about a third of the population at the time.The regime was largely ousted in 1979 but Cambodia was in a state of limbo and run by the Vietnamese until 1993 when the King was restored and power returned to an elected government. Cambodia as a modern country is only 20 years old. No wonder people look to the future, even though their greatest monuments are from the past.
Pol Pot had great ideals, great motives, but the plan went awry. In Phnom Penh there are reminders of this at Chao Ponhea Yat High School (the notorious Tuol Sleng or S21 prison) and the Killing Fields. In Siem Reap, the memorial is a small building at Wat Thmey with glass windows housing the skulls and bones of some of those who perished. There are also a couple of boards with fading photos showing life in the dark days. It doesn't take long to go round. 15 minutes at most on the way back from Angkor. It's part of the past that many people would like to forget. But, like war memorials in Western Countries, it serves as a warning to future generations.
If you want to know a little about Siem Reap's most recent past, take along an older tour guide. Let him tell you his story, and you too can shudder at the brutality and futility of it all.

• 44 Angkor, Cambodia: Tuk-tuk Driver Lee Speaking
On 28th March 2014, Evelin Lindner asks Lee, her Tuk-tuk driver-friend to bring her to Siem Reap's Killing Fields' Memorial. His full name is Boun Sengny. She invites him to introduce himself. Later she would have the honour of being invited to meet his family at their home. youtu.be/AROR4zEgHxg The video was recorded by Evelin Lindner. Please note that it is not professionally done and that it is unedited.

• 45 Angkor, Cambodia: Tuk-tuk Journey from Siem Reap to Angkor Wat
On 28th March 2014, Evelin Lindner makes her way from Siem Reap to Angkor Wat with Lee, her Tuk-tuk driver-friend. Later she would have the honour of being invited to meet his family at their home. As many forecast, in 10 years time, Cambodia may be as destroyed as Thailand. Big money will have taken over and pushed out local communities. Therefore, Evelin always makes an effort to document everything, even seemingly profane details (because they may no longer be part of daily life in ten years time), even if done as unprofessionally as here. She remembers her time in 1981 in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Burma, and her time in 1983 in China, and she regrets not having documented daily life then more. The video was recorded by Evelin. Please note that it is not professionally done and that it is unedited.
See also Das Mysterium von Angkor, Film von Andreas Sawall (Terra X ZDF/Arte/ZDF enterprises).

• 46 Angkor Wat, Cambodia
On 28th March 2014, Evelin Lindner makes her way from Siem Reap to Angkor Wat with Lee, her Tuk-tuk driver-friend. Later she would have the honour of being invited to meet his family at their home. As many forecast, in 10 years time, Cambodia may be as destroyed as Thailand. Big money will have taken over and pushed out local communities. Therefore, Evelin always makes an effort to document everything, even seemingly profane details (because they may no longer be part of daily life in ten years time), even if done as unprofessionally as here. She remembers her time in 1981 in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Burma, and her time in 1983 in China, and she regrets not having documented daily life then more. The video was recorded by Evelin. Please note that it is not professionally done and that it is unedited.

• 47 Angkor, Cambodia: To Bayon Khmer Temple and Then Back to Siem Reap
On 28th March 2014, Evelin Lindner makes her way to the Bayon Temple at Angkor with Lee, her Tuk-tuk driver-friend. Later she would have the honour of being invited to meet his family at their home. As many forecast, in 10 years time, Cambodia may be as destroyed as Thailand. Big money will have taken over and pushed out local communities. Therefore, Evelin always makes an effort to document everything, even seemingly profane details (because they may no longer be part of daily life in ten years time), even if done as unprofessionally as here. She remembers her time in 1981 in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Burma, and her time in 1983 in China, and she regrets not having documented daily life then more. The video was recorded by Evelin. Please note that it is not professionally done and that it is unedited.

• 48 Angkor, Cambodia: Asia and the Loss of Its Silk - Another Sad Confirmation
On 28th March 2014, Evelin Lindner notices the Asia Craft Centre on the Road to Angkor Wat in Cambodia. She stops and admires the women making silk at the entrance. When she enters, she learns that the shop is owned by a group of Kashmiri families, who have shops all over Asia. Once again, she receives the sad confirmation that silk is being replaced by cheap mass-produced synthetic fabric from China and is now too expensive to produce. Thai silk is no longer made, she is told. Jim Thompson, in Thailand, now no longer sells silk made in Thailand, but made in China. The last rest of authentic silk production is in Kashmir... Please note that it is not professionally done and that it is unedited. On 30th March 2014, Evelin will make another attempt to inquire about silk and where it still may be produced.
Everywhere on the globe, Evelin observes a dramatic decay of the quality of products or the disappearance of products that were still ubiquitous a few years ago. She lived in Thailand in 1981 and asks: 'Where has the Thai silk gone that was sold at every corner? Thai silk is just one example. Why am I surrounded by mass produced quasi-waste instead, stuff that nobody really needs and that is poisoned by a variety of toxins? Why do we, the human family, sacrifice the recourses of our planet for such an absurdity?' Linda Harling, her husband, and Evelin have discussed this also with Nebil Basmaci, on 30th April 2010, at the 2010 Dignity Conference in Istanbul, when they attempted to enjoy the Covered Bazaar and unexpectedly had a very special conversation on the dignity - or rather the lack of dignity - in contemporary economic arrangements.

• 49 Angkor, Cambodia: The Streets of Siem Reap
On 29th March 2014, Evelin Lindner documents the streets of Siem Reap on her way to the War Museum. As many forecast, in 10 years time, Cambodia may be as destroyed as Thailand. Big money will have taken over and pushed out local communities. Therefore, Evelin always makes an effort to document everything, even seemingly profane details (because they may no longer be part of daily life in ten years time), even if done as unprofessionally as here. She remembers her time in 1981 in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Burma, and her time in 1983 in China, and she regrets not having documented daily life then more. The video was recorded by Evelin. Please note that it is not professionally done and that it is unedited.

• 50 Angkor, Cambodia: Testimony of Sinat, Genocide Survivor, Disabled War Veteran, and Landmine Victim, at the War Museum Cambodia
On 29th March 2014, Evelin Lindner speaks with Sinat, 48, genocide survivor, disabled war veteran, and landmine victim, at the War Museum Cambodia in Siem Reap is the only war museum in Cambodia. The museum has a sad collection of arms. Evelin recorded this video. Please note that it is not professionally done and that it is unedited.

• 51 Angkor, Cambodia: Ta Prohm Khmer Temple
On 29th March 2014, Evelin Lindner visits Ta Prohm, which is the modern name of the temple at Angkor, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia, built in the Bayon style largely in the late 12th and early 13th centuries and originally called Rajavihara (in Khmer: រាជវិហារ). Located approximately one kilometre east of Angkor Thom and on the southern edge of the East Baray, it was founded by the Khmer King Jayavarman VII as a Mahayana Buddhist monastery and university. Evelin recorded this video. Please note that it is not professionally done and that it is unedited.

• 52 Angkor, Cambodia: Dance Performance
On 29th March 2014, Evelin Lindner recorded this video of a dance performance. Please note that this video is not professionally done and it is unedited. Evelin wonders if this kind of performance will still be as relatively authentic in ten years time, or if it will have become 'Westernised' and hyped for the sake of attracting tourists...

• 53 Angkor, Cambodia: The Home of Tuk-tuk Driver Lee in Siem Reap
On 30th March 2014, Evelin has the great honour to be invited to the home of Boun Sengny, also called Lee, who was her caring guide throughout her time in Siem Reap and Angkor. He lives in a room that he rents from the owner of a wooden construction. One can rent a small room for 15 American dollars and somewhat larger ones for 25 dollars. Lee pays 25 American dollars per month for the room he lives in, plus electricity. It is one single room, and Lee lives there together with his wife and their two daughters. His wife offers laundry services; she washes everything per hand. Lee is proud of sending his daughter to school. His dream is to be able to buy his own tuk-tuk so as to be able to earn more money to support his family. See an earlier video, from 28th March 2014, where Lee introduced himself. Evelin recorded this video. Please note that it is not professionally done and that it is unedited.
Evelin's reflections: 'When I see the conditions in which Lee and his family are living, I am touched by the communal life that I see, and the serenity and dignity of the people. Remembering the Karen village Ban Nong Thao in Northern Thailand (and my own childhood in a similar setting), I imagine that Lee, and all those who flock to Siem Reap to earn a higher income, may hail from similar tightly knit communities. Traditional community life is disrupted here in Siem Reap, yet, it is also continuing, at least partly, since the design of the rooms around a small area of open land makes some kind of village-like communal living possible. What will happen when Lee's daughter, after great sacrifices from her parents, will have received the higher education they so much wish for her? She will move into a home with more physical amenities, perhaps. Yet, this house will have a wall around it and she will be alone in there. She will lose her community context even more than now. No wonder, that Lee reports that drinking and domestic violence are on the rise also in Cambodia. The promise of a 'better life' through the Coca Cola signs I see everywhere, by beer advertisement on television, what if the price will be too high? What if it increases the ubiquitous plastic waste that pollutes every corner already now, and causes the intoxication of its people and their social and psychological health?'

• 54 Angkor, Cambodia: Prasat Kravan Temple
On 30th March 2014, Evelin Lindner makes her way from Siem Reap to the Prasat Kravan Temple, together with Lee, her Tuk-tuk driver-friend. She had the honour of being invited to meet his family at their home earlier the same day. As many forecast, in 10 years time, Cambodia may be as destroyed as Thailand. Big money will have taken over and pushed out local communities. Therefore, Evelin always makes an effort to document everything, even seemingly profane details (because they may no longer be part of daily life in ten years time), even if done as unprofessionally as here. She remembers her time in 1981 in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Burma, and her time in 1983 in China, and she regrets not having documented daily life then more. The video was recorded by Evelin. Please note that it is not professionally done and that it is unedited.

•55 Angkor, Cambodia: Asia and the Loss of Its Silk - Takeo
On 28th March 2014, Evelin Lindner noticed the Asia Craft Centre on the Road to Angkor Wat. She stopped and admired the women making silk at the entrance. When she entered, she learned that the shop was owned by a group of Kashmiri families, who have shops all over Asia. Once again, she received the sad confirmation that silk is being replaced by cheap mass-produced synthetic fabric from China and is now too expensive to produce. Thai silk is no longer made, she was told. Jim Thompson, in Thailand, now no longer sells silk made in Thailand, but made in China. The last rest of authentic silk production is in Kashmir, she learned...
On 30th March 2014, Evelin makes another attempt to inquire about silk and whether it is still being produced, and if yes, where. She learns that Takeo in Cambodia was the largest silk producer in the past according a survey of the main silk producers located in Som Rong district, Barty district, Prey Karbas and Mongkol Borey district. On www.tpd.gov.kh one reads 'that the four main silk producing districts developed very fast in recent years under technical support from developing partners. Silk producers in 11 villages of Barty and Somrong district have formed the Takeo Silk Producer Community in order to facilitate technical assistance from various institutions. Production: 2,200 looms in four main districts, 90% of production is Samputh Hole, 10% of production are scarf and plain silks'. This video was recorded by Evelin. Please note that it is not professionally done and that it is unedited.
Everywhere on the globe, Evelin observes a dramatic decay of the quality of products or the disappearance of products that were still ubiquitous a few years ago. She lived in Thailand in 1981 and asks: 'Where has the Thai silk gone that was sold at every corner? Thai silk is just one example. Why am I surrounded by mass produced quasi-waste instead, stuff that nobody really needs and that is poisoned by a variety of toxins? Why do we, the human family, sacrifice the recourses of our planet for such an absurdity?' Linda Hartling, her husband, and Evelin have discussed this also with Nebil Basmaci, on 30th April 2010, at the 2010 Dignity Conference in Istanbul, when they attempted to enjoy the Covered Bazaar and unexpectedly had a very special conversation on the dignity - or rather the lack of dignity - in contemporary economic arrangements.

• 56 Dignity, Humiliation, and Terrorism: How to Think Globally
Evelin Lindner spoke about dignity, humiliation, and terrorism, and how to think globally in the context of the Monday lunch series (mandagslunsj) at the Norwegian Centre for Human Rights / Norsk senter for menneskerettigheter, University of Oslo / Universitetet i Oslo, Cort Adelers gate 30, 0162 Oslo, Norway, Seminarrom Asbjørn Eide, on 2nd June 2014. Evelin was introduced by Inga Bostad. After her talk, Kjell Skyllstad received the Beacon of Dignity Award for his life-long visionary work for dignity, see the ceremony here.
Evelin makes the point that, in her view, at present, the breeding ground for terrorism increases, as do the opportunities for catastrophic impact, and if terrorism receives attention, it often is for the wrong reasons and with counter-productive interventions. She observes, all around the world, how global terror (which is more universal than single state terror) is perpetrated by a global government/corporate nexus using partnership rhetoric to covertly advance the dominator model of society (to use Riane Eisler's terminology). Dignity rhetoric is used to cover a mindset of honour (to use Evelin Lindner's terminology). In this context, the misuse of the term terrorism for any dissent increases and further hollows out social and ecological health and resources for the benefit of more domination. It also increases the likelihood for those to rise up who wish to bomb the world back into an overt dominator model. Evelin advocates to replace the conceptualisations of Socialism/Capitalism with Dignity-ism or Dignism: A world where every newborn finds space and is nurtured to unfold their highest and best, embedded in a social context of loving appreciation and connection. A world, where the carrying capacity of the planet guides the ways in which everybody's basic needs are met, a world, where we are united in respecting human dignity and celebrating diversity, where we prevent unity from being perverted into oppressive uniformity, and keep diversity from sliding into hostile division.

• 57 Brøtsøy: Gerdelin Bodvin's Wonderful World, 3rd June 2014
Evelin Lindner har det store privilegium av å være hilst velkommen av Gerdelin Bodvin i hennes vidunderlige hjem på Brøtsøy i juni, juli og august 2014. Denne videoen lagde hun den 3. juni.
Evelin Lindner has the great privilege of being welcomed by Gerdelin Bodvin into her amazing home on Brøtsøy in June, July, and August 2014. She recorded these impressions early in the morning on 3rd June, see also some still pictures. After taking the pictures, she wrote down some reflections: "I notice how happy it makes me to be surrounded by an environment that has been created by the effort and the love of human beings, rather than machines. I become ever more aware of the fact that machine-made surroundings impoverish my inner soul. Here, I am surrounded by the evidence of myriad thoughts of people who made something by hand, thoughts clearly manifested in the objects and environments they created. I feel part of a community of people who all contributed to making this place look as it looks now, rather than a designer having created a prototype that then was multiplied by machines and sold for profit. Here the spirit of community become palpable, or what Alen Page Fiske would call 'communal sharing', rather than what he would call 'market pricing'. Of course, I do understand that certain objects are better produced by machines, yet, I would vote for minimising them to where they are truly functional, rather than letting them 'pollute' the world for the sake of profit maximisation for a few elites."

• 58 Brøtsøy: Path to the Fjord, 10th June 2014
Evelin Lindner har det store privilegium av å være hilst velkommen av Gerdelin Bodvin i hennes vidunderlige hjem på Brøtsøy i juni, juli og august 2014. Denne videoen lagde Evelin den 10. juni om ettermiddagen for å vise hvilken vei hun tar hver morgen når hun svømmer fram og tilbake til øya på den andre siden.
Evelin Lindner has the great privilege of being welcomed by Gerdelin Bodvin into her amazing home on Brøtsøy in June, July, and August 2014. She recorded these impressions in the afternoon of 10th June to document the path to the fjord, where she swims every morning to the island on the other side.
See also some still pictures.

• 59 En hyllest til Ubuntu - A Tribute to Ubuntu: Evelins bursdag/birthday 2014
Den 23. juni 2014, ved sammenkomsten for hennes 60-årsdag, hadde Evelin det store privilegium av å være omgitt av vår verdighetsfamilie og kunne takke dem for deres fantastiske støtte og nærvær! Festen var en hyllest til 'Ubuntu'. Ubuntu betyr 'Jeg er på grunn av DEG! Vi er på grunn av HVERANDRE!' Takk, kjære Finn, for at du minnet oss om Ubuntu! Her er stemmen til Desmond Tutu som forklarer Ubuntu! Takk, kjære Linda, for å ha spilt inn Desmond Tutus ord!
Denne videoen viser hele festen klippet sammen av Evelin i full fart og er ca. 40 minutter lang: en stor takk til alle som bidro! Filmen er ikke profesjonelt laget - beklager at du må tilpasse lydstyrken etter behov... I den første versonen inkluderte jeg sangene Zourouni og Hado men tok de ut i den endelige versjonen fordi jeg ikke greide å takle copy right reglene.
On the 23rd June 2014, at the gathering for Evelin's 60th birthday, she had the great privilege of being surrounded by our dignity family and could thank them for their amazing support and presence! The celebration was a tribute to 'Uuntu'. Ubuntu means 'I am because of YOU! We are because of EACH OTHER!' Thank you, dear Finn, for reminding us of Ubuntu!
Listen to Desmond Tutu explaining Ubuntu!
Thank you, dear Linda, for having recorded Desmond Tutu's words!
This is the whole celebration cut together by Evelin. Please be aware that this is unfortunately not at all professionally done - sorry that you have to adjust the volume as needed. The video is ca. 40 minutes long.
Alle var kjærlig invitert til å gi meg en bursdags klem ved Norsk Folkemuseum på Bygdøy i Oslo på ettermiddagen av Sankthansaften, se den opprinnelige invitasjonen.
Everyone was lovingly invited to give me a birthday hug at the Norwegian Museum of Cultural History on Bygdøy in Oslo on the afternoon of the summer solstice; see the original invitation.
Gerdelin Bodvin er min kjære vert for min skrive retrett for juni, juli og august i hennes vakre hjem på Brøtsøy. Gerdelin og jeg, vi startet tidlig om morgen fra Tjøme for å være i Oslo i tide til feiringen!
Gerdelin Bodvin is my dear host for my writing retreat for June, July, and August, in her lovely home at the Oslofjord on Brøtsøy, Tjøme, Norway. Gerdelin and I, we started early from Tjøme to be in Oslo in time for the celebration!
Bilder:
• Please click on the picture at the top or here to see more photos taken by Elisabeth Kristiansen
• Please click on the picture in the third row or here to see more photos taken by Esben Østbye
• Please click on the picture in the second row or here to see more photos taken by Trine Eklund
• Please click on the picture at the bottom or here to see more photos taken by Torstein with Evelin's camera
Videoer:
Vennligst se videoene Lasse og Elisabeth har laget, takk til dere, kjære dere begge to!
Alle videoer er nå lagt ut som 'unlisted' på YouTube som betyr at de er mer private, de er ikke offentlige. La meg vite om jeg har deres tillatelse! Takk!
Please see the videos Lasse and Elisabeth created, thank you, dear both of you!!! All videos are posted as 'unlisted' on YouTube, meaning that they are more private, they are not public. Let me know if I have your permission!
Her kommer enkelt snuttene:
• 59.1 En liten smakebit av Sankthansaften på Folkemuseet: Barnebryllup! Tatt opp av Evelin.
• 59.2 Gerdelin Bodvin og Jan Smedslund: Gerdelin Bodvin åpner festen og deretter deler Jan Smedslund dypt berørende tanker! Takk kjære Mette for opptaket!
• 59.3 Margrethe Tingstad og hennes nydelige musikk gave! I denne videoen deler Margrethe Tingstad sine tanker og bringer en vidunderlig musikk gave. Takk, kjære Margrethe for at du kom med din sønn og hans fantastiske medspillere! Det var en utrolig nytelse! Og takk kjære Lasse for opptaket!
• 59.4 Paal Sandø og hans partner spiller teater! Utrolig fint! Takk kjære Lasse for opptaket!
• 59.5 Trine Eklund og Kjell SkyllstadTrine Eklund og Kjell Skyllstad deler viktige tanker som berører dypt! Takk kjære Lasse for opptaket!
• 59.6 Guri Lorentzen Østbyes enestående første sang! I denne videoen synger Guri Lorentzen Østbye en vidunderlig sang til Evelin som er dypt berørt og takknemlig! Takk kjære Lasse for opptaket!
• 59.7 Finn Tschudi snakker om ydmyk stolthet. I denne videoen kaller Finn Tschudi på oss alle å gi næring til ydmyk stolthet snarere enn arrogant stolthet. Dessverre var batteriet tomt på slutten, beklager! Takk kjære Lasse for opptaket!
• 59.8 Mai-Bente Bonnevie sier nydelige ord! I denne videoen sier Mai-Bente Bonnevie nydelige ord som berører dypt! Hun snakker om Babettes gæstebud! Takk kjære Elisabeth for opptaket!
• 59.9 Randi Gunhildstad synger! I denne videoen overbringer Randi Gunhildstad en vidunderlig sangsgave! Du har løftet oss opp på det skjønneste, kjære Randi! Takk kjære Elisabeth for opptaket!
• 59.10 Guri Lorentzen Østbyes dypt berørende strupesang! I denne videoen synger Guri Lorentzen Østbye hennes vidunderlige strupesang til Evelin som er dypt berørt og takknemlig! Takk kjære Elisabeth for opptaket!
• 59.11 Ellinor Halle samlet oss! Denne videoen viser hvordan Ellinor Halle samlet oss alle på slutten av festen! Takk, takk, takk, kjære Ellinor! Og takk kjære Elisabeth for opptaket!
• Birthday greetings from Linda Hartling, Michael Britton and Uli Spalthoff
Happy birthday to you!
Your apprenticeship is through!
Another 60 years of connecting, respecting, reflecting,
Another 60 years of relating, co-creating, collaborating,
Another 60 years of bringing dignity to the world we see,
Is our birthday wish for you!
• Francisco Gomes de Matos, a peace linguist, Co-founder, The World Dignity University initiative, together with his wife Helen, sent these rhymed reflections on 8th May 2014:
On Evelin's birthday: A wish for every day
The day Evelin was born, a deeply humanizing concept was generated
By her living as a global citizen, DIGNITY is being inspiringly demonstrated
She believes that by our
sharing the Earth dignifyingly Humankind's character-conduct-communication will be elevated
and by our implementing the goals of the World Dignity University initiative people from East and West as DIGNIFIERS will be educated
In unison, as members of the Dignity community Evelin farsightedly founded
in all of our languages, let's joyfully say
From May 13th 2014, let's commit to making every day a LET's LIVE IN DIGNITY day

• 60 Die heutige Welt aus der Sicht eines Realisten, Erfahrungen aus Thailand
Dieses Video wurde von Evelin Frerk in Berlin am 31. August 2014 aufgenommen. Siehe auch Global Dignity: What Is It? How Do We Achieve It? im Journal of Urban Culture Research, Volume 8, 2014, Arts and Social Outreach – Designs for Urban Dignity, Faculty of Fine and Applied Arts, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand. This paper brings together Evelin Lindner's thoughts about global dignity with the experiences and insights she gathered in Thailand in March and April 2014.

• 61 A Global Dignilogue with Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner, December 4, 2014 (Pdf | Video)
Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner engage in a Dignilogue (Dignity + Dialogue), on the morning of December 4, 2014, at the 11th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, which took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 4-5, 2014. Linda Hartling is the Director of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network and Evelin Lindner its Founding President. We thank Christine de Michele so very much for the video-taping!

• 62 Evelin Lindner Receives the HumanDHS Half Lifetime Award, December 5, 2014
Evelin Lindner, Founding President of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network, receives the Half Lifetime Award, on December 5, 2014, at the 11th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, which took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 4 - 5, 2014. We thank Christine de Michele for the video-taping!

• 63 CEdR/Academic: Dr. Lindner MD, Themed World Dignity University, Global Education - Gift Economy
Please see the video interview Neal Gupta conducted with Evelin Lindner on December 5, 2014, at the 11th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, which took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 4 - 5, 2014: CEdR/academic: Culture Education Discussion Research. Cloud and Designed Learning: Dr. Lindner MD, themed World Dignity University, global education, gift economy, forming a no cost education network, zero budget movement, understanding social equality, published on December 7, 2014.

• 64 Hayal Köksal and Evelin Lindner Post-Workshop, December 7, 2014
Hayal Köksal and Evelin Lindner, Founding President of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network, speak to each other on December 7, 2014, after the 11th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, which took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 4 - 5, 2014. We use Hayal's cell phone to video-tape this brief conversation in the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

• 65 Hva har kultur- og samfunnspsykologi med verdighet å gjøre?, 11th February, 2015 (UiO Podcast av foredraget og samtalen på slutten | YouTube utgave av samtalen)
Gjesteforelesning / guest lecture, Psykologisk institutt / Department of Psychology, Universitetet i Oslo, Norway, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3A, 0373 Oslo, Norge, auditorium 1, 11. februar 2015, 13.15-15.00. Warm thanks go to Ole Jacob Madsen for the invitation and to Per Ole Bjørnstad for the video-taping.
This lecture is part of an annual series hosted by the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo, Norway (until 2014 as part of PSYC3203 - Anvendt sosialpsykologi; see the video site of the Faculty of Social Science at the University of Oslo). Please see a long description here.

• 66 Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, 16th February 2015
Monday lunch / Mandagslunsj with Evelin Lindner, introduction / åpningsinnlegg Inga Bostad, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights / Norsk senter for menneskerettigheter, University of Oslo / Universitetet i Oslo, Cort Adelers gate 30, 0162 Oslo, Norway, Seminarrom Asbjørn Eide, 16th February 2015, 12:00 - 13:00, see announcement. Warm thanks go to Rachel Aspögård for video-taping the talk.

• 67 Evelin Lindner Shares Appreciative Greetings, 5th June 2015
The 25th Annual Conference of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network took place in Kigali, Rwanda, from 2nd - 5th June 2015. On the last day of the conference on 5th June 2015, Evelin Lindner shared appreciative greetings. The videos of this day were kindly recorded by Mark Robert Massalu Itallange and Francis Nuwagaba.

• 68 Regaining Dignity: A Dignity Renaissance, 30th June 2015
Presentation prepared for the 4th June, 2015, at the 25th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, which took place in Kigali, Rwanda, 2nd - 5th June 2015, given in Kigali on 30th June 2015, see the PowerPoint video created on 30th June.

• 69 Von Demütigung zu Terror und Krieg: Erniedrigung kann zu Gewalt führen, kann sie auch zu Liebe führen?, 11. Oktober 2015
Von Demütigung zu Terror und Krieg: Erniedrigung kann zu Gewalt führen, kann sie auch zu Liebe führen?
2015 Symposium "Gehirne zwischen Liebe und Krieg - Menschlichkeit in Zeiten der Neurowissenschaften", gemeinnützige Turm der Sinne / Tower of the Senses GmbH, Nürnberg, Germany. Siehe auch turmdersinne's blog, Evelin's bio, und Nürnberger Nachrichten, 24. September 2015.

• 70 A Global Dignilogue with Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner, Honoring the Message of Alfred Nobel and Bertha von Suttner, December 3, 2015 (Link to Nobel Peace Prize nomination page | Video | Powerpoint | see also Pdf 2014)
Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner engage in a Dignilogue (Dignity + Dialogue), on the morning of December 3, 2015, at the 12th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, which took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 3 - 4, 2015. Linda Hartling is the Director of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network. Evelin Lindner is the founding president of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network and she explains the background of, and the intentions behind the Nobel Peace Prize. See also her reflections on her 2015 nomination, and meet the inspirer of the prize, Bertha von Suttner. We very much thank Gabriela Saab for the video-taping!

• 71 Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner in Dignilogue on the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize Nomination of Our Dignity Work, December 3, 2015 (Link to Nobel Peace Prize nomination page | Video | Powerpoint | see also Pdf 2014)
Evelin Lindner and Linda Hartling contributed to the Public Event on the afternoon of December 3, 2015, at the 12th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, which took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 3 - 4, 2015. Linda Hartling is the Director of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network. Evelin Lindner is the founding president of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network and she explains the background of, and the intentions behind the Nobel Peace Prize. See also her reflections on her 2015 nomination, and meet the inspirer of the prize, Bertha von Suttner. We very much thank Gabriela Saab for the video-taping!

• 72 Claudia Lutschewitz und Andreas Lucewicz mit Evelin Lindner, Begegnung am 12. Januar 2016
Am 12. January 2016 kamen Claudia Lutschewitz und ihr Mann Andreas Lucewicz nach Hameln, um mit Evelin Lindner zu sprechen. Das Interview mit Claudia Lutschewitz ist in Mediator 01/2016, Seiten 4-9: Menschlichkeit und Mediation: Ein Leben für Würde und gegen Demütigung.

• 73 From Humiliation, Vengeance, and Genocide to Reconciliation: Experiences from Rwanda, 3rd March 2016 (UiO Podcast edition | YouTube edition)
Lecture at the Department of Psychology, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, Oslo, Norway, auditorium 3. It is a great privilege to be part of PSY4506 - Human Rights, Democracy and Reconstruction after Conflict; A community based approach, by Nora Sveaass and Inger Skjelsbæk, 3rd March 2016, 12.15-14.00. This lecture is also part of an annual series by Evelin Lindner hosted by the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo, Norway (until 2014 as part of PSYC3203 - Anvendt sosialpsykologi, in 2015 as guest lecture; see the video site of the Faculty of Social Science at the University of Oslo). In June 2015, the 25th Annual Dignity Conference took place in Kigali, Rwanda.

• 74 From Humiliation, Vengeance, and Genocide to Reconciliation: Experiences from Rwanda, 7th March 2016
Monday lunch / Mandagslunsj with Evelin Lindner, introduction / åpningsinnlegg Inga Bostad, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights / Norsk senter for menneskerettigheter, University of Oslo, Cort Adelers gate 30, 0162 Oslo, Norway, Seminarrom Asbjørn Eide, 7th March 2016, 12:00 - 13:00, see announcement. In June 2015, the 25th Annual Dignity Conference took place in Kigali, Rwanda. Thanks to Heidetraut von Weltzien Høivik for taking lovely photos, and to Ann Kristin Ulrichsen for doing the video recording.

• 75 The Story of the Siwa Jewellery, 11th March 2016
A little introduction to the Deep Dao Dialogue: Dignilogue with Evelin Lindner in the Arne Næss Chair (see the invitation as Pdf, and on Facebook), at the Norsk Taiji Senter / Norwegian Taiji Centre, director Pamela Hiley, Kirkegata 1-3, 0153 Oslo, Norway, 11th March 2016, 19.00. Thanks a lot to Allan Hiley for doing the video recording! See photos.

• 76 Deep Dao Dialogue: Dignilogue with Evelin Lindner in the Arne Næss Chair, 11th March 2016
Norsk Taiji Senter (Norwegian Taiji Centre), director Pamela Hiley, Kirkegata 1-3, 0153 Oslo, Norway, 11th March 2016, 19.00. Thanks a lot to Pamela Hiley for taking lovely photos and to Allan Hiley for doing the video recording!

• 77 A World at Risk: From Humiliation to Dignity, Evelin Lindner, 19th September 2016 (see the Powerpoint presentation of 26th September)
The 27th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies took place in Dubrovnik, Croatia, from 19th September - 23rd September 2016. This is Evelin Lindner's keynote address on 19th September 2016.

• 78 Cities at Risk – From Humiliation to Dignity, by Evelin Lindner, 22nd September 2016 (long paper | Powerpoint presentation of 26th September)
Lindner's keynote address given on 22nd September 2016 at the 27th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies that took place in Dubrovnik, Croatia, 19th September – 23rd September 2016. See the abstract written with Kjell Skyllstad prior to the conference in 2015.

• 79 From Systemic Humiliation to Systemic Dignity, by Evelin Lindner, 26th September 2016 (see Powerpoint)
It was a great privilege to be invited to 'Tools and Practices for the Collective Mind Revolution', the 5th biennial meeting of the Knowledge Federation, a conference held at the Inter-University Centre Dubrovnik, 25th September – 1st October, 2016.

• 80 Book launch: Honor, Humiliation, and Terror
Columbia University, Teachers College, Gottesman Libraries, room Russell 306, on December 7, 2016, 12.00 - 2pm. See the invitation, the invitation flyer, and the event in the Gottesman Libraries Calendar. Thank you, dear Talia Shafir for doing such nice video recording! Please be aware that this is an unedited video.

• 81 Linda Hartling and Evelin Lindner in Dignilogue on "The Globalization of Dignity," December 8, 2016 (Video | Questions Prepared by Linda)
Evelin Lindner and Linda Hartling contributed in the morning on December 8, 2016, to the 13th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, which took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 8 - 9, 2016. Linda Hartling is the Director of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network. Evelin Lindner is the founding president of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network. We very much thank Mariana Ferraz for the video-taping! Please be aware that this is an unedited video.

• 82 Evelin Lindner Shares the Story of the Jewelry from the Oasis Siwa, December 9, 2016
Evelin Lindner shares the story of the jewelry from the oasis Siwa on the afternoon of December 9, 2016, at the 13th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, which took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 8 - 9, 2016. We very much thank Mariana Ferraz for doing the video-taping! Correction: Please note that Evelin was a medical student in Bangkok in 1981 (not in 1998)! Please be aware that this is an unedited video.

•  83 Good-Bye Snapshots by Hua-Chu Yen with Sharon and Evelin
Thank you, dear Hua-Chu Yen, for taking such lovely snapshots when we said good-bye to each other on the afternoon of December 9, 2016, at the end of the 13th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, which took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 8 - 9, 2016. Hua-Chu Yen (Ed. D.) is an artist, educator and digital media specialist. (Please be aware that this is an unedited video.)

•  84 Good-Bye Snapshots by Hua-Chu Yen with Naoko and Evelin
Thank you, dear Hua-Chu Yen, for taking such lovely snapshots when we said good-bye to each other on the afternoon of December 9, 2016, at the end of the 13th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, which took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 8 - 9, 2016. Hua-Chu Yen (Ed. D.) is an artist, educator and digital media specialist. (Please be aware that this is an unedited video.)

• 85 Mini-Documentary of the Annual Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict "The Globalization of Dignity," December 8 - 9, 2016
The 13th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 8 - 9, 2016. We very much thank Mariana Ferraz for making this wonderful mini-documentary! Thank you, dear Mariana, and also you, dear Gaby Saab, for inviting so many of us into this documentary, from Janet Gerson to David Yamada, Michael Perlin, Philip Brown, Kebadu Mekonnen Gebremariam, David Yau-Fai Ho! How great that you chose the song "A Wonderful World" in the background, the very song that David Yamada brought to us! Linda Hartling is the Director of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network. Evelin Lindner is the founding president of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network.

• 86 Interview with Evelin Lindner - Challenges of our Time; Learning to Connect, December 8, 2016
The 13th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 8 - 9, 2016. We very much thank Mariana Ferraz for making this interview! Thank you, dear Mariana, and also you, dear Gaby Saab, for inviting so many of us into wonderful interviews!

• 87 Post-Conflict Reconstruction and Reconciliation: The Case of Rwanda, 2nd March 2017 (YouTube edition | YouTube clip by Esben Østbye)
Lecture at the Department of Psychology, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, Oslo, Norway, auditorium 2. It is a great privilege to be part of PSY4506 - Human Rights, Democracy and Reconstruction after Conflict; A community based approach, by Nora Sveaass and Inger Skjelsbæk, 2nd March 2017, 12.15-14.00, Tel. +47 22845000. This lecture is part of an annual series by Evelin Lindner hosted by the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo, Norway (until 2014 as part of PSYC3203 - Anvendt sosialpsykologi, in 2015 as guest lecture; see the video site of the Faculty of Social Science at the University of Oslo). In June 2015, the 25th Annual Dignity Conference took place in Kigali, Rwanda. See also a similar lecure from 2016: UiO Podcast 2016 edition | YouTube 2016 edition.

• 88 Honour, Humiliation, and Terror, 13th March 2017
Monday lunch / Mandagslunsj with Evelin Lindner, introduction / åpningsinnlegg Inga Bostad, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights / Norsk senter for menneskerettigheter, University of Oslo, Cort Adelers gate 30, 0162 Oslo, Norway, Seminarrom Asbjørn Eide, 13th March 2017, 12:00 - 13:00, see announcement. Thank you to Zuzana Luckay for coming all the way from Slovakia! And what an honour to have Nils Butenschøn with us, together with Trine Eklund, Lisbeth and Per Glad, Barbro Bakken, and Inga's dear friend Annette!
Thanks a lot also to Lisbeth and Barbro for taking such lovely photos, and to Zuzana for doing the video recording!

• 89 Åpent temamøte: Om ydmykelse, 22. mars 2017
22. mars 2017, 19.00 – 21.00, Litteraturhuset, Wergelandsveien 29, 0167 Oslo, invitert av Human-Etisk Forbund, Oslo fylkeslag. Se invitasjon. Takk til Lasse Moer for å gjøre videoopptaket!

• 90 Mit dem Pfeifer von Hameln, 26. Juni 2017
On 26th June 2017, it was a great pleasure to be invited to the "red sofa" in front of the museum of Hamelin in Germany. The invitees were the Pied Piper of Hamelin, or, to be precise, his contemporary personification by Michael Boyer, together with the director of the museum, Stefan Daberkow. See the flyer of the event and its announcement.
If we look at the legend of the Pied Piper, then historical evidence shows that there was indeed such a person as a Pied Piper. It is possible that he was a recruiter for German settlement into the East, the so-called Ostsiedlung (settlement of the East), which took place during the High Middle Ages. This settlement included also what later became known as Silesia. As it seems, the historical Pied Piper left Hamelin in 1284 with 130 of the city's young people, perhaps taking them eastward (perhaps not, there is no evidence). During the years after World War II, from 1945 onward, the arrival of masses of forcibly displaced people people arriving precisely from that east could be interpreted as a "return" of those youths that left in 1284, albeit many hundreds of years later. Michael Boyer reminded me of the sign above the entrance to the Bürgergarten, where, as he explained, Professor Ihle had made a connection between the legend and this "return." See more here.

• 91 Evelin Lindner Welcomes Everybody
The 29th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies took place at the Renaissance University in Indore, India, from 16th - 19th August 2017. Evelin Lindner welcomes everybody on the first day of the conference, on 16th August 2017.

• 92 Evelin Lindner's Introductory Talk
The 29th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies took place at the Renaissance University in Indore, India, from 16th - 19th August 2017. Evelin Lindner introduces herself and the work of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network on the first day of the conference, on 16th August 2017.

• 93 On the Nature of Dignity and Humiliation
The 29th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies took place at the Renaissance University in Indore, India, from 16th - 19th August 2017. On the third day of the conference, 18th August 2017, Swapnil Kothari visits with his students, and Evelin Lindner contributes with her comments on the nature of dignity and humiliation.

• 94 Dignity in Times of Globalisation
The 29th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies took place at the Renaissance University in Indore, India, from 16th - 19th August 2017. Evelin Lindner speaks on 'Dignity in Times of Globalisation', at the Public Function of the conference on its last day, on 19th August 2017.

• 95 Evelin Lindner Being Honoured
The 29th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies took place at the Renaissance University in Indore, India, from 16th - 19th August 2017. On the fourth and last day of the conference, on 19th August 2017, the Renaissance University honoured Evelin Lindner for organising this conference.

• 96 Evelin Lindner Waving from the Dialogue Home of Dr. Rajesh Dixit and Dr. Amita Neerav
The 29th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies took place at the Renaissance University in Indore, India, from 16th - 19th August 2017. Evelin Lindner waves from the Dialogue Home of Dr. Rajesh Dixit and Dr. Amita Neerav on her last day in Indore, 18th September 2017.

• 97 What Is the Aim of Education? The Need to Educate in Dignity and for Dignity
Lecture given on November 15, 2017, in the context of the International Education Week 2017 organized by the Office of International Services (OIS) at Teachers College (TC), Columbia University, New York City. Thank you to Patricia Gibson for video-taping the talk!
The talk was inspired, among others, by "The case for internationalisation of higher education," by Patrick Blessinger and Barbara Cozza, University World News, Issue No:478, 13th October 2017. This article offers the following chronology:
• 1870 to 1914: the colonial university
• 1945 to 1980: the Humboldtian university
• From 1980: the entrepreneurial university
In my talk, I attempted to model a Humboldtian approach, as also John Dewey would have resonated with. The aim of education is, or ought to be, the dance of dignity, the dance of balancing unity in diversity.(see the “infinity dance” at the Alvin Ailey Dance Theater).

The talk was followed by "gifts of dignifying art" from the 2016 dignity conference in Dubrovnik, Croatia:
Ljoba Jenče Shared Her Art
and from the 2017 dignity conference in Indore, India:
Pranjali Singh Parihar Taught 'Kathak' Dance to Nira Shahaf
Pranjali Singh Parihar Taught Nira Shahaf to Dance 'Kathak'
Abstract: TC has a great heritage of inspiring the world with humanistic and critical thinking about education, from the groundbreaking work of John Dewey and William Heard Kilpatrick to the achievements of their most recent successors, an education that educates in dignity and for dignity. This heritage is of highest value in today’s world, where global challenges require innovative solutions that transcend present-day strategies. Lindner has just published a book titled Honor, Humiliation, and Terror: An Explosive Mix – And How We Can Defuse It with Dignity, where she describes her observation that a foreboding sense of fear and terror is in the process of emerging on all continents, and the important window of opportunity that stands open for dignity to step in.

• 98 Honor, Humiliation, and Terror: Claudia Cohen in Dialogue with Evelin Lindner About Her New Book
This is a dialogue recorded in the studio of Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, by Hua-Chu Yen, on November 16, 2017.
The book came out in World Dignity University Press, an imprint of Dignity Press, in 2017. The Foreword was written by Linda Hartling, director of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies. Thank you, dear Claudia and Hua-Chu!

• 99 Honor, Humiliation, and Terror: Chipamong Chowdhury (known in the monastic communities as Bhante Revata) in Dialogue with Evelin Lindner About Her New Book
This is a dialogue recorded in the studio of Teachers College, Columbia University, New York City, by Hua-Chu Yen, on November 16, 2017.
The book came out in World Dignity University Press, an imprint of Dignity Press, in 2017. The Foreword was written by Linda Hartling, director of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies. Thank you, dear Bhante, Claudia, and Hua-Chu!

• 100 How Dignity and Humiliation Inform Conflict, Including at the Work Place, Particularly in a Global Setting (Pdf of Powerpoint)
Reflections shared with the United Nations Ombudsman and Mediation Services (UNOMS) in New York City on November 30, 2017.

• 101 Honor, Humiliation, and Terror: An Explosive Mix – and How We Can Defuse It with Dignity
Talk given on December 8, 2017, at the 14th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, titled “The Nature of Dignity – the Dignity of Nature,” at Columbia University, December 7 – 8, 2017. See the book here.

• 102.0 A Brief Introduction into Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies
A brief Introduction into Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, given at the Centre for Peace Studies of the University of Tromsø, Northern Norway, 8th February 2018. Thank you, dear Ekaterina Trunova, for conducting and recording this interview!

• 102.1 Introduction into Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies
An introduction into Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, given at the Centre for Peace Studies of the University of Tromsø, Northern Norway, 8th February 2018. Thank you, dear Ekaterina Trunova, for conducting and recording this interview!

• 103 Honor, Humiliation, and Terror: An Explosive Mix – and How We Can Defuse It with Dignity
Book presentation at the Eldorado Bookshop in Oslo, Norway, Saturday, 17th February 2018, 14.00. We thank Eldorado Bookshop for this invitation. Please note that the video is unedited. See the book here and the invitation to all of Evelin's 2018 talks in Norway here.

• 104 On Dignity and Humiliation (UiO Podcast edition | YouTube edition)
Annual open lecture at the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo in Norway, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, seminar room 6, 2nd March 2018, 12.15-14.00. We thank the Department of Psychology for this invitation and Lasse Moer for a fantastic video documantation. See all of Evelin's 2018 talks in Norway at http://conta.cc/2GGEURH.

• 105 Ære, ydmykelse og terror
Foredrag for Akademiet for livslang læring, Grenland (ALL), i Skagerak Arena i Skien, 20. februar 2018. Vi takker Ragnar Wesseltoft for invitasjonen! Vær oppmerksom på at videoen er uredigert.
Se bilder her, boken her og invitasjonen til alle av Evelin's 2018 foredrag i Norge her.

• 106 Effekten av ydmykelser
Foredrag for Asker Rotary i Thon hotell Vettre, mandag 19. mars 2018, kl 18.15. Vi takker Are Langmoen for invitasjonen! Vær oppmerksom på at videoen er uredigert. Videon er tatt med et vanlig kamera som dessverre justerer fokus hele tiden.
Se bilder her, boken her og invitasjonen til alle av Evelin's 2018 foredrag i Norge her.

• 107.1 Video message 1 for the Indore World Summit 2018
This video message was delivered by Evelin Lindner on 3rd June 2018 in Germany, invited by Tejas Kumar Jain, announcing the Indore World Summit 2018 that took place in Indore 17th – 19th August 2018. Read the transcript here.

• 107.2 Video message 2 for the Indore World Summit 2018
This video message was delivered by Evelin Lindner on 29th July 2018 in Germany, invited by Tejas Kumar Jain, announcing the Indore World Summit 2018 that took place in Indore 17th – 19th August 2018.

• 107.3 Video message 3 for the Indore World Summit 2018
This video message was delivered by Evelin Lindner on 15th August 2018 in Cairo, Egypt, invited by Tejas Kumar Jain, greeting the Indore World Summit 2018 that took place in Indore 17th – 19th August 2018.

• 108.0 Video message for the 2018 Conference 'Strategies for a Sustainable Future' in Cairo, Egypt
This video message was recorded by Evelin Lindner on 15th August 2018 in Cairo, Egypt: Please join the 2018 Conference titled 'Dignity and Innovation – Strategies for a Sustainable Future, with a Special Focus on Agriculture and Water'! A very warm welcome to students, professors, artists, practitioners, and anybody interested in the theme of this conference.
Please send us an email if you wish to participate. Please see all information here.

• 108.1 Video message for the 2018 Conference 'Strategies for a Sustainable Future' in Cairo, Egypt (more personal version)
This video message was recorded by Evelin Lindner on 15th August 2018 in Cairo, Egypt: Please join the 2018 Conference titled 'Dignity and Innovation – Strategies for a Sustainable Future, with a Special Focus on Agriculture and Water'! A very warm welcome to students, professors, artists, practitioners, and anybody interested in the theme of this conference.
Please send us an email if you wish to participate. Please see all information here.

• 109 From Humiliation to Dignity: For a Future of Global Solidarity
Lecture given on November 14, 2018, as part of the International Education Week 2018 organized by the Office of International Services (OIS) at Teachers College (TC), Columbia University, New York City, Grace Dodge Hall 279. See here the invitation to this talk. Thank you to Judit Révész for video-taping the talk!

• 110 From Humiliation to Dignity: For a Future of Global Solidarity
Pre-launch of Evelin Lindner's book From Humiliation to Dignity: For a Future of Global Solidarity, on December 5, 2018, 12 - 2 pm in Gottesman Libraries of Teachers College at Columbia University, Russell Hall, room 306. See an invitation, a flyer and the event announcement in the Gottesman Libraries Calendar. Thank you, dear, for doing such nice video recording! (Please be aware that this is an unedited video). Thank you most warmly, dear Jennifer Govan, for making this talk possible!

• 111.0 The Dignity Family Honors Evelin Lindner
To Evelin Lindner's great surprise, members of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies community have prepared a collection of essays in honor of her service to the shared dignity work. Bhante Chipamong Chowdhury had the initial idea and was supported by Linda Hartling and Michael Britton in collecting and editing essays from members of the dignity community. Here Bhante presents the collection at the HumanDHS Board Meeting at Columbia University on December 5, 2018.
Evelin: "I am deeply touched, dear dignity friends, and I have no words to express how much your loving appreciation means to me! What an incredible gift of love! I have no words!"

• 111.1 The Dignity Family Honors Evelin Lindner
To Evelin Lindner's great surprise, members of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies community have prepared a collection of essays in honor of her service to the shared dignity work. Bhante Chipamong Chowdhury had the initial idea and was supported by Linda Hartling and Michael Britton in collecting and editing essays from members of the dignity community. Here Bhante presents the collection on the second day of our annual "Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict" at Columbia University in New York City, on December 6, 2018.
Evelin: "I am deeply touched, dear dignity friends, and I have no words to express how much your loving appreciation means to me! What an incredible gift of love! I have no words!"

• 112 On Dignity and Humiliation
Annual open lecture at the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo in Norway, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, auditorium 3, 22nd March 2019, 12.15-14.00. We thank the Department of Psychology for this invitation and Lasse Moer for a fantastic video documentation. See also the UiO Podcast edition. See all of Evelin's 2019 talks in Norway at https://conta.cc/2Rr9W5l.

• 113 Annual Mandela Lecture, United World College, Norway 'From Humiliation to Dignity: For a Future of Global Solidarity'
It was a great honour for Evelin Lindner to be invited to hold the Annual Mandela Lecture at the Red Cross Nordic United World College in 6968 Flekke, Fjaler kommune, Sogn og Fjordane, Norway, on 29th March 2019. The title of her lecture was 'From Humiliation to Dignity: For a Future of Global Solidarity'. Thank you to Manuel Macedo for recording this lecture! (Please be aware that this is an unedited video.) See Sven BD Onnerstad's wonderful photos!

• 114 Birthday Greetings to Betty Reardon from Mai-Bente Bonnevie and Evelin Lindner
The Mother of Peace Education, Betty Reardon, turns 90 on 12th June 2019. In this little video greeting, Mai-Bente Bonnevie, Evelin Lindner, and Magnus Haavelsrud send loving birthday greetings to her. Magnus Haavelsrud, professor emeritus in peace education, is recording this little message during Mai-Bente's art exhibition in Oscarsgate 84 in Oslo on 31st March 2019.

• 115 Für ein neues Miteinander
Vortrag von Evelin Lindner im Bürgerhus, Kupferschmiedestr. 13, Hameln, 19. August, 2019, 19.00 Uhr
Organisatoren: Artes Wesera & ZediTA (Leider hört das Video am Ende wegen Tonstörung plötzlich auf.)
Hier ist die Pressemitteilung (die auch in der Deister- und Weserzeitung (Dewezet) erschien), dann die Einladung, und die Vorankündigung in der Dewezet, und dann der Dewezet Artikel danach, mit dem Titel Für 'ein neues Miteinander'.
Ankündigung im Radio-Aktiv mit Jens Lindner:"Für ein neues Miteinander"

• 116 The members of the Rivers of Encounter Project were welcomed by the City Hall of Marabá, Pará, Amazon, Brasil
This is the relevant section edited out by Evelin Lindner from the video of the entire session (cell phone version) that was recorded by the City Hall and posted on their Facebook page
At the opening of the ordinary session on the morning of Wednesday, 28th August 2109, the Marabá City Council in the State of Pará in the Amazon of Brasil welcomed members of the Rivers of Encounter Project, who were scheduled to leave for a tour of four European countries (Austria, Poland, Germany, and Belgium) on 2nd September. Six young people from the Cabelo Seco Community of Marabá were on their way to defend the Amazon in Europe, showing the strength of culture and what they are doing to help preserve it.
The Câmara Municipal de Marabá, Prefeitura de Marabá, the City Hall of Marabá or the Marabá City Council, is made up of twenty-one seats since 2013 (until 2012 there were thirteen), when, by determination of the Superior Electoral Court, the municipalities got a number of councilors equivalent to their population. The old City Hall building was called Palacete Augusto Dias. The current City Hall building was opened on December 23, 2010.
See also the article in the local newspaper Correio: 'Jovens vão à Europa defender a Amazônia'
See also Rios de Encontro: Towards a Good Living Amazon (Flying River Tour)

• 117 Evelin Lindner's Message to the City Council of Marabá in the Amazonian State of Pará, Brasil (recorded on her own camera)
video-recording on Evelin's camera
– the relevant section edited out by Evelin Lindner from the video of the entire session (cell phone version) that was recorded by the City Hall and posted on their Facebook page
This is Evelin Lindner's message to the City Hall of Marabá, Pará, Amazon, Brasil, on 28th August 2019. At the opening of the ordinary session on the morning of Wednesday, 28th August 2109, the Marabá City Council welcomed members of the Rivers of Encounter Project. Evelin Lindner was invited to deliver a brief message at a time when the Amazon Rainforest was on fire. Dan Baron translated from English to Portuguese. Evelin Lindner was in Marabá as one of the conveners of the 33rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, a 'Caravan' conference titled 'Cultivating Good Living Amazon: Nurturing Solidarity with Mother Earth', 28th August – 7th September 2019. The conference was accompanied by a global WhatsApp group of 50 participants.
See also the article in the local newspaper Correio: 'Jovens vão à Europa defender a Amazônia'. See, furthermore, Rios de Encontro: Towards a Good Living Amazon (Flying River Tour)

• 117.0 Interview with Dan Baron, Gaby Saab, and Evelin Lindner in Radio Correio 92.1 in Marabá
Sandro Campos and Célia Campos interviewed Dan Baron, Gabriela Saab, and Evelin Lindner on 30th August 2019, at a time when the Amazon Rainforest was on fire. Dan Baron and Gaby Saab translated Evelin's contributions from English to Portuguese. Gabriela Saab and Evelin Lindner were in Marabá for the 33rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, a 'Caravan' conference titled 'Cultivating Good Living Amazon: Nurturing Solidarity with Mother Earth', 28th August – 7th September 2019. The conference was accompanied by a global WhatsApp group of 50 participants.

• 118 Circle of Love Gifts in the Amazonian State of Pará
Evelin Lindner lives globally to gather a global community of people who wish to nurture dignity around the world, and whenever she receives a gift in one part of the world, she takes it to another part of the world and looks for a worthy recipient for that gift. The concept is called 'circle of love gifts'. When she has found a worthy recipient, she tries to take a picture of the recipient and sends it to the giver of the gift (the photos you see above will therefore be sent to the givers of the gifts). In that way, not only is her global life a bridge-building endeavour, also the gifts that she carries help build more bridges. It is also a 'footprint' of her path through the world.
This video shows the Circle of Love Gift session with Dan Baron and Gaby Saab in the House of Rivers in Cabelo Seco on 30th August 2019, as part of the 33rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, a 'Caravan' conference titled 'Cultivating Good Living Amazon: Nurturing Solidarity with Mother Earth', 28th August – 7th September 2019. The conference was accompanied by a global WhatsApp group with 50 participants. You see many gifts Evelin bought in Egypt for the AfroRaiz artists to inspire them to explore their links to the north of Africa.

• 119 The World Dignity University Initiative in Vila Praia Alta
In this video, Evelin Lindner explains the relevance of communities like Vila Praia Alta in the Amazon for the idea of the World Dignity University Initiative. Gabriela Saab and Evelin Lindner were deeply impressed by the sustainability of the ways of living they encountered when they had the privilege of spending time there on 31st August 2019. They saw almost no plastic, almost no waste, everything was used. Here, animals are alive, rather than being 'produced'. A rooster crows in the morning, indicating that animals are allowed to have a family, allowed to have a social life in their own right, rather than being reduced to being servants of human needs – being used as pets at best (to help placate the loneliness and disconnection in societies of excessive individualism), or consumed as food. The kitchen is outside of the house under an umbrella! And the shell of the babaçu nuts serve as charcoal!
This is one of Evelin Lindner's contributions to the Marabá-part of the 33rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, a 'Caravan' conference titled 'Cultivating Good Living Amazon: Nurturing Solidarity with Mother Earth', 28th August – 7th September 2019. The conference was accompanied by a global WhatsApp group with 50 participants.

• 120 Encontre e conecte! Please Meet and Connect!
Lecture given at the Instituto Humana in Mosqueiro, Belém, Pará, Brasil, 4th September 2019, for the Belém-part of the 33rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, a ‘Caravan’ conference titled ‘Cultivating Good Living Amazon: Nurturing Solidarity with Mother Earth’, in the Amazonian State of Pará, 28th August – 7th September 2019. Evelin Lindner was one of the main conveners of this conference, with Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet as the convener of the Belém-part of our conference, and Gaby Saab as host of the international WhatsApp group with 50 participants that accompanied the conference.

• 121 The Amazon Day at the Parliament of Pará State in Belém: Deputado Dirceu Ten Caten Invited Evelin Lindner
Dirceu Ten Caten is a Congressman / Deputado in the Legislative Assembly of the State of Pará / Assembleia Legislativa do Estado do Pará ALEPA in Belém, the capital of the Amazonian State of Pará, Brasil. He invited a wide variety of delegates from all walks of life to his celebration of the Amazon Day on 5th September 2019. He kindly invited Evelin Lindner to speak. Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet translated from English into Portuguese. Please see the official video recording of the entire event of almost three hours on Facebook in large format (or cell phone format). This is the section that Evelin Lindner edited out from the large recording.
Evelin Lindner was in Belém as one of the conveners of of the 33rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, a 'Caravan' conference titled 'Cultivating Good Living Amazon: Nurturing Solidarity with Mother Earth', 28th August – 7th September 2019. The conference was accompanied by a global WhatsApp group with 50 participants.

• 122 Evelin Lindner on Combú Island, Amazonian State of Pará, Brasil
This is Evelin Lindner on Combù island in the Amazonian State of Pará, Brasil, on 6th September 2019. Combú island is 15 minutes by boat across the Guamá river from Belém. Evelin speaks at a time, when the Amazon Rainforest is burning further southwest. On Combú island she saw the unbelievable beauty and richness of the Amazon Rainforest, and in this little video she tries to express her sadness about the fact that others strive to destroy these riches so that a few can increase their profit margin. Evelin is almost afraid to show this paradisiac place to the world in this video, because not only flames can destroy a place, mass tourism has turned out to be destructive, too. This is Evelin Lindner's contribution to the Belém-part of the 33rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, a 'Caravan' conference titled 'Cultivating Good Living Amazon: Nurturing Solidarity with Mother Earth', 28th August – 7th September 2019. The conference was accompanied by a global WhatsApp group with 50 participants.

• 123 Praça da República in Belém, Amazonian State of Pará, Brasil, 8th September 2019
Praça da República in Belém, capital of the Amazonian State of Pará, Brasil, 8th September 2019.
This video is made at the end of Evelin Lindner's time in the Amazonian State of Pará, on 8th September 2019. It marks the end of the 33rd Annual Dignity Conference in the Amazon that took place in Marabá and Belém from 29th August to 7th September 2019. See the website of the conference: www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/annualmeeting/33.php.
Evelin was advised by locals that robbery even at gunpoint can happen also during day-time, and anywhere in the city, and she therefore exercised approprate caution.
This video is kept 'unlisted' to protect the privacy of the people who are included. Only those who have the URL can see it. The cover photo is taken from Wikipedia.

• 124 Mercado Ver-o-peso in Belém, 9th September 2019
The Ver-o-peso market in Belém, capital of the Amazonian State of Pará, Brasil, 9th September 2019.
This video is made on the last day of Evelin Lindner's time in the Amazonian State of Pará, on 9th September 2019. It marks the end of the 33rd Annual Dignity Conference in the Amazon that took place in Marabá and Belém from 29th August to 7th September 2019. See the website of the conference: www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/annualmeeting/33.php.
Evelin was advised by locals that robbery even at gunpoint can happen also during day-time, and anywhere in the city, and she therefore exercised approprate caution. At the end of this video, you met Miriam, who kindly got Evelin an Uber (widely used both in Marabá and Belém) and waited with Evelin for the car to arrive in a safe place in front of a little police stand.
This video is kept 'unlisted' to protect the privacy of the people who are included. Only those who have the URL can see it. The cover photo is taken from Wikipedia.
This video is mainly in English and Portuguese (since Evelin's time in Brasil in 2012, her Portuguese has gone rusty, sorry), and at the end there is some French. Hopefully, you can use the automatic subtitle function so that you can see subtitles in your language (click on the wheel in the lower right corner).
Evelin explains: 'In our global dignity network, we create "circles of love gifts", meaning that people on one continent give small gifts for other members of our global fellowship on another continent. The giver and receiver are connected by email, so that these gifts become bridge-builders. When time is too short, Evelin sometimes also buys gifts (small unexpensive light-weight gifts). She avoids high-flying souvernir shops (in touristic places, many of the items are now mass-produced in China anyway) and looks for people who make things themselves. She also looks for household items that might be considered "normal" on one continent and are educational for people on another continent. She never just buys 'things', but attempts to forge relationships and to understand the source and use of the items in the lives of the local people. She asks for permission to take a picture or make a little video'.

• 125 A Summary of Evelin Lindner's Impressions During the 2019 Dignity Conference in the Amazon, 10th October 2019
In this video, Evelin Lindner tries to summarise her impressions and reflections in the Amazonian State of Pará from 26th August to 10th September 2019. She created this video after the 33rd Annual Dignity Conference had ended, of which she was one of the conveners. The conference took place in Marabá and Belém from 29th August to 7th September 2019, and was accompanied by a global WhatsApp group. Please be aware that this video has been brought together using very basic software. It is kept 'unlisted' to protect the privacy of the people who are included.

• 126.1 Interview mit Hannemarie und Hermann Düvel in Esperde bei Hameln, in Niedersachsen, 22. November 2019 (more).
• 126.2 Interview mit Hannemarie Düvel in Esperde bei Hameln, in Niedersachsen, 16. September 2020 (more).

• 127 Can We Teach Dignity? Lessons from the People of the Amazon
Evelin Lindner and Gabriela Saab contributed to the Public Event on the afternoon of December 5, 2019, at the 16th Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, which took place at Columbia University in New York City, December 5 – 6, 2019. They share their experiences from the 33rd Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies in the Amazonian State of Pará in Brasil, a 'Caravan' conference titled 'Cultivating Good Living Amazon: Nurturing Solidarity with Mother Earth', 28th August – 7th September 2019. Gabriela Saab is a Member of the Board of Directors of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies (HumanDHS) network. Evelin Lindner is the founding president of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies network.

• 128 Poly Money Podcast with Mel Wymore, Stefanie Overbeck and Riley Paul
New York City, recorded on December 1, 2019, published on March 24, 2020.
Please click on the visualization to see it larger!

•129 Der brennende Regenwald – und was wir damit zu tun haben (Video)
Talk in Hamelin, Lower Saxony, Germany, 15th January 2020, 19.00, in the Pavillon of Radio Aktiv, invited by Andrea Brenker-Pegesa, Chairwoman of BUND Hameln-Pyrmont (BUND stands for Bund für Umwelt und Naturschutz Deutschland or Friends of the Earth Germany, and is one of Germany's largest environmental protection organisations). See the announcement on the BUND site and as Pdf.
Incorporated videos:
The Babaçu Palm and Its Beetle Larva Gongo in Vila Praia Alta on Ilha do Praia Alta in the river Tocantins near Marabá in the Amazonian State of Pará, Brasil
Urucum Vila Praia Alta + Ver-o-peso
The World Dignity University Initiative in Vila Praia Alta
• Evelin Lindner's Message to the City Council of Marabá
• The Amazon Day at the Parliament of Pará State in Belém: Deputado Dirceu Ten Caten invited Evelin Lindner
Evelin Lindner on Combú island

• 130 On Dignity and Humiliation: The Case of the Amazon Rainforest
Annual open lecture at the Department of Psychology at the University of Oslo in Norway, Harald Schjelderups hus, Forskningsveien 3, forsamlingssalen, 27th February 2020, 10.00–12.00. We thank the Department of Psychology for this invitation and Lasse Moer for a fantastic video documentation. See also the UiO Podcast edition. See all of Evelin's 2019 talks in Norway here.
A greeting to the Amazon was recorded at the end of Evelin Lindner's annual lecture and we thank Lasse Moer for recording this message.

• 131 Deep Dao Dialogue on Ecological Masculinities with Paul Pulé, Martin Hultman, and Evelin Lindner
Taiji Centre in Oslo, Norsk Taiji Senter, Kirkegata 1-3, 0153 Oslo, Norway, 28th February 2020, 19.00. See also an invitation on Facebook.
See for recent publications by Hultman and Pulé:
Ecological Masculinities, 2018, London: Routledge
'Climate change denial and far-right nationalism'
– 'Feminist energy politics

• 132 Nach Corona: Ein neues Miteinander! Vergiftetes Klima: Hass und Umweltzerstörung, Demütigung und Terror, eine explosive Mischung – und wie wir sie mit Würde entschärfen können (original streaming | downloaded video)| vorbereitender Vortrag vom 20. April 2020)
Digitaler Vortrag mit Live-Diskussion in Hameln, Niedersachsen, Deutschland, 13. Mai 2020, 19:00–21:15, auf Eingeladung der Volkshochschule Hameln-Pyrmont, urprünglich geplant im Lalu, Hefehof 2, Hameln, aber wegen Corona online. (Volkshochschulen or folk high schools are institutions for adult education in Europe, a concept originally inspired by the Danish writer, poet, philosopher, and pastor N. F. S. Grundtvig, 1783–1872). Sehen Sie die Einladung auf der VHS Seite. Unterstützer: amnesty international (ai) Hameln, ev.-luth. Kirchenkreis Hameln-Pyrmont. Die Veranstaltung ist kostenlos. Sehen Sie die Einladung in der Dewezet online, und in der Druckausgabe.

• 133 + 135 From Humiliation to Dignity: For a Future of Global Solidarity — The Coronavirus Pandemic as Opportunity in the Midst of Suffering
Evelin Lindner's contribution on 30th May 2020 to Panel 20 'Solidarity, Accessibility and Self', of the virtual conference 'The Psychology of Global Crises', convened by the American University of Paris, 20th–30th May 2020. Participants in this panel: Andrea C. Valente, Erinn C. Cameron & Fiona Cunningham, Gabriel Silva Xavier Nascimento, Sueli Salles Fidalgo & Eliezer Willian Simões Nascimento Xavier
Please see:
a preparatory 25 minutes presentation on 29th May 2020
a preparatory 60 minutes presentation on 29th May 2020
the final presentation of 35 minutes on 30th May 2020
the recording of the entire panel of 2.30 hours by the conference organisers

• 136 Humiliation to Dignity: Future of Global Solidarity (original streaming | downloaded video | Pdf)
E-Conclave invited by one of the leading schools of India, the Sri Sathya Sai Vidya Vihar in Indore, Madhya Pradesh, live on YouTube, Sunday, 12th July 2020, 12.00 Indian Standard Time (8.30 Central European Time, 02:30 US/Eastern Time, 23.30 Saturday, 11th July US/Pacific Time).
The inspirer of this event was the founder of the Renaissance University in Indore, Swapnil Kothari, the host of the 29th Annual Conference of Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies, 16th - 19th August 2017 'Dignity in Times of Globalisation' (see the picture at the bottom!)
See also:
• 'Covid-19 Deepening Income Inequality, Depression: Psychologist Evelin Lindner', Daijiworld, 31st July 2020 (see also Pdf).
• 'Three Times Nobel Peace Prize Nominee Evelin G Lindner Graces First Edition of E-Conclave "SRIJAN" in Indore', PTI/NewsVoir, The Week, 31st July 2020 (see also Pdf).
• 'Nobel Peace Prize Nominee Evelin G. Linder Becomes a Part of E-conclave Srijan', by TNN, Times of India, 20th July 2020 (see also Pdf).
• 'Three Times Nobel Peace Prize Nominee Ms. Evelin G. Lindner Graces the First Edition of E-Conclave “SRIJAN” Organised by Sri Sathya Sai Vidya Vihar, Indore,' by Sachin Murdeshwar, APN News, 16th July 2020 (see also Pdf).
• 'Three Times Nobel Peace Prize Nominee Evelin G. Lindner Graces the First Edition of E-conclave “SRIJAN”', Brainfeed Magazine, 17th July 2020 (see also Pdf).
• 'Evelin G. Lindner Attends the First Edition of e-Conclave “SRIJAN”', Media Catalyst, 18th July 2020 (see also Pdf).
• 'Three Times Nobel Peace Prize Nominee Ms. Evelin G. Lindner Graces the First Edition of E-conclave “SRIJAN” Organised by Sri Sathya Sai Vidya Vihar, Indore', India Education Diary, 18th July 2020 (see also Pdf).
• 'Three Times Nobel Peace Prize Nominee Ms. Evelin G. Lindner Graces the First Edition of E-conclave “SRIJAN” Organised by Sri Sathya Sai Vidya Vihar, Indore', Global Prime News, 16th July 2020 (see also Pdf).
• 'Three Times Nobel Peace Prize Nominee Evelin G. Lindner Graces the First Edition of E-conclave “SRIJAN” Organised by Sri Sathya Sai Vidya Vihar, Indore', by Sachin Murdeshwar, Global Newz Service, 16th July 2020 (see also Pdf).
• 'Three Times Nobel Peace Prize Nominee Ms. Evelin G. Lindner Graces the First Edition of E-conclave “SRIJAN” Organised by Sri Sathya Sai Vidya Vihar, Indore', Times Global News, 16th July 2020 (see also Pdf).
Background material:
From Humiliation to Dignity: For a Future of Global Solidarity – The Coronavirus Pandemic as Opportunity in the Midst of Suffering
Paper finalised on 2nd April 2020 in Germany, reprinted in TRANSCEND Media Service in May 2020, and in InterViews: An Interdisciplinary Journal in Social Sciences, in July 2020.